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10 Chinese Myths to Know For Your China Vacation

Updated on September 19, 2016
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Middle age "otaku" from Singapore. With interest in games, movies, books, and anything mythological.

10 Chinese myths to know for any Chinese holiday!
10 Chinese myths to know for any Chinese holiday!

While there is certainly no shortage of material, it is challenging to write a list of “top 10” Chinese myths. There are two reasons for this:

  1. The best-known Chinese myths are not myths in the Western definition of the word. They are written works of fiction that became so popular and enduring, the Chinese started regarding them as legends. Many of the characters in these stories have also been immortalised, and are actively worshiped today.
  2. A lot of characters in Chinese myths have actual historical counterparts. This creates the curious situation of there being a historical version of things (i.e. the insipid version), and the mythical, magical version. Naturally, this list emphasises the latter, more enchanting version.

Without further ado, here are ten Chinese myths that I think would be useful for tourists visiting China to know. These stories are frequently referenced in art, architecture and cultural performances. You would find such references all over China, and in any other community with a significant Chinese population.

1. Journey to the West (西游记 xi you ji)

The most famous character in Chinese myths, Monkey God Sun Wukong with his magical rod.
The most famous character in Chinese myths, Monkey God Sun Wukong with his magical rod. | Source

Easily the most famous Chinese myth, Journey to the West narrates the adventure of the legendary Monkey King Sun Wukong (孙悟空), one of the most beloved characters in Chinese mythology.

Written in the 16th century by Wu Cheng’en (吳承恩), the story was based on the pilgrimage of the Tang Dynasty Monk Xuan Zang (玄奘), who travelled to the “Western Regions” (India) in search of Buddhist scriptures. According to researchers, Xuan Zang had various pets during his journeys. In the fictionalised version, these pets became Sun Wukong, Zhu Bajie (猪八戒) and Sha Wujing (沙悟净). Together, the magical trio defended Xuan Zang against numerous demons who sought to feast on the monk to achieve immortality.

In total, Xuan Zang and his disciples faced a total of 72 “calamities” before reaching the West. Many, Chinese gods, goddess and bodhisattvas frequently intervened during these 72 mini stories. For example, Sun Wukong often relied on the assistance of Guan Yin (观音), the Bodhisattva of Mercy. The most well-known segments of Journey to the West, however, are the earliest chapters, which focused on the exploits of Sun Wukong. In these, Sun Wukong achieved great power through Taoist practice. He subsequently wreaked havoc on heaven, defeating entire armies of heavenly soldiers with his Ru Yi Bang (如意棒), a magical rod that could morph to any size which Sun stole from Dragon King of the Eastern Sea.

Sun was only subdued after he failed a task issued by Gautama Buddha. The Buddha had challenged Sun to somersault out of his palm. The arrogant Monkey King thought nothing of this, as he had the ability to traverse thousands of miles in a leap. In the end, Sun Wukong never even managed to leave the heart of the Buddha’s palm. As punishment for his mischief, Sun was imprisoned under a magical mountain formed by the Buddha’s palm for 500 years. His final atonement was also to accompany and protect Xuan Zang, during the latter’s quest for sacred Buddhist scriptures.

Interesting to know:

  • Zhu Bajie, the second disciple, had the face of a pig, and was lazy, greedy and lascivious. A recurrent joke of the story involved him getting into trouble because of his shortcomings, followed by the resourceful Sun Wukong bailing him out.
  • Several modern Chinese sayings originated from Journey to the West. For example, “the inability to escape from the mountain of my hand.” (逃不出我的五指山 tao bu chu wo de wu zhi shan) This saying came from how Su Wukong, despite his formidable abilities, could not even leap out of the hand of the mighty Buddha.
  • In 1942, Arthur Waley published a translated version of the story titled Monkey: A Folk-Tale of China. In this, the main characters are given anglicised names of Tripitaka, Monkey, Pigsy, and Sandy.
  • Many Chinese today worship Sun Wukong as the Fighting Buddha (斗战胜佛 dou zhan sheng fo) or the Great Sage Equalling Heaven. The latter title is based on Sun’s official Taoist title in the story. (齐天大圣 qi tian da sheng)
  • Many, many Asian TV dramas and movies are based on the Chinese myth of Journey to the West. Several Japanese manga and anime series also drew inspiration from the series.

Sun Wukong often appears in Chinese opera performances too!
Sun Wukong often appears in Chinese opera performances too! | Source
Statue of Xuan Zang in modern day Xi'an city.
Statue of Xuan Zang in modern day Xi'an city. | Source
The Great Wild Goose Pagoda in Xian. This ancient structure once held the sutras brought back to China by Xuan Zang.
The Great Wild Goose Pagoda in Xian. This ancient structure once held the sutras brought back to China by Xuan Zang. | Source

One of Many Movies Based on Journey to the West

2. Hou Yi, Chang'e, and the Rabbit of the Moon (嫦娥奔月chang e ben yue)

Hou Yi saved the world, but earned himself a terrible fate.
Hou Yi saved the world, but earned himself a terrible fate. | Source

Hou Yi (后羿) was a ancient God of Archery in Chinese myths. During his time, there was not one, but ten suns surrounding the world. The offspring of the God of the Eastern Heaven, these suns took turns illuminating the world. Each day, one sun would rise and shine upon the Earth. Harmony and balance was thus ensured.

Unfortunately, the suns eventually tired of this rigid schedule. They decided to all rise at the same time. This quickly plunged the world into a frightful drought. To save his people, the Emperor of China appealed to mighty Hou Yi to teach the suns a lesson. Furious at the mass suffering around him, Hou Yi proceeded to shoot down nine of the suns. He would have also shot down the final one, had the Emperor not informed him that destroying that final one would forever remove light from the world.

The world was thus saved. But through his actions, Hou Yi earned himself a terrible enemy. The God of the Eastern Heaven was furious that Hou Yi killed nine of his boys and in revenge, he banished Hou Yi from heaven and stripped him of his immortality. To restore himself, Hou Yi sought the help of the Divine Mother of the West, who pitied him, and gave him a precious elixir of immortality. Sadly, for reasons unknown, Hou Yi did not consume the elixir immediately. While out vanquishing more monsters, his wife Chang'e (嫦娥) found the elixir and ate it. The elixir immediately transfigured Chang'einto an immortal and she ascended to the moon palace. There, she would spend the rest of eternity, accompanied by only a rabbit. Hou Yi never saw his wife again.

Interesting to know:

  • The Chinese “commemorate” Chang'e’s ascension by celebrating Mid-Autumn Festival. This is held on the fifteenth day of the eighth lunar month. Throughout that month, the Chinese eat mooncakes, or offer them as gifts.
  • No thanks to NASA’s visit of the actual, barren moon, the story is somewhat of a joke nowadays with Chinese people. Fortunately, the huge amounts of money involved with making and selling mooncakes keeps this Chinese myth alive.
  • In Journey to the West, Zhu Bajie or Pigsy was cursed into his awful form as punishment for sexually harassing the Goddess of the Moon. This goddess is taken to be Chang'e.

Artistic depiction of Chang' e.
Artistic depiction of Chang' e. | Source
Traditional Chinese mooncakes. Nowadays, mooncakes come with all sorts of fillings and crusts.
Traditional Chinese mooncakes. Nowadays, mooncakes come with all sorts of fillings and crusts. | Source

3. Investiture of the Gods (封神演义 feng shen yan yi)

The many magical characters in Feng Shen Yan Yi provides the perfect premise for many movies, games and TV series.
The many magical characters in Feng Shen Yan Yi provides the perfect premise for many movies, games and TV series. | Source

Like Journey to the West, Investiture of the Gods was written in 16th Century Ming Dynasty. The author is believed to be Xu Zhonglin (许仲琳), and the inspiration for his masterpiece were the tumultuous events leading to the establishment of the ancient Zhou Dynasty.

The story took place in the final days of the Shang Dynasty (商朝). The emperor of then, Zhou Wang (纣王), was a ruthless, womanising tyrant. He was also notorious for having an evil concubine named Da Ji (妲己), who was said to be the human form of a nine-tailed vixen. Together, the wicked duo committed many infernal acts, such as ripping out unborn babies to make magical elixirs, or grilling righteous couriers to death with super-heated copper pillars. Their brutality soon resulted in an uprising, spearheaded by the noble House of Ji (姬). Many magical warriors, sages and deities subsequently became involved in the extended struggle.

With the capital and the imperial army under him, Zhou Wang seemingly had an upper hand in the conflict. However, the House of Ji enjoyed the assistance of Jiang Ziya (姜子牙), an elderly sage destined to appoint deities, but never to be one himself. Through Jiang’s strategy and “connections,” many powerful characters were recruited to fight for the House of Ji. After many magical battles, the conflict ended with the capital conquered and Zhou Wang forced to commit suicide. The wicked Da Ji and her nefarious sisters were also executed on advice of Jiang Ziya.

Interestingly, and akin to Journey to the West, many Chinese are only familiar with one of the mini stories found at the beginning of the work. This involved Nezha’s (哪吒), the third son of one of Zhou Wang’s generals. Said to be the reincarnation of a divine being, Nezha was birthed with all sorts of fantastic weapons, such as a golden ring, a magical brick, and a “heaven befuddling” sash. The hot-headed and powerful Nezha soon got himself and his family into much trouble, the worst being his slaying of a son of the Dragon King.

To atone for his crimes, Nezha committed suicide before his family and enemies. Thankfully, he was soon reincarnated, again, with his body remade from lotus. To ensure he behaves, his father, General Li Jing (李靖), was given a magical pagoda. This golden artifact could imprison Nezha at any time. It works on other lifeforms too.

Interesting to know:

  • Many Chinese artworks nowadays feature Jiang Ziya in his most renowned form. That of a raggedly dressed old man with a fishing rod.
  • Zhou Wang (纣王) and Zhou Dynasty (周朝) have the same anglicised spellings. However, they are different words with different intonations in Chinese. Take note!
  • In a way, Investiture of the Gods was the Chinese version of the Trojan War. It was named as such because many of the characters in the story were transfigured into deities after the war.
  • Nezha and his dad appeared in Journey to the West too. Both lost to Sun Wukong during the latter’s battle with heaven.
  • Li Jing, with his pagoda, is formally titled Tuo Ta Tian Wang (托塔天王). Those familiar with Japanese myths would immediately notice his physical resemblance to the Japanese guardian, Bishamon.
  • Investiture of the Gods was made into several Japanese animes and games.
  • Many warriors and sages in Investiture of the Gods are Taoist representations of Buddhist Bodhisattvas. This points at the usually peaceful co-existence of Taoism and Buddhism throughout Chinese history.

Nezha is worshiped by many Taoists today as San Taizi, or the Third Prince.
Nezha is worshiped by many Taoists today as San Taizi, or the Third Prince. | Source
Feng Shen Yan Yi is very popular in Japanese game culture too.
Feng Shen Yan Yi is very popular in Japanese game culture too. | Source

Crossover?

Given Journey to the West and Investiture of the Gods were both written in the Ming Dynasty, were the crossovers the authors' way of acknowledging each other? Such crossovers frequently occur in Chinese myths.

4. Madam White Snake (白蛇传 bai she zhuan)

Madam White Snake is considered classic repertoire in Chinese opera.
Madam White Snake is considered classic repertoire in Chinese opera. | Source

Various Chinese myths about the white snake existed in oral tradition for a long time before they were was put into writing. Most historians now believe Feng Menglong’s (冯梦龙) version to be the earliest written one.

The story revolved around the marriage of young doctor Xu Xian (许仙) to Madam White (白娘子), the latter being a white snake spirit in human form. Despite being what she was, Madam White was kind and caring, and she genuinely loved her husband. Unfortunately, the exorcist monk Fa Hai (法海) strongly disapproved upon discovering the marriage, to say the least. To break up the couple, Fa Hai kidnapped Xu Xian and imprisoned him in the Temple of the Golden Mount (金山寺 jin shan si). Desperate to rescue her husband, Madam White and her companion Xiao Qing (小青) assaulted the temple with an army of allies. They also summoned a massive flood to besiege the temple.

While she did it out of love, Madam White’s flood inevitably caused the death of many. To punish her for her many “sins,” Fa Hai imprisoned Madam White in a magical tower (雷峰塔 lei feng ta) after defeating her. Here, Madam White would languish for many years till freed by Mengjiao (夢蛟), her son with Xu Xian. In some other versions, Xiao Qing was the one who freed her. She accomplished this after fleeing from Fa Hai, and strengthening her magic through many years of devoted cultivation.

Interesting to know:

  • Madam White’s mortal name was Bai Suzhen (白素贞).
  • Without surprise, Fa Hai is detested by many Chinese. Especially children. (Family wrecker!)
  • The Legend of the White Snake has been featured in many TV series, operas and movies. The latest movie version stars Jet Li as Fa Hai. In almost every version, Madam White is portrayed as the victim, rather than a wicked serpent seductress.
  • The Temple of the Golden Mount and Lei Feng Ta are actual places tourists can visit in the Jiangnan area of China today. Their popularity almost entirely stands on the Legend of Madam White Snake.

The reconstructed Lei Feng Ta, or Thunder Peak Pagoda. The original collapsed over a century ago.
The reconstructed Lei Feng Ta, or Thunder Peak Pagoda. The original collapsed over a century ago. | Source

The 2011 Film Adaptation of Bai She Zhuan. Starring Jet Li

5. The Eight Immortals Cross the Eastern Sea (八仙过海 ba xian guo hai)

The Eight Immortals is a very popular motif in Chinese art.
The Eight Immortals is a very popular motif in Chinese art. | Source

The Eight Immortals are a group of famous Taoist deities. In Chinese art and worship, they are typically represented by the mythical instruments they wield.

  • Li Tieguai (李铁拐) – Represented by crutches, as he was lame. Guai means crutches in Chinese.
  • Han Zhongli (汉钟离) – Represented by a large Chinese fan.
  • Lü Dongbin (吕洞宾) – Represented by twin swords.
  • He Xiangu (何仙姑) – Represented in art by a lotus blossom.
  • Lan Caihe (蓝采和) – Represented in art by a flower basket.
  • Han Xiangzi (韩湘子) – Represented in art by a flute.
  • Zhang Guolao (张果老) – Represented in art by a Chinese fish drum, and riding a mule.
  • Cao Guojiu (曹国舅) – Represented in art by Chinese castanets.

(How the Eight achieved immortality involves a whole series of myths that you can read here.)

The most famous story of the Eight Immortals is that of them crossing the Eastern Ocean. During this journey, they entered into a conflict with the Dragon King, with the Eight easily winning the fight with their colourful abilities. Subsequently, this became a popular motif in many forms of art. It also gave rise to the saying, Ba Xian Guo Hai Ge Xian Shen Tong (八仙过海各显神通). This means an engagement in which each player exhibits his or her unique talents.

Interesting to know:

  • Like Madam White Snake, the story of the Eight Immortals has been made into many TV dramas and movies.
  • The Eight Immortals also feature in martial arts. Jackie Chan’s early work, the Drunken Master, has the drunken fighting style based on the Eight Immortals. In the movie, the hardest stance for Jackie to master was that of He Xiangu. Because she is the only female in the group.
  • Several of the Eight are based on historical figures. Curiously, while they are all well-known and acknowledged as gods, only Lü Dong Bin has a significant number of worshippers today. His followers sometimes refer to him as Sage Lü. (吕主, lu zhu).

Sculpture of Ba Xian at Penglai, China. The Eight Immortals are said to reside at Penglai.
Sculpture of Ba Xian at Penglai, China. The Eight Immortals are said to reside at Penglai. | Source
Diorama of the Eight Immortals crossing the sea at Singapore's Haw Par Villa.
Diorama of the Eight Immortals crossing the sea at Singapore's Haw Par Villa. | Source

6. Yu and the Great Flood (大禹治水 da yu zhi shui)

The Chinese myth of Yu and the Great Flood is an allegory for several virtues.
The Chinese myth of Yu and the Great Flood is an allegory for several virtues. | Source

During the rule of Emperor Yao in ancient China, a terrible flood persisted, leading to the death of many and the destruction of most crops. While Yao appointed many to manage the flood, none succeeded. The situation worsened by the day.

Eventually, Yao turned to a young man named Yu (禹). Versions differ as to how Yu attended to the task, but he succeeded where so many had failed. To reward him for his efforts, Yao appointed Yu as his successor. Yu subsequently became the first ruler of the Xia Dynasty (夏朝). Once believed to be purely mythical, some archaeologists and historians nowadays believe that the Xia Dynasty, and Yu, might have indeed existed.

Interesting to know:

  • Various Chinese myths claimed Yu subdued demons and monsters to control the flood. Others had him drilling through a mountain. One version even had him mobilising a large force to move a mountain rock by rock, with him physically involved in the effort.
  • Some modern geologists believe the story of Yu and the flood to be true. They base their hypotheses on sediments found in the Yellow River.
  • Whatever the truth, the story of Yu and his efforts to contain the flood is nowadays a Chinese allegory for perseverance. It is also an allegory for innovation.

7. The Lotus Lantern (宝莲灯 bao lian deng)

The Chinese myth of the Lotus Lantern bears many similarities to the Legend of the White Snake. Likewise, it was also made into several movies, TV dramas, and stage operas.

The story is based on the folklore of Chen Xiang (沉香). Chen was the son of Liu Yanchang (刘彦昌), a mortal man, and San Sheng Mu (三圣母), a divine goddess of Mount Hua. Chen’s maternal uncle, Er Lang Shen (二郎神), disapproved of this union, and he punished his sister by imprisoning her under the lotus peak of Mount Hua. Years later, Chen Xiang used his mother’s magical lotus lantern to defeat his uncle. After doing so, he split Mount Hua and freed his mum.

This trope of forbidden marriages is beloved by the Chinese. Another famous Chinese myth is that of the Cowherd and the Weaver Girl (牛郎织女 niu lang zhi nü). This pair was punished by being permitted to meet only once a year, on the seventh day of the seventh month, on a bridge formed by magpies. The tragic romance suffusing these stories naturally led to their mass popularity. The trope of the “son” saving the mother could also be considered as an endorsement of filial piety in Chinese myths.

Interesting to know:

  • Er Lang Shen is an actual Taoist God. In Investiture of the Gods, he was one of the most powerful protagonists. In Journey to the West, he battled Sun Wukong to a standstill. His most defining feature is a third eye in the middle of his forehead. He also owns a heavenly hound (哮天犬 xiao tian quan). Naturally, Sun Wukong detests him and his mutt.
  • Mount Hua is the “Western Peak” (西岳 xi yue) of the Five Holy Mountains of China. It is notorious for its steep and dangerous ascent.

The majestic Mount Hua. Prominent not only in Chinese myths, but also Wuxia stories.
The majestic Mount Hua. Prominent not only in Chinese myths, but also Wuxia stories. | Source

8. Pan Gu Creates the World (盘古开天 pan gu kai tian)

Pan Gu separating heaven and earth with his axe.
Pan Gu separating heaven and earth with his axe. | Source

In Chinese myths, Pan Gu (盘古) was the first living being in the whole of creation. He is usually envisioned as being looking somewhat savage, and wearing a fur/grass woven shawl.

During his time, there was no sky and earth. Everything was just one primordial mess. From this chaos, a cosmic egg was formed, which in turn gave birth to Pan Gu. After coming into existence, Pan Gu progressively shaped the world that we know of today. With his mighty axe, he split the sky from the earth. He also ensured the sky stayed separated by continuously pushing it upwards.

After his feat of creating the world, and many, many years later, Pan Gu died. His breathe then became the wind and weather. His voice, thunder. His body also formed the world, or more specifically, the continent of China. The rest of him transformed into the living beings that populate the world today. Based on this myth, everything in the world, ourselves inclusive, originated from Pan Gu.

Interesting to know:

  • Pan Gu’s axe is occasionally featured as an end-game weapon in video games.

9. Nüwa Heals the Sky (女娲补天 nu wa bu tian)

Nuwa is usually referred to as Nuwa Niang Niang, "niang niang" being an honorific term meaning empress.
Nuwa is usually referred to as Nuwa Niang Niang, "niang niang" being an honorific term meaning empress. | Source

Nüwa (女娲) was an ancient Chinese goddess. Her most prominent story in Chinese myths is that of her repairing the heavenly pillars.

During her time, the battle between Gonggong (共工) and Zhuanxu (颛顼) damaged the various pillars holding up heaven. This resulted in the world being plagued by fire and flood. Answering the prayers of mortals, Nüwa smelted together magical five-coloured stones and repaired the pillars. Some versions also had her slaying all sorts of monsters to restore peace on Earth.

Interesting to know:

Some versions also claim Nüwa to be the first woman on Earth.

  • Nüwa was an important character in Investiture of the Gods. In that story, she was the one who sent the nine-tailed vixen to the wicked Emperor Zhou. She did so to punish Emperor Zhou for lusting for her in her temple.
  • Other than Investiture of the Gods, Nüwa doesn't enjoy any other major appearances in Chinese myths.

10. The Three Sovereigns and The Five Emperors (三王五帝 san wang wu di)

Sculpture of Yellow Emperor and Emperor Yan in the ZhengZhou Yellow River Scenic Area.
Sculpture of Yellow Emperor and Emperor Yan in the ZhengZhou Yellow River Scenic Area. | Source

Chinese myths state the Three Sovereigns and the Five Emperors to be the mythological rulers of ancient China. While the actual composition varies, Fuxi (伏羲), Shengnong (神农), and the Yellow Emperor (黄帝 huang di) feature in most versions.

Fuxi, half man and half snake, is believed be the first man. He was also the brother/husband of Nüwa. Fuxi is credited with the creation of many things, the most famous of which being the I-Ching. (易经 yi jing). It is said that he learnt of the hexagrams after examining the back of a mythical tortoise.

Shengnong translates to the “divine farmer,” and correspondingly has many farming practices credited to him. He is also renowned for testing hundreds of herbs in order to determine their medicinal values. So it is said, he ultimately died of poisoning from this repeated experimentation. His intestines were destroyed by the potent poison he had swallowed.

Lastly, the Yellow Emperor, or Huang Di, is recognised by the Chinese to be the first Emperor. (Mythological, not historically). His full name was Ji Xuanyuan (姬轩辕). Like the others, Huang Di is credited with the invention of many things. He is also credited with the defeat of Emperor Yan (炎帝 yan di) and the unification of Ancient China. In 2004, an academic conference concluded that Emperor Yan and Shennong were actually the same person. Whichever the case, Huang Di became the ruler of the Yan Huang tribe after his victory. Till today, the term, the sons of Yan Huang (炎黄子孙 yan huang zi sun) is used by the Chinese to refer to themselves.

Interesting to know:

  • Huang Di’s greatest invention was the South-Pointing Chariot (指南车 zhi nan che). After uniting China, his people were besieged by the Jiu Li (九黎) Clan. The leader of the Jiu Li, Chiyou (蚩尤), is said to have a bronze head and many arms, capable also of spewing a magical fog that trapped Huang Di’s troops. To traverse through the fog, Huang Di created the South-Pointing Chariot. This vehicle had a figure that always pointed to the South.
  • In modern day Chinese, the term “Zhi Nan” is synonymous with compass or guide.

Shou Qiu, in Shan Dong province, is believed to be the birthplace of Huang Di.
Shou Qiu, in Shan Dong province, is believed to be the birthplace of Huang Di. | Source
Model of a Zhi Nan Che, displayed at the science museum in London.
Model of a Zhi Nan Che, displayed at the science museum in London. | Source

The Myth of Huang Di Inspired Many Video Games

Special Mention: Liao Zhai (聊斋 liao zhai)

Liao Zhai is a collection of supernatural tales written by Pu Songlin (蒲松龄) in the 18th century. Macabre, colourful, and often terrifying, Pu Songlin's stories were a critique of the injustice he witnessed in society.

The most famous Liao Zhai story, thanks to Hong-Kong-made movies, is Qian Nü You Hun (倩女幽魂). This is the mother of all Chinese myths/stories involving a bedraggled scholar and a kindly female spirit. In 1987, the late Hong Kong pop idol Leslie Cheung and Taiwanese beauty Joey Wong starred in the most famous screen adaptation. Here’s a visual summary, with the title song, to give you an idea of the story.

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    • Anne Harrison 2 months ago

      What a great hub. There is so much to learn from these tales, which add depth to any trip to China. In Japan, I visited a temple where Tripitaka is said to have brought these scrolls from India.

    • Cyong74 2 months ago

      Hi Anne. Thanks for your comment. I hope you get to visit China someday too, and experience these myths brought alive by architecture and arts.

    • CYong74 profile image
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      Cedric Yong 2 months ago from Singapore

      Thanks for commenting, Anne. I hope you get to visit China soon too, and see these myths come alive in architecture and art.

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