German Student Visa Interview Questions and Answers - Owlcation - Education
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German Student Visa Interview Questions and Answers

Charles Nuamah is a student from Ghana currently studying abroad in Germany.

The visa interview always seems to be the scariest part of the process for students who wish to study abroad, but this shouldn’t be the case. The fact that a foreign university has offered you admission means they believe you are in good academic standing and have the skills necessary to pursue your desired program.

The aim of a visa interview in Germany is to confirm that you are in the right state of mind to study in the country. Being academically sound is only a small fraction of the total package students should possess in order to succeed abroad. Students are required to be mentally matured and independent, because studying in Germany is not always going to be a smooth ride. There are going to bumps along the way. Visa officers simply want to make sure you have made the right preparations for the life of a student studying abroad.

The questions asked during a German visa interview can be grouped into four categories. These are:

  1. Questions about Germany
  2. Questions about your seriousness as a student
  3. Questions that test your intentions
  4. Questions that asses your financial situation

Each one of these serves a specific purpose. The questions in each category are designed to extract certain crucial information from students, which gives the visa officer information with which to make their final decision. Below are the four categories with explanations of their purpose and example questions and answers.

1. Questions About Germany

The main purpose of this category is to determine if you are really motivated to study and live in Germany. If so, you will have gone out of your way to gather information about the country. If you have failed to do this, the interviewer will think you are unenthusiastic about living and studying there.

You should demonstrate to the consular officer that you are really passionate about Germany as a country, and have made an effort to get acquainted with some basic information.

Below are some questions that you are likely to encounter in this category, along with some perfect responses.

A) Why do you want to study in Germany and not in Canada or the United States of America?

I would like to study in Germany because the educational system is high-class and combines theoretical learning and practical training. As such, it is no surprise that the educational system in the country has produced influential scholars like Albert Einstein and Max Planck.

  • Note: If you are already proficient in the English language and not prepared to go through the sacrifice of learning another language, then I highly advise you choose English speaking countries like the USA or Canada. Otherwise, you will end up getting frustrated once you arrive in Germany as you will need the German language in all walks of life.

B) Where will you stay in Germany?

I will be staying in Duisburg since it only takes one hour by train to get to my school.

  • Note: If you are not successful in securing accommodation before your interview, do not panic. The German Embassy is aware that rooms can be hard to find especially in the big cities like Munich and Berlin and that it can take some time for students to secure permanent accommodations. In the meantime, you can use your school's address as your accommodation address in your German student visa application form. On the other hand, If you are lucky to secure accommodation before your interview, ensure that it is just a few hours from your school. If your accommodation is located very far away from your school, the Embassy will doubt if you can be able to make it to lectures several times in a week and will suspect you have another agenda other than studies.

C) What is the population of Germany?

Currently, the population of Germany is almost 82 million.

D) How have you been preparing for your stay in Germany?

I have succeeded in securing accommodation. This will make things a little easier once I arrive. I have also made an effort to learn the language so that I can integrate easily into German society.

  • Note: I can't emphasize this enough. It is very important you learn German to a certain degree before arriving in Germany. It makes things a little easier especially for those who intend to work part-time whilst studying. Most student jobs in Germany would require that you speak at least some basic German. It also helps when you are looking for accommodation as most landlords will prefer you communicate in German.

E) Who is the President of Germany?

The current President of Germany is Frank-Walter Steinmeier.

F) Who is the Chancellor of Germany?

The current Chancellor of Germany is Angela Merkel.

G) Can you name any important tourist attraction sites in Germany?

  • The Cologne Cathedral
  • Brandenburg Gate (Berlin)
  • Heidelberg Old City, Hohenzollern Castle
  • Rugen Cliffs
  • Old Town Hall (Bamberg)
  • Harz Mountains
  • Aachen Cathedral
  • Schwerin Castle

H) How many borders does Germany have, and with which countries?

Germany has nine borders with the following countries:

  1. Denmark
  2. Poland
  3. Czech Republic
  4. Austria
  5. Switzerland
  6. France
  7. Belgium
  8. Luxembourg
  9. The Netherlands

I) How many states are there in Germany, and can you name some of them?

There are 16 federal states in Germany. They are:

  1. Baden-Würtemberg
  2. Bayern
  3. Berlin
  4. Brandenburg
  5. Bremen
  6. Hamburg
  7. Hessen
  8. Niedersachsen
  9. Mecklenburg-Vorpommern
  10. Nordrhein-Westfalen
  11. Rheinland-Pfalz
  12. Saarland
  13. Sachsen
  14. Sachsen-Anhalt
  15. Schleswig-Holstein
  16. Thüringen.

J) Who told you about Germany?

I found out about Germany on my own while researching possible countries to pursue my master’s degree.

Map of Germany

2. Questions About Your Seriousness as a Student

This is the most important of the four categories of questions. Since your main purpose for going to Germany is to study, it is very important that you master the answers to these questions.

If you are unable to answer these questions convincingly, it is highly likely you will not leave a favorable impression in the mind of the consular officer.

Since they are very significant, these questions will make up about 50 percent of your interview.

A) What program did you apply for?

I applied for a master’s program in computer science.

  • Note: If you are going for a master's program, it is very important you make sure it is related to what you pursued in your bachelor's degree. Also, it is advisable not to apply for a second bachelor's degree or a second master's degree programme in Germany unless you have a very tangible reason.

B) Why did you choose this particular program?

The computer science program ranks highly compared to other computer science programs at other universities.

C) What is the name of your university?

The name of my university is Technical University of Munich

D) How many universities did you apply to?

I applied to five universities, all in the field of computer science.

E) Why did you choose this university?

I chose this university because it provides an excellent learning and working environment, and builds the necessary framework for long-term success in a short period of time.

F) Can you tell me some facts about your university?

My university, TU Munich, was founded by King Ludwig II in 1868. It was granted the right to award doctorates in 1901. It is one of the most successful universities in Germany’s excellence initiative.

G) Can you describe your course structure?

Semesters one and two impart technological know-how in the form of lectures, tutorials, and laboratory courses. In semester three, case studies are carried out in small teams of three to five students. In semester four, the program is concluded with the master's thesis.

H) Can you name some of the modules you will be studying?

Continuum mechanics, structural mechanics, the theory of stability, functional analysis, programming, and software engineering.

I) What is the duration of your program?

The duration of my program is two years.

J) When did you complete your undergraduate degree?

I completed my undergraduate degree in 2013.

K) What have you been doing since completing your undergraduate degree?

I have been working as a software developer.

  • Note: It is very important you portray to the Embassy that you have been doing something of value and not just sitting at home wasting your life away. If the Embassy has any reason to believe that you are not currently satisfied with the state of your life in your country, it can easily lead to the refusal of your visa.

I) Is this program relevant to your previous studies?

My bachelor degree was in computer science, and I was privileged to work on a project in robotics during my final year. I believe I have the necessary background and knowledge to be successful in this master's program.

  • Note: Students should avoid applying for master's programmes that are totally unrelated to what they did in their bachelor's degrees. When it is absolutely necessary to apply to a program in a new field, it is advisable to show solid proof of why you want to study in the new field which can be in the form of work experience.

M) Can you name some famous German researchers in your field?

Rudolph Bayer, who is professor emeritus of Informatics at the Technical University of Munich, and Wilfried Brauer, who was also a German computer scientist and professor emeritus at the Technical University of Munich.

N) What benefit will you derive from this course?

Graduates of this program have excellent opportunities when it comes to starting their careers, and will have good prospects in the future.

  • Note: The benefit should mainly revolve on what sort of positive impact studying the course can have on your home country.

O) Is the course taught in English or German?

The course is taught completely in English.

  • Note: If your course is taught completely in English then you are not required to present any German language certificate at the Embassy. However, if your course is taught partially or completely in German then it is mandatory you present some proof of German language proficiency at the Embassy.

P) Can you tell me your final scores in your bachelor’s degree, high school diploma, and your IELTS?

I had a percentage of 75 in my bachelor’s degree. My 10th and 12th class percentages were 70 and 80, respectively. My IELTS score is 6.5.

  • Note: The minimum grade for admission to most master's programs is 2.5 in the German grading system with 1.0 being the highest and 4.0 being the lowest. For IELTS, the minimum score is 6.5 though some universities accept 6.0. It is very important to note that unlike the US, most German universities do not place great emphasis on GRE scores. Very few universities may ask for your GRE scores and even if they do, they concentrate mainly on the quantitative section.

Q) How did you find out about your school?

I found out about my school as I was researching on the DAAD website.

R) What is the name of the city where your school is located?

Munich.

S) Can you tell me a little bit about the city where you will be studying?

Munich is the capital and largest city of the German state of Bavaria. Munich is the third largest city in Germany, after Berlin and Hamburg, and the 12th biggest city in the European Union, with a population of around 1.5 million. The name of the city is derived from the Old/Middle High German term Munichen, meaning "by the monks."

Technical University of Munich

Technical University of Munich

3. Questions That Test Your Intentions

This category is usually comprised of trick questions designed to find out if you are using your studies as a possible immigration route. The German embassy is well aware that a high percentage of students completely abandon their studies when they arrive in Germany to take up jobs. Therefore, they use this category to weed out fake students.

It is important to note that even though most students would like to stay permanently in Germany once they complete their studies, this is not what the German government wants. Only an exceptional few are allowed to stay. They are hoping that a large percentage of students will take the knowledge they learned abroad and apply it in their home countries. You should, therefore, be careful how you respond to this category of questions.

A) Is this course available in your home country? If so, why don’t you study it in your home country?

The course is not currently being offered in my country.

  • Note: Don’t lie. If the course is available in your home country, answer honestly. You never know what resources the visa officer has to verify your answer. If you answer no and the visa officer finds out the course is offered in your home country, you might as well gather your documents and leave the interview. If you do answer yes, a perfect reason you might give is, “The level of infrastructure and the quality of education offered in my home country cannot be compared to that in Germany. I believe doing this program in Germany will help me be a better-prepared, worldly graduate. Also, I get the opportunity to learn a new culture and language."

B) What will you do after completing your studies?

My main goal after the completion of my degree program is to return to my home and use the knowledge and skills I have acquired to positively impact my country. I plan on venturing into the private sector and establishing my own company that emphasizes renewable energy production. Various German companies like EnD-I AG, Energiebau, and MP-Tech, who are into solar and wind energy, have expressed their readiness to partner with the private sector in Ghana.

  • Note: It is always important to remember that a student visa is granted with the intention that an applicant will return to his home country after his studies. Even though most students would like to stay permanently in Germany once they complete their studies, this is not what the German government wants. Only an exceptional few are allowed to stay. They are hoping that a large percentage of students will take the knowledge they learned abroad and apply it in their home countries.

C) What will you do with your degree in your home country?

I plan on venturing into the private sector and establishing my own company that emphasizes renewable energy production.

D) Do you wish to remain in Germany after completing your studies, or return to your home country?

I intend to return to my home country and use the knowledge and skills I have learned to make a positive impact in my community.

E) Have you applied for a visa at the German Embassy or any of the Schengen countries before?

No, I have not.

  • Note: Be truthful here. They have all your details at the embassy. The Schengen zone has a unified system and they share information. If you have applied and were denied a visa for, let’s say, the Netherlands, the German embassy automatically gets that information. The fact that you have been denied a visa doesn’t mean your current visa will be denied.

F) Do you have any relatives in Germany?

No, I don’t have any relatives there.

  • Note: If you have immediate relatives in Germany, you should answer honestly. However, there is no need to answer in the affirmative if your relatives in Germany are distant.

G) What do you plan on doing during your semester breaks?

I plan on visiting some tourist attractions in Germany.

  • Note: If you plan on working during holidays, it is smart not to divulge this information.

H) Do you plan to work in Germany?

No. My sole purpose is to study and complete my master’s degree within the given duration.

  • Note: The German Embassy assumes you will not be depending on part-time jobs to finance your studies.

I) How much do you expect to be able to earn after completing your studies?

I haven’t conducted any research into this since my main goal after completing my studies is to return home and use my acquired knowledge to make a difference in my country.

J) Are you aware of the post-study work norms?

No, I am not aware.

4. Questions That Assess Your Financial Situation


Even though tuition is free at most German universities, you still need to be in good financial standing to be able to survive in Germany.

The embassy places huge importance on the financial capability of students. It does not want students to enter Germany and become stranded because they are unable to cope financially. This can force students to neglect their studies altogether and take up jobs. Some may even be forced to resort to criminal activity to get by, and the German government wants to avoid this possibility. Thus, it is important that students prepare for this category of questions and that they answer them to the best of their ability.

A) How will you fund your studies?

I have blocked an amount of €10,236 for one year. My sponsor is willing to support my studies and provide me with €10,236 every year for the duration of my studies.

  • Note: There are five main ways students can prove they have sufficient financial resources at the German Embassy. They are:
  • • 10,236 euros in a blocked account in Germany

    • Recognized scholarships that are funded through German resources in particular

    • Providing a deposit from someone living in Germany who guarantees the Foreigners' Office that they will finance your stay

    • Providing a bank guarantee from a bank institute in Germany

    • If accepted into a German university, presenting proof of your parents' income in the home country

    Please note that most embassies would like to see 10,236 euros in a blocked account in Germany to make sure you are not stranded and the above alternatives to the blocked account do not apply to all embassies. You must, therefore, contact the embassy in your home country to make sure they accept some of these alternatives to the blocked account.

B) Who is sponsoring you?

My uncle is sponsoring me.

  • Note: Your sponsor should not be necessarily related to you. What matters is that he or she should have a good motive for sponsoring you. It is better to choose a non-family member with a strong financial background than a family member with a not so good financial background.

C) What line of work is your sponsor in?

My uncle is the Managing Director of Unilever Ghana Limited. He also runs other private businesses.

D) Where does your sponsor live?

My sponsor lives in Accra, Ghana.

E) What does your father do?

My father is a farmer.

F) What does your mother do?

My mother is an elementary English teacher.

G) Do you have any siblings and, if so, what do they do?

I have one sister. She runs her own printing business.

H) Why aren’t your parents sponsoring you?

My father played a key role in financing the education of my uncle when he was young. Once my uncle had completed his studies and had gained good financial standing, he took it upon himself to finance one of my father's kids. He chose me because of my good academic background and has been sponsoring my education since I was six years of age.

  • Note: If your sponsor isn't closely related to you, he or she should have a very good motive for sponsoring you.

I) What is the annual salary of your sponsor?

The annual salary of my sponsor is around €100,000.

  • Note: Please avoid borrowing large sums of money and dumping it into the account of your sponsor some few months before your interview as the Embassy can easily detect this. It is advisable to choose a person who has had substantial assets and savings in his account for a number of years. Ideally, he or she should earn not less than 3000 euros per month.

J) Does your sponsor have any dependents?

Yes, my sponsor currently has one dependent. However, his salary is more than enough to cater for both me and his other dependent.

  • Note: It is advisable not to choose a sponsor with many dependents. Otherwise, the Embassy might doubt his or her capability to provide you with the required amount of money every year.

K) What are the living expenses in your city for one year?

The living expenses in Duisburg for one year is around €8,500.

  • Note: The living expenses vary from city to city in Germany. In some cities, you will require as little as 400 euros per month whereas in some big cities you will need around 853 euros per month to live comfortably as a student.

I) What plans have you made if your blocked account is expended after one year?

My sponsor has made adequate preparations to immediately fund my account with €10,236 before the money in my blocked account gets to €4,000.

  • Note: Please keep in mind that the German Embassy require students to be financially sound for the entire duration of their studies and not depend on part-time jobs. You should therefore make it clear that you have no intention of relying on part-time jobs to finance your studies.
Dusseldorf Airport

Dusseldorf Airport

Some Useful Tips for Attending the German Student Visa Interview

1. You must be on time on the day of your visa interview. It's advisable to get to know the location of the embassy before the day of your interview. The worst thing that can happen to you is getting lost on the day of your interview.

2. Don't arrive too early for your visa interview. Sitting at the premises of the German Embassy and waiting for hours can make you feel more anxious than you already are. It is advisable to sit at home and watch a movie or listen to a favourite song to calm your nerves. Try not to be more than an hour early for your interview.

3. You should never be late for your interview. Most embassies would refuse you entry anyway if you are late. Even if you are allowed in, you might not present the best version of yourself at the interview. You will go into the interview disoriented, confused and even more anxious.

4. In case you can’t make it to the visa interview due to circumstances beyond your control, try to call the embassy ahead of time and inform them. Sometimes an accident or serious health condition can make it impossible to attend your interview. Try to call or let someone call the embassy on your behalf and possibly reschedule a date.

5. Be friendly and treat everybody you meet at the embassy’s premise with respect because you never know who they are. They might be the one interviewing you.

6. If you can, let someone drive you to the interview or simply take a taxi. Most people are anxious and stressed on this day and this can impair their driving skills. This is also to prevent your car from being a liability to you in case of an unfortunate event. For example, if you take a taxi and you encounter a problem on your way to the interview, you can simply switch and take a new taxi, unlike your car where you have to take other measures.

7. You should wear an outfit that you are comfortable in. If you aren’t comfortable in certain outfits, don’t try to wear them just for the sake of impressing the interviewer as this can distract you during your interview.

8. Try to dress formally and wear something that makes you really confident because you will need all your confidence. Avoid dressing shabbily to the interview and wearing clothes that you would for instance wear if you are going for a walk.

9. Try not to overdress, put on strong fragrances, show too much body parts, or wear too many accessories. Don’t put on accessories or anything with specific discriminating figures or portraits.

10. Make sure to take the complete list of the German student visa supporting documents with you to the embassy. Check the documents at home to make sure everything is set before going for the interview.

11. Get yourself acquainted with some questions that you are likely to encounter during the visa interview. This will help you feel more relaxed and confident.

12. Most German embassies usually require two photocopies of each set of documents and so remember to do this and don’t expect the embassy to do this for you once you arrive.

13. During your interview, your answers should be straight to the point. Avoid beating around the bush. Try to be as honest as possible because most of the time the visa officers can easily verify if what you are saying is true.

14. Avoid getting into an argument with the visa officer. Even if the visa officer seems rude, try to maintain your composure and put your best self out there.

15. If you don’t know an answer to a question, simply say no. Don’t try to make up an answer yourself or try to avoid the question.

16. After the interview, remember to thank the visa officer for his or her time and if you didn’t understand anything that the visa officer asked don’t be afraid to ask for clarification.

Reasons Why the Germany Embassy Denies Visas

One of the first steps to passing your visa interview and securing a student visa is to understand the reasons the German Embassy denies visas. This will prevent you from making the same mistakes. You can find a detailed explanation of those reasons in my other article, where I go over six of the main reasons German student visas are denied.

Good luck!

Questions & Answers

Question: I had my student visa interview recently. The officer asked me whether I would pursue a PhD after completing my masters in Germany. I replied, “If the circumstances are favourable, I may consider." Was that a good answer? Most of the forums I have read state that you need to make them believe you are going to return to your country.

Answer: Telling the visa officer that you intend to pursue your Ph.D. after completing your masters isn’t a big deal, as long as you make it clear that your ultimate goal after completing both your masters and Ph.D. in Germany is to return home and use the knowledge that you have gained to better your home country. Never paint a picture that you intend to stay and work in Germany after completing your studies.

It is always important to remember that a student visa is granted with the intention that an applicant will return to his home country after his studies. Even though most students would like to stay permanently in Germany once they complete their studies, this is not what the German government wants. Only an exceptional few are allowed to stay. They are hoping that a large percentage of students will take the knowledge they learned abroad and apply it in their home countries.

Question: I applied for a student visa for a bachelors degree in Architecture, but was rejected. I would like to apply for a visa again, but this time in a different study field. How will the embassy view this?

Answer: What were the reasons given to you in your rejection letter? If you don’t correct those reasons, it is highly likely your visa would be rejected again. It doesn’t matter if you apply again for a different field of study or not, so far as you haven’t worked on the reasons for the rejection, your visa will likely be rejected again.

Question: What if I intend to work, integrate and stay in Germany after my studies? Should I be honest about it or lie? I know Germany is actually seeking skilled workers because of their aging population.

Answer: I can't tell you to lie or not, but a student visa is granted with the intention that an applicant will return to his home country after his studies.

Question: I would like to know if these questions also apply to students going for language courses in Germany?

Answer: Yeah, most definitely. These are the type of questions that anyone who wants to pursue some form of education in Germany should expect. It doesn't matter if you are going for a language course, bachelors, masters or PhD, your visa interview questions would generally revolve around these type of questions.

Question: I already applied for accommodation in the student dormitories of TH Köln, but I didn’t get any confirmation as of now. I have my visa interview in July. Will this affect me during my interview? I got an email confirmation from the dormitory that I had applied for the accommodation.

Answer: It’s not going to affect your chances of securing a visa. A large proportion of students arrive in Germany without having secured any accommodation. The embassy is aware that getting accommodation can be tough especially in big cities like Munich and Berlin, and that it can take some time for students to get a permanent place of residence after they arrive in Germany.

Question: After finishing A1 from the Goethe Institute in Mumbai, I applied to the Goethe Institute in Berlin for the remaining levels. After paying for both the course fees and accommodation, I applied for a visa interview date. I submitted all receipts from Goethe, Berlin. However, my visa got rejected stating that there are doubts with regards to my purpose of stay. I mentioned in my interview that I want to learn German and will be staying with a German family. What should I do now?

Answer: I would advise you to learn German to a respectable level (at least B2) and apply again. You should prove to the Embassy next time that your intention of going to Germany is strictly to learn the language and that you are not a potential immigrant. You should also prove that you have more than enough money for your stay there.

Question: The accommodation address on my sponsorship letter is different from that of my school and is about 6 hours away from my school. My interview is next month. Will this affect my visa issuance?

Answer: It’s not going to affect your visa issuance in any way. The visa officer knows that in Germany people change their address from time to time and that there is a low probability that you will actually be staying at the address on your sponsorship letter.

Once you arrive in Germany, you will need to register your address within 14 days through a process known as Anmeldung. After registering your address, you will receive your residency registration certificate or Anmeldebestätigung. This is very important as you will need it for your visa extension.

Question: I have secured admission at Phillips University in Germany to study medicine. I have succeeded in blocking the required 8640 euros for the first year. Is it necessary to block this amount of money every year?

Answer: It depends on the Alien Registration Office in your city where you will be studying. Some will require you to block this amount every year. Others will give you a 2-year residence permit which means you will only need to block the 8640 euros every two years. If you are lucky in securing a job that pays 720 euros every month, you don’t need to block 8640 euros every year or 2 years depending on your city. You can extend your visa by show your job contract and monthly pay slips as proof of financial means. Most student jobs only pay around 450 euros though which means you still have to show 3240 euros in your blocked account every year or every two years.

Question: I plan on studying medicine in Germany, so I applied for a language course visa from A1 to C1. I have already completed studying A1 but didn’t take the test. What’s the probability of being granted a language course visa?

Answer: Your probability of getting a language course visa is very low. It is always advisable to learn German to at least B1 before applying for a language course in Germany especially if you intend to study a program like medicine which requires you to have a high level of German proficiency. Also, make sure you write and pass the German language tests. Anyone can say their German language level is B1, but if you don’t have the certificate, it doesn’t prove anything.

Question: Last winter, I had my visa rejected by the German embassy. I applied for a masters program in Sustainable Management. My bachelor's degree was in Social Welfare. The reasons given for the rejection were: 1. Why a second masters degree? 2. Why the change in subject? 3. Why the long distance from your school to your accommodation? I have recently gotten admission to study M.A. Development Studies at the University of Passau. How should I approach the interview this time?

Answer: These are the typical reasons given for the rejection a German student visa, and unless you work on them, there is a high chance your visa will be rejected again.

The first reason, “Why a second masters degree?” is a very common reason for rejection and falls under inconsistency with your choice of study program. You should provide a very tangible reason for going for a second masters program. Below is a good reason given by a student for going for a second master’s degree:

"I initially applied for my dream Ph.D. program at TU-Munich. However, I was denied admission on the basis that I lacked sufficient course content and research in my master's degree. I, therefore, decided to apply for another master's degree to get the necessary course content and research experience to apply for my dream Ph.D. program at TU-Munich."

The second reason, “Why the change in subject?” is a common reason for refusal as well. This also falls under inconsistency with your choice of study program. It is advisable to show solid proof of why you want to study in a new field, which can be in the form of work experience in the new field. I noticed that the recent admission that you received from the University of Passau in M.A. Development Studies is still unrelated to your bachelor's degree. If you don’t provide a valid proof and reason for why you are changing your subject, it is highly likely your visa would be denied again. Below is a good example of a reason given by a student for going for a master’s program that was totally unrelated to his bachelors:

"I had the opportunity to work in the environmental sector for two years. This is where my interest in environmental issues developed. Even though my degree is unrelated to this sector, I believe I have the relevant work experience and passion to succeed in this field."

The third reason, “Why the long distance from your school to your accommodation?” is a somewhat less common reason for rejection and I believe it stems from the first two reasons. If you successfully work on the first two reasons, this reason will take care of itself. The fact that you didn’t satisfy the first two reasons makes them automatically doubt if your true intention is to study and considering that you intend to stay a long distance from your university reaffirms their belief that you have a different agenda for going to Germany. I would advise you to carefully read my article on the reasons for rejection of German student visa in the link below.

https://hubpages.com/academia/Reasons-for-Rejectio...

Question: I finished high school two years ago, and during these two years, I have been learning German here in my country. Now, I have an interview for a German student visa, but I am afraid I might be rejected because I am applying two years after I finished my high school. Is this a possible reason for rejection? My high school grades were very high, but I am still very anxious.

Answer: You haven’t been idle during those two years but have made an effort to learn German which is good. This says something about your work ethic as a student. If you were able to write and pass a German language test, it would be very advantageous to present it at the embassy as proof.

Your visa will only be rejected if you don’t satisfy all the requirements for a student visa. So far as you satisfy all the requirements and have a successful visa interview, you have nothing to be afraid of.

Question: Do I need to submit my blocked account details when attending the student visa interview?

Answer: It varies from embassy to embassy. Some embassies will require you to open a blocked account and submit your blocked account details during the interview. Others will tell you not to open the blocked account until you are done with the interview. It will be best to contact your embassy and inquire about which of these two options they follow. You can usually find this information on the embassy’s website.

Question: I applied for a visa last winter, but could not make it due to some personal reasons (even after getting an approval mail). I mailed the embassy I would be going this year. So, my visa application is still with them. My question is, since my course cannot be offered in the summer semester, I applied for a new course in a different school and city and I want to send the admission letter to the embassy. Do you think this will be a problem?

Answer: No, it’s not going to be a problem. So far as you meet all the requirements like you did the last time, your visa will be granted.

Question: Will I experience any issues if the sponsor of my student visa is a white man?

Answer: The race of your sponsor is not an issue. The most important thing is that he or she can demonstrate a good motive for sponsoring you.

Question: I got admission to study a master’s program in civil engineering at the University of Duisburg-Essen. I am currently 30 years old and would like to know if my age can affect my chances of being granted a visa?

Answer: Your age is not going to be a problem. In fact, Germany is known to have a reputation for having the continent's oldest graduates - on average 28 years old.

Question: Can you give me some tips for attending the German student visa interview?

Answer: 1. You must be on time on the day of your visa interview. It's advisable to get to know the location of the embassy before the day of your interview. The worst thing that can happen to you is getting lost on the day of your interview.

2. Don't arrive too early for your visa interview. Sitting at premises of the German Embassy and waiting for hours can make you feel more anxious than you already are. It is advisable to sit at home and watch a movie or listen to a favourite song to calm your nerves. Try not to be more than an hour early for your interview.

3. You should never be late for your interview. Most embassies would refuse you entry anyway if you are late. Even if you are allowed in, you might not present the best version of yourself at the interview. You will go into the interview disoriented, confused and even more anxious.

4. In case you can’t make it to the visa interview due to circumstances beyond your control, try to call the embassy ahead of time and inform them. Sometimes an accident or serious health condition can make it impossible to attend your interview. Try to call or let someone call the embassy on your behalf and possibly reschedule a date.

5. Be friendly and treat everybody you meet at the embassy’s premise with respect because you never know who they are. They might be the one interviewing you.

6. If you can, let someone drive you to the interview or simply take a taxi. Most people are anxious and stressed on this day and this can impair their driving skills. This is also to prevent your car from being a liability to you in case of an unfortunate event. For example, if you take a taxi and you encounter a problem on your way to the interview, you can simply switch and take a new taxi, unlike your car where you have to take other measures.

7. You should wear an outfit that you are comfortable in. If you aren’t comfortable in certain outfits, don’t try to wear them just for the sake of impressing the interviewer as this can distract you during your interview.

8. Try to dress formally and wear something that makes you really confident because you will need all your confidence. Avoid dressing shabbily to the interview and wearing clothes that you would for instance wear if you are going for a walk.

9. Try not to overdress, put on strong fragrances, show too much body parts, or wear too many accessories. Don’t put on accessories or anything with specific discriminating figures or portraits.

10. Make sure to take the complete list of the German student visa supporting documents with you to the embassy. Check the documents at home to make sure everything is set before going for the interview.

11. Get yourself acquainted with some questions that you are likely to encounter during the visa interview. This will help you feel more relaxed and confident. You can find some of such questions in the link below.

https://owlcation.com/academia/German-Student-Visa...

12. Most German embassies usually require two photocopies of each set of documents and so remember to do this and don’t expect the embassy to do this for you once you arrive.

13. During your interview, your answers should be straight to the point. Avoid beating around the bush. Try to be as honest as possible because most of the time the visa officers can easily verify if what you are saying is true.

14. Avoid getting into an argument with the visa officer. Even if the visa officer seems rude, try to maintain your composure and put your best self out there.

15. If you don’t know an answer to a question, simply say no. Don’t try to make up an answer yourself or try to avoid the question.

16. After the interview, remember to thank the visa officer for his or her time and if you didn’t understand anything that the visa officer asked don’t be afraid to ask for clarification.

Good Luck!

Question: I plan on taking a language course in Germany this year. My problem is that I can’t afford the required 8,640 euros in a blocked account. Is there any other way to go around the blocked account?

Answer: First and foremost, I would advise you to make sure you are financially prepared before you set out to study in Germany. Otherwise, you will run into a whole lot of problems. Most part-time jobs alone will not be enough to cover your monthly expenses and most embassies would like to see 8,640 euros in a blocked account in Germany to make sure you are not stranded. With that being said, the other ways you can prove that you have sufficient financial resources are:

• recognized scholarships that are funded through German resources in particular

• providing a deposit from someone living in Germany who guarantees the Foreigners' Office that they will finance your stay

• providing a bank guarantee from a bank institute in Germany

• if accepted, presenting a proof of your parents' income in the home country

Please note that the above alternatives to the blocked account do not apply to all embassies and you must, therefore, contact the embassy in your home country to make sure they accept some of these alternatives to the blocked account.

Question: My IELTS validation is going to end on the 29th of July, and I am still unable to get a visa appointment due to the overwhelming number of students fighting for the few slots. I am worried that my IELTS certificate might lose its validity by the time I appear for my interview. Will this be an issue at the embassy?

Answer: You can present your IELTS certificate at the embassy even if it is passed its validation date as long as it was the same certificate you used in securing admission. Since a university has granted you admission, this means it was valid during the time of your university application, and that is what matters most.

Question: I'm currently pursuing a masters degree in electrical engineering in Cyprus. I plan on applying for another masters degree in Germany. Do you think I stand a chance of securing admission?

Answer: Admission to masters programs in Germany is quite competitive, and this is mainly due to the tuition-free privilege extended to international students. However, if you have at least a German grade of 2.5 in your bachelor's degree, then there is a high chance you will secure an admission.

Question: I have got an admission letter to study at the University of Paderborn as an international bachelor’s student in transition status for admission to the master program “International Economics and Management.” This means I have been given the opportunity to obtain the missing ECTS-credits required for successful admission into the master program ‘International Economics and Management’ through the BA transition phase. Will this affect my visa application?

Answer: Basically, what you have received is a conditional admission letter to pursue a masters program in International Economics and Management. I don’t think this is going to affect your visa. Try to show the visa officer you are really motivated to study and that you will be able to fulfil the missing requirements in the shortest period of time and go ahead to start with your master's degree if given the opportunity to travel to Germany.

Question: I've recently applied and gotten accepted to an American university in Germany. The university's cost of attendance covers both tuition, room and board, and they have given me a substantial scholarship (but not a full one). Am I still required to open a blocked account? Since the payments to the school include room and board (living expenses).

Answer: It depends on how broad the scholarship is. Remember that you have to take other costs like health insurance, transport, and other unforeseen costs into consideration when calculating your living expenses and not just rent and food. However, I think with your university covering tuition, room and board, as well as giving you a substantial scholarship, it won't be necessary to open a blocked account. Even if you are asked to open it, you won't be required to show the full 8640 euros. I would advise you to contact your embassy and inquire whether it would be necessary to open a blocked account considering your circumstance just to be one hundred percent sure.

Question: I have already secured an appointment for my visa interview. Unfortunately, I have a slight problem with my passport. It will be expiring in five months, and I have registered for my visa appointment with this passport. I would like to get a new passport but afraid that this might complicate things since the embassy has already entered my old passport's number and details into their database. Should I wait and get a new passport after my interview or it would be better to get one before the interview?

Answer: Considering that you only have five months till your passport expires, the best alternative will be to get a new passport before your interview. It’s not that big of a deal. You simply have to notify the German embassy of your new passport details, and they will update your information.

As a student, you initially come to Germany with a visa that is valid for three months/ninety days. Some Embassies might give six months. You then apply to extend your visa after your arrival in Germany. The rule is that your passport must not only be valid on the day you enter Germany but also for three months after that. On the planned date of departure from Germany, your passport should have at least three months validity. Even though as a student you don’t intend to depart from Germany any time soon, the three months visa (or sometimes six months) that you are initially given is more or less like a tourist visa which means your passport and other documents accepted for entry must, therefore, be valid for a minimum of three months beyond the period of your intended stay until you have had your visa extended in Germany.

Since the entire visa process can take several months, it is highly likely your old passport wouldn’t satisfy the three months passport validity requirement by the time your visa is issued, and you leave the borders of your home country to Germany. You therefore run the risk of being denied boarding.

Question: I want to pursue my master’s degree in Germany, but unlike others, I want to do that in the German language. So I plan to take one year of the preparatory course in Germany and then pass the DSH test. Do I have to return to my country again to extend my visa for the master's program that I may study there?

Answer: First and foremost, I would advise you to learn German to a respectable level (at least B1) in your home country before going to take the 1-year preparatory course in Germany. Don’t underestimate the difficulty of the German language and the DSH test. To study successfully in the German language, you need to be really proficient in German and it’s really difficult to achieve this in just one year if you are starting from the scratch.

The DSH is a university language exam which certifies the existence of a German language proficiency sufficient for taking up studies in that language. You normally need an admission to study at a university in order to take the DSH test and is usually part of the requirement to study a degree program in German at a German university.

If you receive an admission to study at a German university, and they invite you to come and take their DSH test in order to study at their university in German, you will be going to Germany with a student visa and hence don’t need to return home once you pass the DSH test since it’s part of the requirement of the course.

On the other hand, if you don’t receive any admission letter from a university, you will need a language visa in order to study the German language in Germany which is totally different from a student visa. In that case, you can’t convert your language visa to a student visa once you are done with your language course and need to return home and apply for a student visa if you are successful in securing admission at a German university.

© 2017 Charles Nuamah

Comments

Onyinyechigift on November 07, 2019:

Please I need advice on this

I applied to the German consulate on 15th of September for visa application appointment since my admission letter came on 29th of September I have apply ahead of time bcos of there delay at times I was yet to get a date and time for my appointment and my enrollment letter stated date is 6/1/2020 the school asked there agent to counsel the appointment on 28/10/2019 that they will hear from them before booking another one since then I have not heard from any of them and my language course date is very close and there is no more time

Onyinyechi on November 07, 2019:

I applied to the German consulate on 15th of September for visa applications appointment since my enrollment letter came in on 29th because I heard I must book early because of the interview date but since then I have not received any date and my course is stated 6/1/2020 now the school said that the booking should be counseled that the agent will hear from them before booking another one since then I have not heard from any of them and there is no more time for me left if am still going with the language course they gave to me

Hafiz Sajid Ali on August 13, 2019:

Hi.... sir my inter(2013) and matric(2010) results are 55% and 61% respectively... my IELTS(2018) is 6.0 overall.... i have work experience in an academy and a business experience at a college that gap....... my age is 27.... are there chances of rejection on the basis of gap or low results in 10th or 12yh??????

SHINO on August 13, 2019:

Hope you're doing good.

I'm from India but currently working in Qatar. I will attend the visa appointment from Qatar. In the German embassy website, it is given that the document must be legalized. Due to some circumstances, later I have known about the legalization of documents. So my concern is which legalization is required on the documents.

Ifeanyi on July 26, 2019:

Hi Chris,

Chill, you get a date say 2/3rd week in August as I was in same situation as yours.

Chris Nwagod on July 26, 2019:

Please i need an advice on this,

i applied to the german consulate on 8 of july for vias appliction appointment since my addmission letter came on 29 of june, but am yet to get a date and time for my appointment, my course is starting on 3rd of September 2019

Vivian on July 08, 2019:

I have secured admission with tum , masters in education and my bachelors degree is in education, since 2008 , i have been working as an admin staff in a polytethnic since 2013, but my salary was stopped in 2016, but my appiontment letter i still with me now my question is : 1. Do i need to present my self as a worker, 2.i openend my blocked account since nov, 2018 when i wanted to go for language course in germany , and the money is stil there , will it affect my visa process?

Evans on June 27, 2019:

I am preparing for my visa interview but I'm bothered with the following questions on the Visa Application Form:

1-Do you intend to maintain your permanent residence outside the Federal Republic of Germany?

2-Residence permit number

3-i-What are your means of subsistence?

ii-Do you have health insurance that covers the Federal Republic of Germany?

And I'm a Ghanaian, who has not travelled to Germany before.

Again, among my checklist is:

1-A signed Declaration of German Residence

Loide on May 24, 2019:

I have applied for a language course in Germany and my appontment is in 3 days, what do i say if asked why I'm not taking the german language course in my country?

EMMANUEL on May 10, 2019:

I’ve gone for my visa interview about a month and some weeks ago, but the embassy has called me for a second interview. I seriously don’t know what I will tell the consular Officer again after taking all my original passport and documents. Kindly advice cos I’m anxious.

Vivian on February 27, 2019:

I have already booked an appiontment in the embassy for language course that will last for two weeks and i have already opened a blocked account. But my major question is what if am asked in the interview why i did not do the course in my country what will i answer

nista on February 23, 2019:

Hello, my grandfather and parents are sponsoring my studies so do I need a bank statement during the interview to prove that my parents and grandfather are capable of sponsoring?

Saini on January 07, 2019:

I am 47 years old, a post graduate in zoology in 1994. Having an experience of 15 years in Pharma industry. Currently working with a German company who has given me additional responsibility to expand business in few other countries. I have visited Germany on Schengen business visa many times, never over stayed. Now I want to do MBA Global from Germany to update my knowledge to start business in other countries. What are my chances of getting a student visa

Hannes on October 09, 2018:

Hello,

I had my appointment already at the German embassy in my home country for the school winter session. But few days later the embassy called me to write to my school for them to extend my enrollment date .but unfortunately the school refused to extend the date and stated i am still welcome to apply again next year. I then forwarded the the schools response to the embassy.

Then few days later again, the embassy called me and said it wasn't possible for them to process my application before the enrollment deadline stated on my admission letter and that I should only bring a new admission letter next year, and that there's no need for me to book a new appointment to begin the whole visa process all over as i only need to bring just the admission letter.

Now my fear is that ,when the school issues me a new admission letter , would it be necessary for me to book a new appointment and begin the whole visa procedure again as they might forget that they told me to bring just my new admission letter.

Thanks

ifeanyiuzorudo on October 06, 2018:

Hello,

How do i please convince a consular that i will be returning even after starting it during interview

ifeanyiuzorudo on October 06, 2018:

Hello intelligent bruv,

I had my visa rejected for been not serious... and I intend re-applying again but had been preparing assiduously...need your perfect answers on this ...now my question are

1. what are your plans for accommodation?

2. I seem to have forgotten my project topic, what's your take on this please?

3. Who's funding you? Am founding myself and still have my blocked account left at Fintiba..whats your would be your perfect response to this please?

4.Is this program relevant to your previous study? My bachelor degree was on Geology..How do I please go about answering this?

Sushma on September 08, 2018:

Hi,

I have a bacheolar degree in nursing and i got admission for pursuing master degree in international health care management.Does this change in subject will affect my visa? But the field is same (health sector). And i got admission in private university. Does it also affect my visa?

James Gift on September 05, 2018:

I applied for a student visa for a bachelor's degree in logistics,winter semester but was rejected... I had two admission from different schools in Germany, I would like to apply for visa again but on a different study field...can it be possible.

gilson on August 30, 2018:

hi,

I got a conditional offer letter from TU Chemnitz.actually my program taught in English and i have IELTS score 6.5.but university insists to have German A1 when enrolling. and I applied to the university without A1.and the university offered me to a preparatory course on the start of September and I cant attended that and i am booked a date to write the A1 exam before going. Right now I have a visa interview on 15th. Is there any chance for rejection when appearing with this offer letter

Fahim Siddique on August 08, 2018:

Hello. I have completed my Bachelors of Business Administration degree majoring in Marketing and International Business. Now, I have applied in German university for my Masters program in Management & Technology, Consumer Science and Global Supply Chain management. I have not received my offer letter yet but I am hopeful. So, what is the best reply if the visa officer asked me why I choose this particular subject for my Masters? Can I say this masters program is related to my bachelors degree, as marketing and management are business subjects?

Thank you

Folashade on May 08, 2018:

Thanks charles. This is really helpful.

UFOKA AMBA FRED on February 11, 2018:

Charles thanks for your visa questions and answers.They are helpful

Marie on January 26, 2018:

Hi

I got admission at the germany university on Jan 15 and my course is been taught in english. I have a booking at the consulate on the 31 of Jan. But i have 2 problems. First my IELTS has expired and my bank account opening is still in the process. What should i do?. Cancel the appointment or go to the consulate and explain things over there?

Ivan from Zagreb on August 01, 2017:

Very precise :-) Almost as Germans :-)

Thanks for great article