Good Attention-Getters for Speeches

Updated on October 3, 2018
Dr. Poeta Diablo profile image

As a professional in the education industry for over 10 years, I believe knowledge should be made available to all willing students.

Photo taken by lunchtimemama
Photo taken by lunchtimemama

Grabbing the Reader's Attention in Persuasive Speeches

Do you want to catch the audience's attention in an instant? Need a magic word to make everyone listen attentively to every single word that follows?

You must be able to capture the listener's attention with an effective attention-getter in the first few seconds of your speech. Good attention-getters for speeches do just that, and there are many different types to choose from. Below are some of the best examples you can use. Whether you are doing a persuasive or an informative speech, these are all great.

1. Give a Bold Statement

"I have a dream!"

These are considered the most famous words in the world of public speaking, spoken by Martin Luther King, Jr. The energy and passion you use when you start off with a bold statement like this will cause your listeners to be instantly enticed. They will pay close attention to how you back up your leading statement. One attention-grabbing example is the opening line: "Anyone can get big biceps fast!"

2. Tell a Story

By starting off with an interesting story, your audience will want to know what happened next and how things played out. For example, you can something like:

  • "Just as I thought, the boy did exactly what I said..."

Everyone will want to know what the boy did, and what it was that you said.

  • "Everything was calm, and then suddenly, a shadow approached..."

Who did the shadow belong to? Are you in danger? Guide them through your story so they are constantly on the edge of their seats, eager to learn what happens next. You could make up a story or use a real life example, such as a holiday or something funny that happened to you.

3. Funny Attention-Getters

Laughing is a sign that people are happy and interested in what you are saying. This can make or break your speech, whether you are in front of the class or behind a podium. If you are able to trick people into laughing, you are getting them to think that they are actually interested in what you have to say. This is why funny speech introductions can be useful.

The perfect example would be something that the class is able to understand, such as an inside joke. If you know the teacher has a tendency to misspell words, you can try a lighthearted, funny joke to start with. For example, "Wouldn't it be nice if Mr. Johns could spell the word "outrageous" correctly for once? That would be outrageous!" Not only would you get the attention of the class, but you are guaranteed to get the attention of the teacher, who is the main judge and the one giving you the mark!

4. Help the Audience Understand With Examples

Starting off informative speeches in the right way is crucial. You need to ensure that you not only have the listeners' attention, but that they understand what you are trying to explain. Examples are a very useful way to do this.

Use comparing adjectives, similes and metaphors to help your audience understand what you are talking about, and try to relate your topic to your audience. Most people won't be interested in employment policies, but they will be more interested in how those policies could affect them personally. You could also use everyday items when making comparisons, such as: "Even warmer than a sheepskin jacket," or "More versatile than even the best set pots and pans."

5. Your Delivery

Be enthusiastic in the way you deliver your attention-grabbing lines. Don't mumble or say anything without energy, or you risk the audience receiving your lines without any enthusiasm. Use your voice smartly, vary your tone and start off with a bang.

You could even yell the first sentence! This will cause everyone's neck will snap to your attention as they try to figure out what in the world is going on. Whatever you do, don't deliver your speech in the same way as all the other speakers, or else you will be just that: the same as all the other speakers.

How To Give a Speech Without Saying Anything

© 2010 Dr. Poeta Diablo

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      luna 

      2 days ago

      nice I love iiiiiiiiit

    • profile image

      Mark 

      5 years ago

      got some great ideas out of this, thank you!

    • profile image

      Sarah 

      8 years ago

      this helped thanks

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, owlcation.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://owlcation.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)