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1929 Fun Facts and Trivia

Gregory DeVictor is a trivia enthusiast who loves to write articles on American nostalgia.

This article teaches you fun facts, trivia, and historical events from the year 1929.

This article teaches you fun facts, trivia, and historical events from the year 1929.

Why Was the Year 1929 so Special?

What are some fun facts, trivia, and historical events from the year 1929? What were the top news stories in the U.S. and around the world? What happened in the business and financial sectors, in science, technology, sports, the entertainment industry, and in everyday life? What about famous birthdays, marriages, and deaths that year?

  1. On October 29, “Black Tuesday hit Wall Street as investors traded some 16 million shares on the New York Stock Exchange in a single day. Billions of dollars were lost, wiping out thousands of investors. In the aftermath of Black Tuesday, America and the rest of the industrialized world spiraled downward into the Great Depression (August 1929 to March 1939), the deepest and longest-lasting economic downturn in the history of the Western industrialized world up to that time.” (On the surface at least, World War II seems to mark the end of the Great Depression.)
  2. The United States and Canada agreed to work together to protect the world-famous Niagara Falls from erosion and to generate more hydroelectric power.
  3. A catastrophic fire in the main building of the Cleveland Clinic claimed the lives of 123 people and injured 92 others. OhioHistoryCentral reports that “The fire began when an exposed light bulb was too close to some nitro-cellulose x-ray film, igniting the film. Most of the victims died from inhaling poisonous gases produced by the burning x-ray film.”
  4. With a mission to train guide dogs to help the blind, Dorothy Harrison Eustis and Morris Frank founded The Seeing Eye, a guide dog school that is currently located in Morristown, New Jersey.
  5. General Motors acquired 80% of the German auto manufacturer Adam Opel for just under $26 million.
  6. President Hoover signed legislation that authorized the building of the Hoover Dam in Nevada.
  7. The first “employer-sponsored hospitalization plan” was created by teachers in Dallas, Texas.
  8. The first airport hotel—the Oakland Airport Inn—opened in Oakland, California.
  9. The first annual Bud Billiken Parade and Picnic, the oldest African-American parade in the U.S., was held in Chicago.
  10. In 1929, E. A. Murphy invented foam rubber, Edwin S. Lowe created the game of bingo, and Sam Foster invented and mass-produced the first sunglasses. Likewise, Clarence Birdseye developed frozen foods, and Charles Midgley Jr. and Charles Kettering co-invented freon, a non-combustible gas that is used in air conditioning and refrigeration. Finally, Dr. Earle Haas created the modern tampon, William E. McDonell and Charles W. Stickel co-invented the eyelash curler, and Paul Galvin pioneered the car radio.
  11. After opening a store in Milford, Delaware, J. C. Penney had locations in all 48 states. (Remember, Alaska and Hawaii did not become U.S. states until 1959.)
  12. In New York City, the original Waldorf-Astoria Hotel closed and was soon demolished—to make way for the construction of the Empire State Building.
  13. Over 800,000 refrigerators were sold in the U.S.
  14. In 1929, milk was 35 cents a gallon, bread cost 10 cents for a 16-ounce loaf, and watermelons were 50 cents apiece. Maxwell House coffee was 49 cents for a 16-ounce tin, three heads of iceberg lettuce were 25 cents, and sugar cost eight cents a pound. A movie ticket went for 35 cents, a daily newspaper cost two cents, and a man’s Stetson hat was $8.50-$10.00.
  15. At the first Academy Awards ceremony—which honored the best films of 1927 and 1928—Wings won an Oscar for Best Picture, Emil Jannings (The Last Command) won an Oscar for Best Actor, and Janet Gaynor (7th Heaven) won an Oscar for Best Actress.
  16. On with the Show!, a musical film released by Warner Bros., became “the first all-talking, all-color feature-length film.”
  17. Walter Winchell—a columnist with the New York Daily Mirror who liked to combine political commentary with celebrity gossip—debuted as a radio news commentator.
  18. Tarzan, one of the first adventure comic strips, appeared in newspapers for the first time.
  19. Popeye made his first public appearance “in Elzie Segar's then nine-year-old comic strip, Thimble Theatre, which originally revolved around Olive Oyl's family.”
  20. The Green Bay Packers were the NFL champs, the Philadelphia Athletics won the World Series, and the Boston Bruins clinched the Stanley Cup.
  21. Babe Ruth became the first professional baseball player to hit 500 home runs.
  22. The New York Yankees became the first MLB team to feature numbers on the backs of uniforms.
  23. Consumer products introduced in 1929 include 7 Up, Cordura fabric, the Crunchies chocolate bar, Flavor Aid, Magic Chef appliances, Pine-Sol household cleaner, Slim Jims, and Twizzlers.
  24. Martin Luther King Jr., Audrey Hepburn, Grace Kelly, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Christopher Plummer, Arnold Palmer, Dick Clark, Barbara Walters, Berry Gordy Jr., and Ed Asner were all born.
  25. At the 5th National Spelling Bee, 12-year-old Virginia Hogan of Omaha, Nebraska correctly spelled the word “luxuriance.”

This article teaches you fun facts, trivia, and historical events from the year 1929. Find out about popular movies, music, books, foods, sports facts, famous birthdays, and other cool pop culture trends to get the right mix of questions and answers for your 1920s-themed trivia game.

In 1929, Borden was one of America’s biggest companies, and the largest producer of dairy products in the United States.

In 1929, Borden was one of America’s biggest companies, and the largest producer of dairy products in the United States.

Table of Contents

  1. Grocery Prices in the Year 1929
  2. History Facts From the USA and World
  3. Sports Trivia
  4. Miscellaneous Fun Facts, Trivia, and Pop Culture Trends
  5. 1920's Slang Words and Phrases
  6. Nobel Prize Winners
  7. Best-Selling Novels
  8. 1929 in American Radio
  9. Greatest Films of 1929
  10. Ten Best Horror Movies of the Year
  11. Biggest Pop Music Artists and Groups
  12. Top 40 Songs for the Year
  13. Food and Beverage Trivia
  14. 101 Popular Prohibition-Era Sandwiches
  15. Famous Birthdays
  16. Notable Weddings
  17. Famous People Who Died
  18. Largest American Companies
  19. U.S. Automobile Production Figures for the Year
  20. American Companies and Brands Established During 1929
In 1929, the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company, better known as the A&P, was one of America’s leading grocery store chains.

In 1929, the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company, better known as the A&P, was one of America’s leading grocery store chains.

1. Grocery Prices in the Year 1929

These grocery facts have been made available courtesy of the Morris County Library in Whippany, New Jersey.

  1. Apples: Three pounds for 22 cents
  2. Bacon (Fireside, sliced): 45 cents a pound
  3. Bananas: 12 for 25 cents
  4. Bread (Supreme): A 16-ounce loaf for eight cents
  5. Butter (Louella): 53 cents a pound
  6. Cantaloupes: Two for 19 cents
  7. Celery: 15 cents a stalk
  8. Cheese: 20 cents per half pound
  9. Coffee (Maxwell House): 49 cents for a 16-ounce tin
  10. Coffee (Sanka, decaffeinated): 65 cents for a 16-ounce jar
  11. Cranberries: 10 cents a pint
  12. Crisco: 23 cents for a one-pound can
  13. Flour: Five cents a pound
  14. Grapefruit: Two for 25 cents
  15. Grapes: 10 cents a pound
  16. Ham (Armour Star): 49 cents a pound
  17. Jam (Ideal, strawberry): 29 cents for a 16-ounce jar
  18. Jell-O: Three packages for 20 cents
  19. Ketchup (Pride of the Farm): 18 cents for a 16-ounce bottle
  20. Lamb chops: 39 cents a pound
  21. Lard (Wilson’s): 39 cents for a two-pound can
  22. Milk: 14 cents a quart
  23. Mincemeat: 40 cents a pound
  24. Oats (Quaker, regular or quick cook): 10 cents a box
  25. Onions: Five pounds for 25 cents
  26. Oranges (Sunkist): One dozen for 25 cents
  27. Pancake flour (Aunt Jemima): 14 cents a package
  28. Potatoes: 50-85 cents a bushel
  29. Rolls: 18 cents per dozen
  30. Soda (C & C, ginger ale): Three bottles for 25 cents
  31. Soup (Campbell’s): Three cans for 25 cents
  32. Spaghetti (Asco): Three packages for 25 cents
  33. Sugar: Eight cents a pound
  34. Turkey: 49 cents a pound
  35. Watermelon: 50 cents apiece
In 1929, mixed nuts were a popular snack food. One year earlier, Planters cocktail peanuts were introduced in an eight-ounce, vacuum-sealed can, which later became the company's signature can.

In 1929, mixed nuts were a popular snack food. One year earlier, Planters cocktail peanuts were introduced in an eight-ounce, vacuum-sealed can, which later became the company's signature can.

2. History Facts From the USA and World

Back in 1929, there were no smartphones, smartwatches, or televisions. There were no personal computers, DVDs, or flash drives. Google, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube weren’t around yet. However, there were coloring books, marbles, and ping-pong. There were baseball cards, jigsaw puzzles, and roller skating. There were card games, singing games, and seesaws. Likewise, there were dance halls, amusement parks, and something called reading.

In 1929, listening to the radio was probably the most popular form of entertainment, and about 40 percent of American households owned a radio by the end of the decade. With the addition of sound and color, movies also became an increasingly popular form of diversion. Comedies, gangster movies, horror films, westerns, melodramas, and musicals all helped people to forget their troubles.

  1. January 2: The United States and Canada agreed to work together to protect the world-famous Niagara Falls from erosion, and to generate more hydroelectric power. Canadian Prime Minister William Mackenzie King and the American Minister to Canada, William Phillips, signed an agreement to authorize $2 million (about $27 million today) in construction work on the Niagara River.
  2. In 1929, William Paley changed the name of the United Independent Broadcasters (UIB) to the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS).
  3. January 29: With the mission to train guide dogs to help the blind, Dorothy Harrison Eustis and Morris Frank founded The Seeing Eye, a guide dog school that is currently located in Morristown, New Jersey.
  4. February 14: During the St. Valentine’s Massacre, seven gangsters—all rivals of Al Capone—were murdered in Chicago.
  5. February 20: The Boston Red Sox announced that because Fenway Park was located too close to a church, they would play Sunday MLB games at Braves Field instead.
  6. February 26: Congress established the Grand Teton National Park in northwestern Wyoming. With approximately 310,000 acres, “the park includes the major peaks of the 40-mile-long (64 km) Teton Range as well as most of the northern sections of the valley known as Jackson Hole.”
  7. March 2: The San Francisco Bay Toll-Bridge—the longest bridge in California and the 25th longest in the world by length—opened to traffic.
  8. March 4: Herbert Hoover (R-California) was sworn in as the 31st president of the United States, and Charles Curtis (R-Kansas) was sworn in as the 31st U.S. vice president.
  9. March 4: James Eli Watson (R-Indiana) became the Senate majority leader, and filled the seat vacated by Charles Curtis (R-Kansas), who became the vice-president.
  10. March 4: Nicholas Longworth (R-Ohio) was the speaker of the House of Representatives.
  11. March 4: the 71st Congress “met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1929, to March 4, 1931, during the first two years of Herbert Hoover's presidency.”
  12. March 4: William Howard Taft (Ohio) was the Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court.
  13. March 17: General Motors acquired 80% of the German auto manufacturer Adam Opel for just under $26 million.
  14. March 23: President Herbert Hoover had a telephone installed at his desk.
  15. April 15: Canadian Johnny Miles won the 33rd Boston Marathon for the second time.
  16. April 16: The New York Yankees became the first MLB team to feature numbers on the backs of uniforms.
  17. May 13: The National Crime Syndicate was founded by Lucky Luciano in Atlantic City, New Jersey.
  18. May 15: A devastating fire partially destroyed the main building of the renowned Cleveland Clinic. Ohio History Central reports that “The fire began when an exposed light bulb was too close to some nitro-cellulose x-ray film, igniting the film. In the end, 123 people lost their lives. Eighty of the dead were either patients or visitors at the clinic, and the rest were employees. One of the Cleveland Clinic's founders, Dr. John Phillips, was among the dead. Most of the victims died from inhaling poisonous gases produced by the burning x-ray film.”
  19. May 16: At the first Academy Awards ceremony—which honored the best films of 1927 and 1928—Wings won an Oscar for Best Picture, Emil Jannings (The Last Command) won an Oscar for Best Actor, and Janet Gaynor (7th Heaven) won an Oscar for Best Actress. Lewis Milestone (Two Arabian Knights) won an Oscar for Best Director of a Comedy Picture, and Frank Borzage (7th Heaven) won an Oscar for Best Director of a Dramatic Picture.
  20. May 19: At the beginning of the sixth inning, a cloudburst caused a stampede at Yankee Stadium. SWNewsMedia.com reports that “Thousands of fans rushed for shelter under the grandstand in a panic, crushing a 60-year-old man and a 17-year-old girl to death during their flight. Sixty-two people were injured —18 of whom required overnight hospital care.”
  21. May 20: The Wickersham Commission began its investigation of alcohol prohibition in the United States.
  22. May 24: The Detroit Tigers beat the Chicago White Sox, 6-5, in 21 innings.
  23. May 30: Ray Keech won the Indianapolis 500.
  24. May 31: The Atlantic City Convention Center opened.
  25. June 16: Sixty-two-year-old Otto Funk ended his marathon walk from New York City to San Francisco. Funk covered 4,165 miles in 183 days.
  26. June 25: President Hoover signed legislation that authorized the building of the Hoover Dam in Nevada.
  27. June 27: In television history, “The first public demonstration of color TV was held by H. E. Ives and his colleagues at Bell Telephone Laboratories in New York. The first images were a bouquet of roses and an American flag. A mechanical system was used to transmit 50-line color television images between New York and Washington.”
  28. July 3: British scientist E. A. Murphy, who worked at the Dunlop Latex Development Laboratories in Birmingham, invented foam rubber. SciencElens.co.nz points out that “Murphy’s colleagues were initially unimpressed, but this soon changed when they caught on to the amazing cushioning and shape-retaining properties of this new invention, and it wasn’t long before foam rubber was used in motorcycle and car seats, mattresses, and much more.”
  29. July 15: The first airport hotel—the Oakland Airport Inn—opened in Oakland, California. According to AirSpaceMag.com “It boasted 37 rooms, a restaurant, barbershop, and airline ticket office. The lovely building faced the flying field.” (Famous American aviator Amelia Earhart even slept there.)
  30. July 28: Maurice De Waele of Belgium won the 23rd Tour de France.
  31. August 4: World-famous Jones Beach—the home to 6.5 miles of white sand on the south shore of Long Island—opened to visitors.
  32. August 11: Babe Ruth became the first professional baseball player to hit 500 home runs.
  33. August 11: The first Bud Billiken Parade and Picnic, the oldest and largest African-American parade in the U.S., was held in Chicago.
  34. August 23: Aviator Anne Morrow Lindbergh made her first solo flight. MNHS.org reports that Lindbergh "went on to be the first woman and the tenth American to earn a first-class glider pilot’s license in addition to her private pilot’s license.”
  35. September 3: The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) peaked at 381.17, a milestone that it would not reach again until November 1954.
  36. October 11: After opening store #1252 in Milford, Delaware, J. C. Penney had department stores in all 48 states. (Remember, Alaska and Hawaii did not become U.S. states until 1959.)
  37. October 14: The Philadelphia Athletics defeated the Chicago Cubs, four games to one, to win their fourth World Series.
  38. October 14: The Philadelphia A's set a World Series record with a 10-run inning.
  39. October 24: On Black Thursday, the beginning of the stock market crash, the DJIA was down 12.8%.
  40. October 25: Former Interior Secretary Albert B. Fall was convicted of bribery for his role in the Teapot Dome scandal, becoming the first presidential cabinet member to go to prison for wrongful actions in office.
  41. October 28: On Black Monday, the DJIA plummeted 38.33 points (13%) to 260.64.
  42. On October 29: According to History.com, “Black Tuesday hit Wall Street as investors traded some 16 million shares on the New York Stock Exchange in a single day. Billions of dollars were lost, wiping out thousands of investors. In the aftermath of Black Tuesday, America and the rest of the industrialized world spiraled downward into the Great Depression (1929-39), the deepest and longest-lasting economic downturn in the history of the Western industrialized world up to that time.”
  43. November 1929 and thereafter: History.com reports that “The average American family lived by the Depression-era motto: ‘Use it up, wear it out, make do or do without.’ Many tried to keep up appearances and carry on with life as close to normal as possible while they adapted to new economic circumstances. Households embraced a new level of frugality in daily life.”
  44. November 1929: How did President Hoover respond to the problems and challenges created by the Great Depression? Hoover.Archives.org tells us that “After the stock market crash, President Hoover sought to prevent panic from spreading throughout the economy. In November, he summoned business leaders to the White House and secured promises from them to maintain wages. According to Hoover’s economic theory, financial losses should affect profits, not employment, thus maintaining consumer spending and shortening the downturn. Hoover received commitments from private industry to spend $1.8 billion for new construction and repairs to be started in 1930, to stimulate employment.”
  45. November 7: The Museum of Modern Art opened in New York City.
  46. November 15: The Ambassador Bridge, which connects Detroit, Michigan to Windsor, Ontario, opened to traffic.
  47. November 28: According to Anarctic-Logistics.com, Admiral Richard E. Byrd, “along with pilot Bernt Balchen, co-pilot/radioman Harold June, and photographer Ashley McKinley, made their historic first-flight over the South Pole, in 18 hours, 41 minutes. Several other exploratory flights were later made.”
  48. December 20: Heinie Wagner replaced Bill Carrigan as the Boston Red Sox manager.
  49. December 21: The first “employer-sponsored hospitalization plan was created by teachers in Dallas, Texas.” Because the plan only covered members' expenses at a single hospital, it is also thought to be “the forerunner of today's health maintenance organizations (HMOs).”
In 1929, the Boston Bruins were the Stanley Cup champs.

In 1929, the Boston Bruins were the Stanley Cup champs.

3. Sports Trivia

Generally suitable for all age groups, sports questions are a welcome addition to any trivia night quiz.

  1. Kentucky Derby: Clyde Van Dusen
  2. NCAA Football Champs: Notre Dame
  3. NFL Champions: Green Bay Packers
  4. Rose Bowl: Georgia Tech over California
  5. Stanley Cup Champs: Boston Bruins
  6. U.S. Open Golf: Bobby Jones
  7. U.S. Open Tennis (men/women): William T. Tilden/Helen Wills
  8. Wimbledon (men/women): Henri Cochet/Helen Wills
  9. World Series Champions: Philadelphia Athletics
What kinds of foods did people eat during the Great Depression? LivingHistoryFarm.org tells us that “Chili, macaroni and cheese, soups, and creamed chicken on biscuits were popular meals.”

What kinds of foods did people eat during the Great Depression? LivingHistoryFarm.org tells us that “Chili, macaroni and cheese, soups, and creamed chicken on biscuits were popular meals.”

4. Miscellaneous Fun Facts, Trivia, and Pop Culture Trends

  1. In 1929, popular baby names were Robert, James, John, William, Mary, Betty, Dorothy, and Helen.
  2. The average life expectancy at birth in the U.S. was 55.8 years.
  3. Fashion icons for the year included Josephine Baker, Clara Bow, Louise Brooks, Joan Crawford, Marion Davies, Mary Eaton, Greta Garbo, Jean Harlow, Dolores Del Rio, and Thelma Todd.
  4. Time magazine’s “Person of the Year” was American industrialist Owen D. Young,
  5. Consumer products introduced in 1929 include 7 Up, Magic Chef appliances, Pine-Sol household cleaner, Slim Jims (snack food), and Twizzlers (candy).
  6. In 1929, over 800,000 refrigerators were sold in the U.S.
  7. In New York City, the original Waldorf-Astoria Hotel was closed and soon demolished—to make way for the construction of the Empire State Building.
  8. The famous Paris restaurant, La Tour d'Argent, served its 100,000th signature dish.
  9. The first Academy Awards were held during a banquet at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel.
  10. Prohibition ended in Nova Scotia, Canada, and was replaced by government-controlled liquor sales.
  11. During the 1920s, U.S. agricultural exports were about $1.94 billion a year, or 42% of total exports.
  12. Sheffield Farms of New York began to use “wax paper cartons instead of glass bottles for milk delivery.”
  13. The National Farm and Home Hour premiered on NBC radio.
  14. The ruby red grapefruit was created.
  15. The Mediterranean fruit fly was discovered in Florida.
  16. January 7: Tarzan—one of the first adventure comic strips—appeared in newspapers for the first time.
  17. January 8: CBS purchased the New York City radio station WABC from the Atlantic Broadcasting Company.
  18. January 17: Popeye made his first public appearance “in Elzie Segar's then nine-year-old comic strip, Thimble Theatre, which originally revolved around Olive Oyl's family.”
  19. January 18: Walter Winchell—a columnist with the New York Daily Mirror who liked to combine political commentary with celebrity gossip—debuted as a radio news commentator.
  20. February 5: Jimmy Hatlo's comic strip, They'll Do It Every Time, premiered in the San Francisco Call-Bulletin. (The comic strip ran until February 3, 2008, and its title became a popular catchphrase throughout America.)
  21. February 11: Eugene O'Neill's play Dynamo premiered in New York. The New York Times tells us that Dynamo “is an ambitious attempt to come to terms with what O'Neill described as ‘the sickness of today,’ the ‘death of an old god,’ the religion of his ancestors, and the failure of the new god of science and materialism, as represented by the dynamo.”
  22. April 1: Toymaker Louis Marx introduced his version of the yo-yo, a toy “consisting of an axle connected to two disks, and a string looped around the axle, similar to a spool.”
  23. April 1: Luis Buñuel released Un Chien Andalou (An Andalusian Dog)—a 24-minute surrealist film.
  24. May 16: At the first Academy Awards ceremony—which honored the best films of 1927 and 1928—Wings won an Oscar for Best Picture, Emil Jannings (The Last Command) won an Oscar for Best Actor, and Janet Gaynor (7th Heaven) won an Oscar for Best Actress. Lewis Milestone (Two Arabian Knights) won an Oscar for Best Director of a Comedy Picture, and Frank Borzage (7th Heaven) won an Oscar for Best Director of a Dramatic Picture.
  25. May 28: On with the Show!, a musical film released by Warner Bros., was “the first all-talking, all-color feature length film.”
  26. June 27: In television history, “The first public demonstration of color TV was held by H. E. Ives and his colleagues at Bell Telephone Laboratories in New York. The first images were a bouquet of roses and an American flag. A mechanical system was used to transmit 50-line color television images between New York and Washington.”
  27. August 19: Amos 'n Andy, a sitcom set in Harlem—the historic center of black culture in New York City—debuted on the NBC Blue radio network. FamilySearch.org tells us that Amos ‘n Andy “was based around the taxicab business of Amos Jones, his friend Andrew Hogg Brown, and George ‘Kingfish’ Stevens. It lasted more than 30 years.”
  28. November 7: The Museum of Modern Art opened in New York City.
  29. December 1: Edwin S. Lowe invented the game of bingo.
  30. December 30: Cole Porter's musical, Wake Up and Dream, premiered on Broadway.
  31. A 1929 Chevrolet Roadster: $525.00
  32. A 1929 Chrysler DeSoto Six: $845.00
  33. A 1929 Pontiac Big Six: $745.00
  34. A pair of boy’s pajamas: $1.50
  35. A boy’s sailor suit: $4.98
  36. A boy’s shirt: $1.00
  37. A girl’s dress: $5.59
  38. A man’s Stetson hat: $8.50-$10.00
  39. A man’s shirt: $1.50
  40. A woman’s dress: $16.50
  41. A woman’s turban style hat: $5.00
  42. A daily newspaper: Two cents
  43. A permanent wave: $8.00
  44. Dry cleaning (a man’s suit): $1.25
  45. Scott toilet tissue: 10 cents per roll
  46. Ivory soap: 25 cents for six “guest size” bars
  47. Asco ammonia: 19 cents for a quart bottle
  48. Brillo scouring pads: 17 cents for a large package
  49. A measuring spoon set: 25 cents
  50. A 10-quart pressure cooker: $20.00
  51. Mason jars: 85 cents for the pint size and $1.15 for the quart size
  52. Brooms: 55 cents apiece
  53. A gas range: $49.50-$67.50 each
  54. A refrigerator: $32.50-$85.00 apiece
  55. A breakfast table and chairs: $19.50-$39.50 per set
  56. A wool blanket: $6.98-$8.98 each
  57. A Coldwell lawn mower: $8.25-$21.50 each
  58. A football helmet: $3.50-$7.50 apiece
  59. Football shoes: $6.50 a pair
  60. A pencil sharpener: $0.69-$0.85 each
Sears, Roebuck & Co.—commonly known as Sears—was the Amazon of 1929.

Sears, Roebuck & Co.—commonly known as Sears—was the Amazon of 1929.

5. 1920's Slang Words and Phrases

During the 1920s, dozens of new slang words and expressions were added to the English language. Courtesy of ThompsonSchools.org, ThoughtCatalog.com, and ScaryMommy.com, here are 100 of the era’s best slang words and phrases:

  1. Applesauce: Nonsense
  2. Baloney: Nonsense
  3. Banana oil: Nonsense
  4. Bearcat: A lively, spirited woman
  5. Bee’s knees: An awesome person or thing
  6. Belly laugh: A loud, uninhibited laugh
  7. Bible Belt: An area in the South or Midwest where fundamentalist religion prevails
  8. Big cheese: An important person
  9. Bimbo: A macho man
  10. Blind date: A date with a person you’ve never met
  11. Blow: Leave
  12. Blower: Telephone
  13. Bo: Pal
  14. Bronx cheer: Making a noise similar to flatulence that may signify mockery
  15. Bull session: An informal discussion
  16. Bump off: To murder
  17. Bunk: Nonsense
  18. Cake-eater: A ladies’ man
  19. Cancelled stamp: A shy, lonely female
  20. Carry a torch: To suffer from unreturned love
  21. Cat’s meow: Anything or anyone that is wonderful
  22. Cheaters: Eyeglasses
  23. Chick: Woman
  24. Chisel: To swindle or cheat
  25. Chump: A gullible person
  26. Copacetic: Things are as they should be
  27. Crush: An romantic infatuation with a person
  28. Dame: Woman
  29. Darb: An awesome person or thing
  30. Dewdropper: A slacker who sits around all day and does nothing, oftentimes unemployed
  31. Dogs: Human feet
  32. Dope fiend: Drug addict
  33. Dumb Dora: A stupid girl
  34. Egg: A person who leads an extravagant life
  35. Fall guy: Someone who takes the blame
  36. Flapper: A typical young girl of the 1920s, “usually with a bobbed haircut, short skirt, and rolled stockings”
  37. Fella: Man
  38. Flat tire: A dull, boring person
  39. Flogger: Overcoat
  40. Fuzz: Police
  41. Gatecrasher: A person who attends a party without an invitation
  42. Giggle water: An alcoholic drink
  43. Gin mill: A place to illegally buy and consume alcohol
  44. Gold digger: A woman who uses charm to get money or favors from a man
  45. Goofy: Silly
  46. Grilled: Questioned
  47. Gyp: To cheat someone out of something
  48. Hayburner: A car with poor gas mileage
  49. Hard-boiled: Tough
  50. Heebie-jeebie: The jitters
  51. Hep: Wise
  52. High-hat: To act in a snobbish way toward someone
  53. Hunky: Suspicious
  54. Hokum: Nonsense
  55. Hooch: Bootleg liquor
  56. Hoofer: A chorus girl
  57. Horsefeathers: Nonsense
  58. Hotsy-totsy: Pleasing
  59. Jake: Okay, as in “Don’t worry, everything’s jake.”
  60. Jalopy: An old, busted-up car
  61. Java: Coffee
  62. Keen: Attractive, appealing
  63. Kiddo: A familiar way to address another person
  64. Kisser: The mouth
  65. Know your onions: To know what is going on
  66. Lid: Hat
  67. Line: Insincere flattery
  68. Lousy: Bad, contemptible
  69. Main drag: The most important street in a town or city
  70. Mazuma: Cash, money
  71. Mrs. Grundy: An uptight person
  72. Noodle juice: Tea
  73. Oliver Twist: An extremely good dancer
  74. On a toot: On a drinking binge
  75. Ossified: Drunk
  76. Peppy: Full of vitality
  77. Pinch: To arrest someone
  78. Pushover: A person who is easily taken advantage of
  79. Raspberry: Making a noise similar to flatulence that may signify mockery
  80. Reuben: A redneck
  81. Ritzy: Elegant
  82. Scram: To leave hurriedly
  83. Screwy: Crazy
  84. Sex appeal: Physical attractiveness
  85. Sheba: A young woman who is very attractive
  86. Sheik: A young man who is very attractive
  87. Smeller: The nose
  88. Speakeasy: A saloon or bar that sells bootleg alcohol
  89. Spifflicated: Drunk
  90. Spiffy: Having a fashionable appearance
  91. Stuck on: Having a crush on
  92. Swanky: Elegant
  93. Swell: Excellent
  94. The Real McCoy: A genuine person or thing
  95. To get the run-around: To be treated “evasively or misleadingly, especially in response to a request.”
  96. Tomato: A woman
  97. Torpedo: A hired gunman
  98. Upchuck: To vomit
  99. Upstage: Snobby
  100. Whoopee: Boisterous
In 1929, Amos 'n Andy, a sitcom set in Harlem—the historic center of black culture in New York City—debuted on the NBC Blue radio network.

In 1929, Amos 'n Andy, a sitcom set in Harlem—the historic center of black culture in New York City—debuted on the NBC Blue radio network.

6. Nobel Prize Winners

Beth Rowen tells us that winning a Nobel Prize is a life-changing honor. Whether the laureate is an internationally known figure (such as Mother Teresa) or a scientist from obscurity (like Richard R. Ernst), the award brings worldwide recognition that highlights one's life work and provides the funds to continue the mission.

This Nobel Prize information from 1929 has been made available courtesy of NobelPrize.com.

  • Chemistry: Arthur Harden and Hans von Euler-Chelpin
  • Literature: Thomas Mann
  • Peace: Frank B. Kellogg
  • Physics: Louis de Broglie
  • Physiology or medicine: Christiaan Eijkman and Frederick Gowland Hopkins

7. Best-Selling Novels

This information has been made available courtesy of PublishersWeekly.com.

  1. All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
  2. Dodsworth by Sinclair Lewis
  3. Dark Hester by Anne Douglas Sedgwick
  4. The Bishop Murder Case by S. S. Van Dine
  5. Roper's Row by Warwick Deeping
  6. Peder Victorious by O. E. Rolvaag
  7. Mamba's Daughters by DuBose Heyward
  8. The Galaxy by Susan Ertz
  9. Scarlet Sister Mary by Julia Peterkin
  10. Joseph and His Brethren by H. W. Freeman
The Broadway Melody was one of the greatest films of 1929. It was “MGM's first full-length musical feature, advertised as ‘all-talking, all-singing, all dancing.’”

The Broadway Melody was one of the greatest films of 1929. It was “MGM's first full-length musical feature, advertised as ‘all-talking, all-singing, all dancing.’”

8. 1929 in American Radio

KhanAcademy.org tells us that “After being introduced during World War I, radios became a common feature in American homes of the 1920s. Hundreds of radio stations popped up over the course of the decade. These stations developed and broadcasted news, serial stories, and political speeches. Much like in print media, advertising space was interspersed with entertainment. Yet, unlike with magazines and newspapers, advertisers did not have to depend on the active participation of consumers: Advertisers could reach out to anyone within listening distance of the radio. On the other hand, a broader audience meant advertisers had to be more conservative and careful not to offend anyone.”

Eh.net.Encyclopedia adds that "Radio broadcasting was the cheapest form of entertainment, and it provided the public with far better entertainment than most people were accustomed to. As a result, its popularity grew rapidly in the late 1920s and early 1930s, and by 1934, 60 percent of the nation’s households had radios. One and a half million cars were also equipped with them. The 1930s were the Golden Age of radio. It was so popular that theaters dared not open until after the extremely popular 'Amos ‘n Andy' show was over."

Here are some of the memorable events from 1929 radio:

  1. Date unknown: The Chase and Sanborn Hour, a comedy and variety program, debuted on NBC.
  2. January 8: CBS purchased the New York City radio station WABC from the Atlantic Broadcasting Company.
  3. January 14: Empire Builders—an old-time western series—premiered on NBC.
  4. January 17: Aunt Jemima, a variety program starring Tess Gardella, debuted on CBS.
  5. July 15: Music & the Spoken Word, a religious series, premiered on the CBS radio network. It would later become the longest-running network radio program in the U.S.
  6. August 19: Amos 'n Andy, a sitcom set in Harlem—the historic center of black culture in New York City—debuted on the NBC Blue radio network. FamilySearch.org tells us that Amos ‘n Andy “was based around the taxicab business of Amos Jones, his friend Andrew Hogg Brown, and George ‘Kingfish’ Stevens. It lasted more than 30 years.”
  7. October 1: Blackstone Plantation, a musical variety program, premiered on CBS.
  8. October 24: Fleischmann's Yeast Hour—starring Rudy Vallee—debuted on NBC.
  9. November 3: FamilySearch.org tells us that on November 3, 1929, "Chicago’s WSBC introduced The All-Negro Hour, the first variety show with all African American entertainers. The show helped pave the way for better representation of African Americans in radio and entertainment." TeachRock.org adds that "The program, hosted by former vaudeville performer Jack L. Cooper, featured music, comedy, and serial dramas. 'The All-Negro Hour' went off the air in 1935, but Cooper continued to host and produce Black-oriented programming for WSBC."
  10. November 6: Week in Westminster, a weekly political program, premiered on the BBC Home Service. It would still be running over 90 years later.
  11. November 20: The Rise of the Goldbergs, starring Gertrude Berg, debuted on NBC.

In 1929, the following USA-based radio stations began broadcasting:

  1. On January 9, KDB-AM in Santa Barbara, California began broadcasting.
  2. On February 8, KOY-AM in Phoenix, Arizona began broadcasting.
  3. On February 16, KID-AM in Idaho Falls, Idaho began broadcasting.
  4. On March 16, WHP-AM in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania began broadcasting.
  5. On March 22, KIT-AM in Yakima, Washington began broadcasting.
  6. On April 11, KLO-AM in Ogden, Utah began broadcasting.
  7. On May 9, WJW-AM in Cleveland, Ohio began broadcasting.
In 1929, the Philadelphia Athletics won the World Series.

In 1929, the Philadelphia Athletics won the World Series.

9. Greatest Films of 1929

This movie trivia has been made available courtesy of FilmSite.org.

Recommended for You

  1. Alibi
  2. Applause
  3. Blackmail
  4. Un Chien Andalou (An Andalusian Dog)
  5. Disraeli
  6. Pandora's Box
  7. The Broadway Melody
  8. The Cocoanuts
  9. Coquette
  10. The Hollywood Revue of 1929
  11. The Love Parade
  12. The Man With a Movie Camera
  13. The Virginian

With the addition of sound, movies became an increasingly popular form of entertainment. Here is a list of sound feature films from January 1929 along with their release dates:

  1. Sal of Singapore (January 4, 1929)
  2. Captain Lash (January 6, 1929)
  3. The Jazz Age (January 6, 1929)
  4. The Last Warning (January 6, 1929)
  5. Synthetic Sin (January 9, 1929)
  6. The Rescue (January 12, 1929)
  7. Man, Woman and Wife (January 13, 1929)
  8. I Kiss Your Hand, Madame (January 16, 1929)
  9. The Flying Fleet (January 19, 1929)
  10. Geraldine (January 20, 1929)
  11. True Heaven (January 20, 1929)
  12. Lady of the Pavements (January 22, 1929)
  13. The Bellamy Trial (January 23, 1929)
  14. The Doctor’s Secret (January 26, 1929)
  15. Fancy Baggage (January 26, 1929)
  16. Red Hot Speed (January 27, 1929)
  17. Seven Footprints to Satan (January 27, 1929)
  18. Fugitives (January 27, 1929)
  19. Noisy Neighbours (January 27, 1929)
  20. Moulin Rouge (January 30, 1929)

10. Ten Best Horror Movies of the Year

This film trivia from 1929 has been made available courtesy of IMDB.com.

  1. Un Chien Andalou
  2. The Skeleton Dance
  3. The Last Warning
  4. Seven Footprints to Satan
  5. The Mysterious Island
  6. The Haunted House
  7. Hell’s Bells
  8. The Unholy Night
  9. Cagliostro (Cagliostro Leben und Liebe eines großen Abenteurers)
  10. House of Horror

11. Biggest Pop Music Artists and Groups

Popular music artists and groups from 1929 included Aaron Copland, Al Jolson, Benny Goodman, Bessie Smith, Buddy Rich, the Carter Family, Cliff Edwards, Eddie Cantor, Ethel Waters, Fred Waring and His Pennsylvanians, Gene Austin, George Olson, Guy Lombardo, Jeannette MacDonald, Jimmie Rodgers, Johnny Hamp and His Orchestra, Leo Reisman & His Orchestra, Louis Armstrong, Nick Lucas, Paul Whiteman & His Orchestra, the RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra, Rudy Vallee & His Connecticut Yankees, Ted Lewis and His Band, Ted Weems & His Orchestra, the Mills Brothers, the Rhythm Boys, and Tommy Dorsey.

12. Top 40 Songs for the Year

This music trivia from 1929 has been made available courtesy of Playback.fm.

  1. Eddie Cantor: Makin’ Whoopee
  2. Fats Waller: Ain’t Misbehavin’
  3. Ethel Waters: Am I Blue?
  4. Cliff Edwards: Singin’ in the Rain
  5. Charley Patton: Pony Blues
  6. Nick Lucas: Tip Toe Thru’ The Tulips With Me
  7. Louis Armstrong: When You’re Smiling
  8. Rudy Vallee & His Connecticut Yankees: Honey
  9. Bob Haring & His Orchestra: Pagan Love Song
  10. Guy Lombardo: Sweethearts on Parade
  11. Maurice Chevalier: Louise
  12. Gene Austin: California Moon
  13. George Olsen: A Precious Little Thing Called Love
  14. Al Jolson: Little Pal
  15. Paul Whiteman: Great Day
  16. Leo Reisman: The Wedding of the Painted Doll
  17. Jimmie Rodgers: Waiting For the Train
  18. Peter Dawson: The Admiral’s Broom
  19. Mario Reis: Gosto Que Me Enrosco
  20. Coon-Sanders Orchestra: Little Orphan Annie
  21. Leo Reisman: With a Song In My Heart
  22. Guy Lombardo: College Medley Fox Trot
  23. Bessie Smith: Nobody Knows You When You’re Down & Out
  24. Louis Armstrong: St. James Infirmary
  25. Duke Ellington: The Mooche
  26. Al Jolson: Liza (All the Clouds’ll Roll Away)
  27. The Kentucky Serenaders: If I Had a Talking Picture of You
  28. Bert Ambrose & His Orchestra: Tip Toe Thru’ The Tulips With Me
  29. Patrício Teixeira: Trepa no Coqueiro
  30. Ruth Etting: Exactly Like You
  31. Rudy Vallee & His Connecticut Yankees: Coquette
  32. Arnold Johnson & His Orchestra: Breakaway
  33. Cliff Edwards: Just You, Just Me
  34. Arden-Ohman Orchestra: Strike Up the Band
  35. Rudy Vallee & His Connecticut Yankees: Lonely Troubadour
  36. Al Jolson: I’m in Seventh Heaven
  37. Nick Lucas: Painting the Clouds with Sunshine
  38. Rudy Vallee & His Connecticut Yankees: Deep Night
  39. Leo Reisman: Ain’t Misbehavin’
  40. Ben Selvin: My Sin
In 1929, salmon rolls were a popular food trend.

In 1929, salmon rolls were a popular food trend.

13. Food and Beverage Trivia

What foods were popular during the 1920s? According to The Classroom.com, “Tea sandwiches became popular, and even upscale restaurants served appetizers on toast points. Restaurants served caviar and salmon rolls, cheese balls and shrimp, and lobster and mushroom toast. Deviled eggs saw their start during this decade as well. Other finger foods that were popular in American homes included olives, celery, and pickles. Salted nuts were always set out at dinner parties—primarily pecans, peanuts, almonds, and filberts. Crackers were served as appetizers, usually with an assortment of relishes.

TheClassroom.com adds that during the 1920s, “The average American kitchen became wired with electricity, which meant that foods could be kept frozen. As a result, many companies, including Birdseye, started developing and marketing frozen dinners.”

What about alcohol? It was Prohibition, wasn’t it? TheSpruceEats.com tells us that Prohibition during the 1920s may have banned liquor, but spirits flowed freely in back alleys, speakeasies, and on the countrysides of America. “During Prohibition, there wasn't a lot of choice in brandy, gin, rum, or whiskey. Many people had to drink whatever they could get. Whether that was smuggled booze from the rum runners, doctored up ‘whiskey’ or moonshine, or bathtub gin, quality was not always a guarantee.”

TheSpruceEats adds that “Much of the bar activity also took the short trip to Cuba. There, drinkers could spend a weekend enjoying a few drinks without the threat of a police raid and bartenders could work their magic in the open. It was the time of daiquiris, mojitos, and other favorite rum cocktails, offering temporary respite from the troubles back home.”

Courtesy of TasteOfHome.com, here are 40 vintage recipes from the era:

  1. Oysters Rockefeller
  2. Icebox cake (This cake is made from chocolate wafers and whipping cream.)
  3. Old-world puffed pancakes
  4. Cranberry-orange roast ducklings
  5. Duchess potatoes
  6. Great-grandma’s Italian meatballs
  7. State fair cream puffs
  8. Parsnip and celery root bisque
  9. Grandma’s divinity candy
  10. Slow-cooked chicken a la king
  11. Derby hot browns
  12. Vanilla white chocolate mousse
  13. Simple Waldorf salad
  14. Old-fashioned butterscotch cake with penuche frosting
  15. Makeover deviled eggs
  16. Chicken salad croissant sandwiches
  17. Classic pineapple upside-down cake
  18. Fluffy cranberry mousse
  19. The ultimate chicken noodle soup
  20. Lemon ginger icebox cake
  21. Salmon mousse cups
  22. Blackened pork Caesar salad
  23. Strawberry Charlotte
  24. Summer tea sandwiches
  25. Hearty Manhattan clam chowder
  26. Old-fashioned tapioca
  27. Warm spiced cider punch
  28. Cheesy cream of asparagus soup
  29. Jazzy gelatin
  30. Bourbon-glazed ham
  31. Honey whole wheat rolls
  32. Garden-fresh seafood cocktail
  33. Super grilled cheese sandwiches
  34. Olive-stuffed celery
  35. Authentic German potato salad
  36. Strawberry lady finger icebox cake
  37. Mom’s Favorite Olive Burgers
  38. Apple cinnamon jelly
  39. Peach Bavarian
  40. Spiced devil's food cake
In 1929, finger foods that were popular in American homes included olives, celery, and pickles.

In 1929, finger foods that were popular in American homes included olives, celery, and pickles.

14. 101 Popular Prohibition-Era Sandwiches

Courtesy of FoodTimeline.org, here are 85 popular Depression-era sandwiches:

  1. American cheese
  2. American cheese and anchovies
  3. American cheese and chili sauce
  4. American cheese and nut
  5. Anchovy
  6. Banana and nut
  7. Baked bean sandwich
  8. Beef and dill pickle
  9. Beef jelly sandwich
  10. Beefsteak
  11. Boston brown bread and chopped peanuts
  12. Boston brown bread and grated cheese
  13. Bread and Butter (no filling)
  14. Calf's liver
  15. Canton ginger
  16. Caviar
  17. Chicken salad
  18. Chopped fig
  19. Chopped meat and pickles
  20. Chopped nuts and dates
  21. Chopped olives and walnuts
  22. Celery
  23. Celery and uncooked cabbage
  24. Chicken and nut
  25. Club
  26. Crab meat and grated cheese
  27. Crab meat and pimento
  28. Cream cheese and peanut butter
  29. Cream cheese and pimento
  30. Cream cheese and olive
  31. Cream cheese and stuffed olive
  32. Cream cheese, pimento, and shredded pineapple
  33. Crust butter sandwich
  34. Corned beef
  35. Cuban sandwich
  36. Cucumber
  37. Cucumber and radish
  38. Date and nut
  39. Deviled chicken
  40. Deviled crab meat
  41. Deviled egg
  42. Deviled ham
  43. Dixieland sandwich
  44. Egg
  45. Egg and sardine
  46. Five course sandwich
  47. Fried egg
  48. Green pepper
  49. Green pepper and pimento
  50. Ham
  51. Honolulu sandwich
  52. Jam
  53. Jelly
  54. Lettuce
  55. Lettuce and cucumber
  56. Lettuce and radish
  57. Liverwurst
  58. Lobster and lettuce
  59. Lobster and chopped egg
  60. Malaga grape and nut
  61. Minced chicken
  62. Minced chicken and ham
  63. Minced chicken livers and lobster
  64. Minced chicken livers and shrimp
  65. Minced ham
  66. Minced turkey
  67. Nut and celery
  68. Oyster and lettuce
  69. Peanut butter
  70. Pigs-in-a-blanket sandwich
  71. Pimento
  72. Roast beef
  73. Roast pork
  74. Roquefort cheese and tomato
  75. Salmon and lettuce
  76. Salmon bite sandwich
  77. Sardine
  78. Sardine and tomato
  79. Sardolive sandwich
  80. Shrimp and lettuce
  81. Sliced chicken
  82. Sliced turkey
  83. Stuffed olive
  84. Substantial sandwich
  85. Swiss cheese
  86. Tiger eyes sandwich
  87. Tomato and cucumber
  88. Tomato and egg
  89. Tomato and green pepper
  90. Tomato and horseradish
  91. Tomato and lettuce
  92. Tomato soup sandwich
  93. Tongue
  94. Tree sandwich
  95. Tuna
  96. Turtle sandwich
  97. Tutti frutti sandwich
  98. Waldorf salad
  99. Watercress
  100. Watercress and cucumber
  101. Watercress and tomato
In 1929, Silver Spring Foods, the world's largest grower and producer of horseradish, was founded.

In 1929, Silver Spring Foods, the world's largest grower and producer of horseradish, was founded.

15. Famous Birthdays

Here are some of the famous people who were born in 1929:

  1. Anne Frank: Non-fiction writer
  2. Arnold Palmer: Professional golfer
  3. Audrey Hepburn: Movie actress
  4. Barbara Walters: Journalist
  5. Berry Gordy, Jr.: Entrepreneur
  6. Bob Newhart: TV actor
  7. Buck Owens: Country singer
  8. Bud Spencer: Movie actor
  9. Christopher Plummer: Movie actor
  10. Dick Clark: Entrepreneur
  11. Ed Asner: Movie actor
  12. Eddie Garcia: Movie actor
  13. Frank Gehry: Architect
  14. Grace Kelly: Movie actress
  15. Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis: First Lady
  16. Jane Powell: Movie actress
  17. Jean Simmons: Movie actress
  18. June Carter Cash: Country singer
  19. June Squibb: Movie actress
  20. Martin Luther King Jr.: Civil rights leader

16. Notable Weddings

These trivia facts have been made available courtesy of OnThisDay.com.

  1. On January 28, mobster Bugsy Siegel wed his childhood sweetheart Esta Krakower.
  2. On March 29, actress and dancer Ginger Rogers married her dancing partner Jack Pepper.
  3. On April 17, baseball legend Babe Ruth wed Claire Merritt Hodgson.
  4. On May 27, aviator Charles Lindbergh married author Anne Morrow.
  5. On June 3, actor and World War II naval officer Douglas Fairbanks Jr. wed actress Joan Crawford.
  6. On June 20, author William Faulkner married Estelle Oldham.
  7. On July 22, American playwright Eugene O'Neill wed actress Carlotta Monterey.
  8. On October 12, U.S. military leader George Marshall married Katherine Tupper.
  9. On October 21, bank robber Willie Sutton wed Louise Leudemann.
  10. On November 13, writer E. B. White married literary editor Katharine Angell.
  11. On November 23, Academy Award-winning actress Shirley Booth wed comic actor Ed Gardner.
In 1929, Pine-Sol household cleaner was invented by Harry A. Cole of Jackson, Mississippi.

In 1929, Pine-Sol household cleaner was invented by Harry A. Cole of Jackson, Mississippi.

17. Famous People Who Died

This information has been made available courtesy of FamousBirthdays.com.

  1. Antoine Bourdelle: Sculptor
  2. Bertram Windle: Anatomist
  3. Blind Lemon Jefferson: Blues singer
  4. Bliss Carman: Poet
  5. Bramwell Booth: Religious leader
  6. Charles Cooley: Sociologist
  7. Charles F. Brush: Entrepreneur
  8. David Dunbar Buick: Entrepreneur
  9. Dustin Farnum: Movie actor
  10. Elijah McCoy: Inventor
  11. Emile Berliner: Entrepreneur
  12. Henry Blake Fuller: Novelist
  13. James Hozier: Politician
  14. Jeanne Eagels: Movie actress
  15. Joe McGinnity: Baseball player
  16. Josef Murgas: Inventor
  17. Karl Benz: Engineer
  18. Katharine Lee Bates: Painter
  19. Lillie Langtry: Stage actress
  20. Louis Marshall: Lawyer
  21. Miller Huggins: Baseball player
  22. Tex Rickard: Sports executive
  23. Wilds P. Richardson: Explorer
  24. William Russel: Movie actor
  25. Wyatt Earp: Law enforcement officer

18. Largest U.S. Companies

These corporate facts have been made available courtesy of AmericanBusinessHistory.org.

  1. Standard Oil (New Jersey)
  2. General Motors
  3. Ford Motor Company
  4. U.S. Steel
  5. Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company
  6. Swift & Co.
  7. Armour & Co.
  8. Standard Oil (Indiana)
  9. Sears Roebuck
  10. General Electric
  11. Western Electric
  12. Chrysler
  13. Bethlehem Steel
  14. International Harvester
  15. Borden
  16. Anaconda Copper Mining
  17. F. W. Woolworth
  18. National Dairy Products
  19. Montgomery Ward
  20. Gulf Oil
  21. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco
  22. Goodyear Tire & Rubber
  23. Shell Union Oil
  24. Westinghouse Electric
  25. Texas Corporation
In 1929, over 800,000 refrigerators were sold in the United States.

In 1929, over 800,000 refrigerators were sold in the United States.

19. U.S. Automobile Production Figures for the Year

Here are the U.S. automobile production figures for 1929:

  1. Ford: 1,507,132
  2. Chevrolet: 1,328,605
  3. Hudson/Essex: 300,962
  4. Willys-Overland/Whippet: 242,000
  5. Pontiac/Oakland: 211,054
  6. Buick: 196,104
  7. Dodge: 124,557
  8. Nash: 116,622

20. American Companies and Brands Established During 1929

  1. American States Water Co.: A water and electricity utility company that is located in San Dimas, California.
  2. Carvel: An ice cream franchise.
  3. Cintas: A company that provides products and services to businesses to help them keep their facilities and workspaces clean and safe. Cintas provides uniforms, mats, mops, cleaning and restroom supplies, first aid and safety products, fire extinguishers and testing, and safety courses to its clients.
  4. General Foods Corporation: A cereal business.
  5. Hawaiian Airlines: The tenth-largest commercial airline in the U.S.
  6. National Steel Corporation (1929–2003): At one time, a major American steel producer.
  7. O-I Glass: A company that specializes in container glass products.
  8. Rowell Laboratories: A pharmaceutical manufacturing company.
  9. Screen Gems, Inc.: A film production and distribution studio.
  10. Silver Spring Foods: The world's largest grower and producer of horseradish.
  11. Tom’s Convenience Stores: A chain of gas station and convenience stores that is based in York, Pennsylvania. Tom's currently has eight locations throughout central Pennsylvania, all of which are open 24 hours.
  12. Wiggins Airways: An American cargo airline that is based in Manchester, New Hampshire. It operates from the Manchester–Boston Regional Airport.
In 1929, the F. W. Woolworth Company was one of America’s most successful five-and-dime businesses.

In 1929, the F. W. Woolworth Company was one of America’s most successful five-and-dime businesses.

References:

In 1929, the Montgomery Ward catalog—a precursor to the Amazon.com website—was an essential possession in many American households.

In 1929, the Montgomery Ward catalog—a precursor to the Amazon.com website—was an essential possession in many American households.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2021 Gregory DeVictor

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