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When Parents Can't Afford College

Updated on December 21, 2016

College confidential is one of my favorite online forums. That's because I have two teenagers, both interested in furthering their education.

Many of my preconceived notions about college, and the admissions process, were dashed when, a couple of years ago, I first began reading some of the posts. Most enlightening was the information on paying for college.

Somehow, even though my own children were already high school, I was extremely naïve about the matter of financing an education. I had assumed it would all work out. If your family income was low, but your child was bright, the institute would help your child attend.

This used to be the case, for the most part. That was back when financial aid was more plentiful. Now, though, with endowments sagging, scholarships and grants are harder to come by. Loans, however, are readily given out to both parents and students.

Sometimes even the loans are not enough. The sad reality is that, if you don't have the money, your child may not be able to attend a particular school, no matter how much he or she wants to go.

The Spring Awakening

Each spring, a new group of students and parents stumble upon College Confidential, moderated by a woman named Sally Rubenstone. As a former admissions counselor at an elite private school, she is very knowledgeable about the college admissions process and she is extremely generous with her time and recommendations. Many of the long-time parents who frequent her forum give excellent advice as well.

If someone cannot afford to go to a particular school, these forum veterans tell it like it is. No four-year degree, they say, is worth taking on $100,000 or more of debt. Some students may have landed a good package at a particular institute. But they might like another college much better, even if it will cost them tens of thousands of dollars more every year. They are typically steered these teenagers to the institute where they can graduate with the fewest loans.

There are frequent posts from students accepted to a number of colleges. However, there isn't one on the list that they can afford. In this case, they are either steered to a community college or told to either take a gap year and then apply to a wide range of schools next year, while retaining their freshmen status.

Parents Who Now Need to Say "No"

Until recently, most parents assumed they'd be paying for their children's college education. If not in full, then at least for a large chunk of it. However, unabated tuition increases have destroyed that model for many families. With the price of a four-year degree at many colleges now exceeding $240,000, this has become impossible.

Even though we often hear that this is only the "sticker price," and that schools give discounts, even a 50 percent reduction in the tuition bill isn't enough to make it affordable. Most families still can't pay $120,000 for a degree, for each of their children.

Some of the students who ask for advice have very sad stories. One student posted that his mother couldn't afford to pay the amount she owed on this year's taxes. He wasn't sure what would happen to his financial aid.

Unless this person is a stellar student, it's apparent that no amount of financial aid is going to be enough to cover the cost of college.

Another soon-to-be community college graduate was thinking of transferring to complete a degree. However, this was coupled with the stark realization that his parents couldn't help him out. So, going anywhere was not a possibility.

A Glossary of College Common Terms

Expected Family Contribution
Federal Student Loans
Parent PLUS Loans
Often called EFC, for short, this is the amount the federal government has determined you can afford for a child's college tuition.
These are government loans issued to students. Families who qualify, based in income, can receive "subsidized" loans that don't accrue interest until after graduation.
These are federal loans issued to parents to meet the costs of tuition, room and board.
 
 
 
 
 
 

What is an Expected Family Contribution?

The Expected Family Contribution, or EFC, is the amount the government believes you should be able to pay each year for education. This figure drops accordingly, if you have multiple children in college. But it isn't halved for each child. Many parents find they'll have grave difficulty even meeting this figure.

There is also a widespread misconception that a school won't charge more than you can afford. Some colleges do claim to meet "full need," and only expect you to pay the EFC, or less. Most other schools, though, don't reduce the bill so it's more in line with what you can afford.

At this point, if you decide to proceed with your plans to attend this institute, you'll need to come up with additional funding. If you don't have the cash, you may have to tap into your retirement account or your home equity line. You may also be able to take out what's known as a Parent PLUS loan, although these are risky because credit limits are very flexible, and you may be given much more money than what you can realistically pay back.

Talking About it Beforehand Can Prevent Disappointment Later

Source

Preventing this Scenario

A growing number of parents seem to be having talks with their children beforehand about what they can affordfor college. Some students are being given a set sum of money and told to spend it wisely. (This is what we are doing with our children.)

So, if a child chooses a very expensive college, he or she will have to find a way to make it possible to attend. Just getting accepted today isn't enough. The financial aid package also has to be in line with a family's financial status.

It must be heartbreaking for a parent whose child has worked hard in high school, and to then have gained admittance to an elite university, to have to say, "no," we can't afford to send you there. Of, even worse, having the child attend, but not being able to stay to complete the degree.

Having a talk with your child beforehand can prevent a lot of the unrealistic expectations and inevitable disappointment.

How Much Can Students Borrow?

Students are eligible to borrow Federal Student loans. But there is a cap. Freshman can borrow $5,500, a sophomore can borrow $6,500 and juniors and seniors may borrow up to $7,500 a year. Private lenders will usually not approve student loans unless a parent or another financially stable adult will cosign.

Defaulting on a student loan is serious business. If your name is on the loan, you are responsible, even if your child has promised to repay the entire amount. Student loan debt cannot be discharged in bankruptcy court. Even if you default, the interest will continue to grow.

This is a debt that will never go away and the lenders will always attempt to be repaid, even if it means garnishing your wages, tax returns or your Social Security check.

PBS Documentary on the Student Loan Crisis

Make Sure You Have a Safety School

Because of the uncertainties about how to pay for college, many experts recommend applying to at least two safety schoolsthat are highly likely to accept you. For most people, this is a state college they can commute to, if they don't receive enough financial aid that allows them to attend another school and live on campus.

Many students every year neglect to do this. Then, when they realize how much they have to pay to attend the school of their choice, they are left without any other options, aside from their local community college.

One of our best jobs as parents is to teach our children responsibility. Signing up for something that has little chance of being paid back is very irresponsible.

A College Education is Increasingly Expensive

Source

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  • FlourishAnyway profile image

    FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

    It seems reasonable to set expectations with a child early by telling them how much the family can afford to contribute. Sadly, it may be nothing.

    There are other types of scenarios in life that show us that just because you can technically get approved through the process, it doesn't mean it's the sensible thing to do in the long run personally (e.g., certain mortgages). So often we hear about famous people who went to Harvard or Stanford. It might be interesting to do a hub about very successful grads of state or lesser known schools.

  • Ericdierker profile image

    Eric Dierker 3 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

    Sorry if this is rude. If they cannot get a scholarship to a college/university they should not go.

  • ologsinquito profile image
    Author

    ologsinquito 3 years ago from USA

    Hi Eric, it does seem that way, but there is still great societal pressure to attend "the best" school. Many parents are finding it extremely difficult to say "no."

  • ologsinquito profile image
    Author

    ologsinquito 3 years ago from USA

    I forgot to say thank you for reading. I always appreciate your insight.

  • ologsinquito profile image
    Author

    ologsinquito 3 years ago from USA

    FlourishAnyway, that's a good idea for an article. You are correct, it is not sensible to take on more debt than you can repay. Most borrowing has limits, but the limits are nearly nonexistent on these Parent loans.

  • Elearn4Life profile image

    Darlene Matthews 3 years ago

    Every child that WANTS to go to school should. Uneducated adults put a strain on our economy when not armed with the skills to find jobs.

    There are so many people affected economically today that parents have no choice but to say NO. However there are other options for further training. Start researching and never stop.

    Work hard in school to earn grants and scholarships. Seek loans and work to save for future college courses.

    - Job Corp will help assist a child up to 24 years of age.

    -One Stop or Workforce Investment Act is in every state and will assist with a grant up to $7,000 for an associate.

    - Joining the reserves or military is how countless people pay for tuition.

  • ologsinquito profile image
    Author

    ologsinquito 3 years ago from USA

    Oh yes, in no way was I implying that someone shouldn't go to school. A college degree is more necessary than ever. However, there are many other options. Working hard in school to earn grants and scholarships is the best approach. What is frightening is the deep debt for a family that cannot afford it. The number one reason for students dropping out of college is lack of money.

  • Ericdierker profile image

    Eric Dierker 3 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

    I am just gonna call you Olly after a bestf friend. This hub really is good for people to read and ponder. I have six kids that "we" helped raise and only one has job related to their degree. My doctorate is worth it to me. But not to anyone else. My momma was proud. My daddy with 3 doctorates was sad I bought into the system.

    Olly I would rather these folk grow organic corn than go to college.

  • ologsinquito profile image
    Author

    ologsinquito 3 years ago from USA

    As long as people are happy with what they are doing, then they are doing the right thing. A college degree can open doors. People pretty much need one now to survive, unless they have a specific skill or trade.

  • ologsinquito profile image
    Author

    ologsinquito 3 years ago from USA

    Elearn4Life, I have to remove those links, because I don't want links in my comments. But thank you for reading.

  • DDE profile image

    Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

    I know what that is like not being able to afford to send a child to college but somehow my child makes that effort for himself he has a summer job and pays for his education.

  • ologsinquito profile image
    Author

    ologsinquito 3 years ago from USA

    A summer job can definitely help. I hope my child finds suitable employment this summer too.

  • AliciaC profile image

    Linda Crampton 3 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

    Attending a college can be so expensive. I feel very sorry for the students who graduate from high school today, especially those whose families have low incomes. The hubs that you write on the topic are very useful, ologsinquito. Students and parents need all the help that they can get.

  • Faith Reaper profile image

    Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

    College is outrageously expensive today. My daughter attended the college she wanted to attend and it was a hefty price to the tune of $100,000 and she is not even working in the field of her degree. Just the cost of books is ridiculous too! That is a sad reality. If I had to do it all over again, I would not do it, and she would need to work her way through college to appreciate what she has done. There are so many bright students who will never darken the doors of a college, sadly. But in this day, it does give one pause to think much harder about the field of study one would need to get into that is most beneficial to one's future.

    Up and more, tweeting, pinning

    Great hub.

    Blessings,

    Faith Reaper

  • ologsinquito profile image
    Author

    ologsinquito 3 years ago from USA

    Hi Faith Reaper, thanks so much for reading and for sharing. Some people get upset when they hear this message, but people also need to know about what will happen if they get deeply into debt. There are very few jobs for new graduates in many of the fields. Thank you also for sharing your perspective and regrets. This will help a lot of people.

  • DDE profile image

    Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

    Hi ologsinquito the summer job has helped my son to pay for college fees and still manage to live through the winter until he goes back to work again this summer it is helpful. Thank you for sharing such interesting hubs.

  • ologsinquito profile image
    Author

    ologsinquito 3 years ago from USA

    HI DDE, thank you for reading. Your son is fortunate to have found a summer job. Good for him.

  • MsDora profile image

    Dora Isaac Weithers 3 years ago from The Caribbean

    Very useful for parents and college-age children. You unwrap the facts and lay them bare. You also give helpful information. Voted Up!

  • ologsinquito profile image
    Author

    ologsinquito 3 years ago from USA

    Hi MsDora, thanks so much for reading and voting. We seem to be caught in the middle of a new reality, where many students still believe that heavy debt is a good investment in their future. It's usually not.

  • Suzanne Day profile image

    Suzanne Day 3 years ago from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

    A lot of common sense in this hub and I like the idea of getting your kids to spend the money wisely and work it out themselves, rather than them not knowing what's going on and blaming the parent. It's alarming what an education can cost these days, and unless a child has serious desires to become that doctor or lawyer of their own accord, I personally would try to help my children try to get into industries through other, less expensive back doors. Voted useful and up.

  • ologsinquito profile image
    Author

    ologsinquito 3 years ago from USA

    Hi Suzanne, thanks so much for reading. It's such a dilemma because a college education is now the barrier to entry for many jobs, so a four-year degree is still needed. However, even though the value of such a degree has come down, the cost has become astronomical.

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