10 Great Celebrity Memoirs

Updated on November 28, 2018
Laura335 profile image

I am the author of three middle grade children's books, and I blog on the side. My favorite topics are movies, writing, and pop culture.

Celebrity biographical section of a book store.
Celebrity biographical section of a book store. | Source

Introduction

According to Goodreads, about one-third of the the books that I read in a year are a biography or memoir. Celebrities lead very interesting but also very human lives, and a memoir is a great format in which to tell stories about the business or their own personal struggles that they can share with the world. A famous name can get a reader to pick up the book, but a good writer can keep a reader from putting it down. Comedians are natural storytellers, but even serious actors have been known to produce a great memoir or two. Below is a list of 10 books by famous people that I recommend if you are a fan of celebrity memoirs or are looking for something interesting and inspiring to read.

Marc Summers' Everything In Its Place talks about his struggles with OCD from his childhood and up through his career.
Marc Summers' Everything In Its Place talks about his struggles with OCD from his childhood and up through his career. | Source

"Everything In Its Place" by Marc Summers (1999)

Summary

This is one of the few books on this list that is not very funny. It’s actually a self-help book for those who have or think they might have obsessive-compulsive disorder, written by a TV personality who kept his disease hidden from himself, and the world, for years. Best known as the host of Nickelodeon's game show, Double Dare, in the 80’s and 90’s, Summers uses his life as a backdrop to show how he handled his compulsions, diagnosis, and eventually conquered his condition. It even includes a piece written by his doctor, Eric Hollander, who adds a professional perspective to Marc’s own experiences. Summers’ writing is straightforward, simple, and upbeat, never lingering on the bad for very long. OCD overtook his life for many years, so it’s only fitting that OCD is the focus of his book. It's not preachy or loaded with medical jargon. It is just a man describing what it's like to be him, both good and bad, and a comfort to those who feel the same.

Favorite Part

Summers tells a story about his one and only pre-treatment reprieve of his OCD symptoms after a major earthquake strikes his home one night. For the first time, his focus shifted not from the mess that was left by the quake but by the safety and well-being of his family. It shows just how these compulsions can take over your thoughts and that it takes something as extreme as a natural disaster to distract from the rituals that are forced upon those with OCD.

One of director Kevin Smith's memoirs about his life and early career.
One of director Kevin Smith's memoirs about his life and early career. | Source

"My Boring-Ass Life: The Uncomfortably Candid Diary of Kevin Smith" by Kevin Smith (2007)

Summary

Filmmaker Kevin Smith records the day-to-day details of his life from March 2005 to November 2006. Nothing is left out, and I mean nothing. The book starts with entries chronicling everything from what fast food restaurant he ate in each night to how well he did in his ongoing online gambling games.Halfway through, the focus shifts as Smith chronicles filming his latest movie, Clerks 2, before heading off to Canada to star in the movie Catch and Release. Smith then dedicates a large chunk of the book to the history of best friend, Jason Mewes’ drug addiction and how he pulled himself from the brink of death to clean himself up and start fresh. The book ends with Smith meeting one of heroes, actor Bruce Willis, on the set of Live Free or Die Hard and his desire to work with him on a future project. Any fan of Smith’s knows how this interaction plays out after the events of the book, and it’s amusing to have the diary end on such an upbeat note, knowing the professional misery that is to follow.

Favorite Part

I read the 70 page, nine part story buried in the middle of the book titled, Me and My Shadow in one sitting. This is the section that tells the story of Jason Mewes’ drug addiction from Smith’s point of view and all that Smith did to save his friend’s life time and again before he ultimately discovered that only Mewes could save himself and stands by eagerly as he does.

However, I also have to reference this paragraph about how an anal fissure got him out of jury duty:

“Unable to even lean on the jury box without wincing, I ultimately laid down on the floor, hoping that taking the weight off my feet by being prone might lessen the pain. At this point, the judge puts a stop to the cross-examination and says, ‘Did we lose someone? Juror number three?’ I weakly respond ‘I’m down here, your honor.’ Nice guy that he was, the judge said ‘I understand you’re having some problems, but I really think it’s important you see the witness’ face as she testifies.’ I replied ‘I’m in such rectal agony right now, I couldn’t care less about seeing the witnesses face, your honor.’ When he asked what the court could do for me, I asked for a ten-minute break, which he quickly granted.”

Filmmaker Nora Ephron's greatest book of essays.
Filmmaker Nora Ephron's greatest book of essays. | Source

"I Feel Bad About My Neck: And Other Thoughts on Being A Woman" by Nora Ephron (2008)

Summary

This book of essays written by the famous writer/director offers a glimpse into her concerns about aging and reflections on her life. Ephron jumps from one topic to another, sharing glimpses into her life and the charming first world problems that irk her and entertain us. She was whip-smart and knew how to make rich people problems relatable to everyone. It's also interesting to hear about how her close but sometimes troubled family life shaped her into the person that she became.

Favorite Part

Her essay, “I Hate My Purse,” is one of the most relatable chapters to anyone who carries a bag around with them all day. Here is an excerpt below:

“This is for women whose purses are a morass of loose Tic Tacs, solitary Advils, lipsticks without tops, ChapSticks of unknown vintage, little bits of tobacco even though there has been no smoking going on for at least ten years, tampons that have come loose from their wrappings, English coins from a trip to London last October, boarding passes from long-forgotten airplane trips, hotel keys from God-knows-what hotel, leaky ballpoint pens, Kleenexes that either have or have not been used but there’s not way to be sure one way or another…”

Actor Gene Wilder's life story is told in the pages of "Kiss Me Like a Stranger."
Actor Gene Wilder's life story is told in the pages of "Kiss Me Like a Stranger." | Source

"Kiss Me Like A Stranger: My Search for Love and Art" by Gene Wilder (2010)

Summary

Actor Gene Wilder tells his life story, chronicling his childhood, career, and marriages. Wilder was a very different person from the larger-than-life characters that he played, and the quiet, sensitive person that he actually was is reflected in his writing. He makes other people the star of his stories, yet he lingers on his own thoughts and feelings that he had during each experience, from perfecting his craft onstage and onscreen to facing cancer diagnosed in both loved ones and himself. This book may include the last lucid thoughts of Wilder before he succumbed to the Alzheimer’s Disease that eventually took his life in 2016.

Favorite Part

His stories about filming Young Frankenstein are particularly entertaining thanks to the colorful recollections of his interactions with director Mel Brooks:

“In all the time we spent together, we had only one argument. I can’t even remember what it was about; I just remember that he yelled at me. Ten minutes after he left, he called me on the phone from his house: “WHO WAS THAT MADMAN YOU HAD IN YOUR HOUSE? I COULD HEAR THE YELLING ALL THE WAY OVER HERE. YOU SHOULD NEVER LET CRAZY PEOPLE INTO YOUR HOUSE-DON’T YOU KNOW THAT? THEY COULD BE DANGEROUS.’”

"Bossypants" highlights Tina Fey's comedic timing and shows you how she got to where she is today.
"Bossypants" highlights Tina Fey's comedic timing and shows you how she got to where she is today. | Source

"Bossypants" by Tina Fey (2011)

Summary

Comedy actor/writer Tina Fey tells her life story in a series of essays on topics ranging from describing her stern father to working on her show, 30 Rock. Fey also offers tips about posing for photo shoots, answering hate mail, and how to be a female boss in a male-dominated workplace, experiences that most of us will never encounter but still want to hear about. The pacing of each story is unsurprisingly well-timed. Hysterical side thoughts come from out of nowhere and nearly knock you over into a fit of hysterics. I’ve read this book both as an audio book and paperback, and both times, her strong voice came through and became the voice in your head regaling these funny anecdotes.

Favorite Part

Fey tells the story about a terrible experience while on her honeymoon cruise when a part of the ship caught fire and the passengers were forced to temporarily abandon ship before having to dock in Bermuda and fly back home. Her narration makes this nightmare of a trip into a hysterical cautionary tale riddled with tips and jokes at one point saying:

“If you ever have to get on a lifeboat, the person in charge of your safety will likely be a nineteen-year-old dancer from Tampa who just had a fight with his boyfriend about the new Rhianna video.”

Mindy Kaling uses self-consciousness to a hysterical advantage in both the text and title of her book: "Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me..."
Mindy Kaling uses self-consciousness to a hysterical advantage in both the text and title of her book: "Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me..." | Source

"Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me (And Other Concerns)" by Mindy Kaling (2011)

Summary

Actress Mindy Kaling tells her life story in a series of essays on a variety of funny topics. She gently pokes fun at how people perceive her through her weight, race, and gender and even mocks her view of herself through these prisms. She helps to give feminism a good name by showing how it’s possible to talk about women’s issues without sounding whiny or sensitive. She also still remembers what life is like on the other side of fame and shows us how her lifestyle has changed but her confusion about it has not.

Kaling’s sentences are long, sharp, and detailed, much like the way she speaks. Like many of the books on this list, hers also contains photographs of herself which she utilizes as a punch line for many jokes throughout the book. She’s like a character in a movie who is thrown into a glamorous life and is still trying to figure out how to maneuver through it, and it's fun to go along for the ride.

Favorite Part

The best thing about this book is Kaling’s one-liners that come out of nowhere and leave just as fast including:

“Sometimes you just have to put on lip gloss and pretend to be psyched.”

“What I’ve noticed is that almost no one who was a big star in high school is also big star later in life. For us overlooked kids, it’s so wonderfully fair.”

“Nothing gives you confidence like being a member of a small, weirdly specific, hard-to-find demographic.”

Billy Crystal tells stories about the past and present from the perspective of a grumpy old man in this memoir.
Billy Crystal tells stories about the past and present from the perspective of a grumpy old man in this memoir. | Source

"Still Foolin’ ‘Em: Where I’ve Been, Where I’m Going, and Where The Hell Are My Keys?" by Billy Crystal (2013)

Summary

In this book, comedian Billy Crystal’s essays chronicle what it’s like to get older as he looks back on his life, career, and relationships, including those with admired sports figures such as Mickey Mantle and Muhammad Ali. His humor ranges from cranky old man to Mike Wazowski-sized enthusiasm. Previous books have touched on his life, but this one really gives you the stories you want to hear, flip flopping between eras from childhood to his big name movies to making preparations for his eventual demise. Despite some heavy topics, the humor never wavers. Crystal still has a lot of jokes left in him and a lot of experiences ahead of him. This is a comfort to anyone who is aging or who thinks they haven’t accomplished enough in their life so far.

Favorite Part

The book really grabbed me with this first sentence in his chapter, “Why Worry”:

“One thing is constant for me. Every night I go to sleep at eleven. I wake up refreshed, ready to go, full of energy, look at the clock, and it’s one-ten A.M.”

"I Must Say" is a book that I can't put down every time I read it.
"I Must Say" is a book that I can't put down every time I read it. | Source

"I Must Say: My Life As A Humble Comedy Legend" by Martin Short (2014)

Summary

Comedian Martin Short tells his life’s story from birth to present, highlighting both professional and personal ups and downs including the death of his older brother and parents in the first two decades of his life, his stint on Saturday Night Live, his film career, and the illness and death of his wife. His tragedies are heartbreaking, but you can really tell that Short takes life as it is and adopts a positive, upbeat attitude, never letting tragedy break him or spiral him into self-destructive behavior. He plunges ahead, building a respectable career and a loving family. The text is hilarious, but the audio book read by Short himself will have you on the floor as he assumes the voices of each of his famous characters as they are referenced throughout the book.

Favorite Part

I love his story about meeting Frank Sinatra and of inadvertently irritating him with his nervous, star struck demeanor. I won’t spoil it here, but anyone who has embarrassed themselves in the presence of an intimidating elder will be able to relate to this tale.

Here is a clip of him telling the story to Jimmy Fallon on The Tonight Show:

Martin Short's Frank Sinatra story.

Amy Poehler's "Yes Please" is her own version of "Bossypants," and she makes it her own in terms of humor, tone, and the stories she tells.
Amy Poehler's "Yes Please" is her own version of "Bossypants," and she makes it her own in terms of humor, tone, and the stories she tells. | Source

"Yes Please" by Amy Poehler (2015)

Summary

Comedian Amy Poehler tries her hand at a self-help book by telling her life story that includes tales from childhood on, working in life lessons to share with her readers with more than a few jokes thrown into the mix. She skips over more personal, heartbreaking stories such as the end of her marriage, choosing instead to offer more general advice to women, comedians, and people in general. She pokes fun at the fact that she has no professional advice, unique perspectives, or the triumph of overcoming a major hardship to offer and reiterates several times that writing the book was extremely difficult, culminating in a pieced together series of stories, essays, and advice that flow really well and never gets too heavy or preachy. You come for the humor but stay for the insight.

Favorite Part

Poehler’s meltdown over the death of her obstetrician just before she is about to give birth and then watching Saturday Night Live in her hospital bed after she has delivered her first baby is one of the best birth stories I’ve ever read.

The decision to put a picture of young Mara Wilson on the front of the book and grown Mara Wilson on the back of the book was a genius move by the publishers of "Where Am I Now?"
The decision to put a picture of young Mara Wilson on the front of the book and grown Mara Wilson on the back of the book was a genius move by the publishers of "Where Am I Now?" | Source

"Where Am I Now?: True Stories of Girlhood and Accidental Fame" By Mara Wilson (2016)

Summary

Child actress Mara Wilson updates her fans on what she has been up to since her last movie role. We find that Wilson is actually a talented writer who uses her skills to bounce from topic to topic to talk about what she remembers about her acting career, her mother’s death, finding her clique in school, and discovering her knack for writing. By the end, you see that Wilson is still trying to figure things out, but is also comfortable with where she is in life. Still, it’s hard not to see her as the child actress role that first introduced us to her, but it’s a relief to see her happy, healthy, and with a witty sense of humor, an accomplishment that many child actors never attain.

Favorite Part

It was so gratifying to hear about how the book Matilda was such a beloved story in Wilson's house growing up and how her mother used to take the book to schools to read to kids in her free time. So, when she gets the part in the film adaptation, it explains how she was able to play the part so perfectly.


What are your favorite memoirs? Leave your answers in the comments below!

Questions & Answers

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      • MsDora profile image

        Dora Weithers 

        23 months ago from The Caribbean

        Very interesting, Laura. You make me want to read them all, but the first would be Mara Wilson's. Thanks for compiling this interesting list.

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