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1930 Fun Facts and Trivia

Gregory DeVictor is a trivia enthusiast who loves to write articles on American nostalgia.

This article teaches you fun facts, trivia, and historical events from the year 1930.

This article teaches you fun facts, trivia, and historical events from the year 1930.

Why Was the Year 1930 so Special?

What are some fun facts, trivia, and historical events from the year 1930? What were the top news stories in the U.S. and around the world? What happened in the business and financial sectors, in science, technology, sports, the entertainment industry, and in everyday life? What about famous birthdays, marriages, and deaths that year?

  1. In 1930, America was in the early stages of the Great Depression (August 1929 to March 1939), “the deepest and longest-lasting economic downturn in the history of the Western industrialized world up to that time.” GDP growth was -8.5%, inflation was -2.34%, and four million Americans who were looking for work could not find it.
  2. President Hoover asked Congress for $150 million to fund a public works program that would create jobs and stimulate the American economy.
  3. The United States Department of Veterans Affairs was established.
  4. Judge Joseph Crater of the New York State Supreme Court walked out of a 45th Street restaurant in Manhattan—on his way to a show at the Belasco Theater. He mysteriously disappeared, and was never heard from again. Judge Crater’s disappearance “launched a massive investigation that captivated the nation, earning Crater the title of ‘the missingest man in New York.’”
  5. The most populous states were New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Ohio, and Texas, and the least populous ones were Nevada, Wyoming, Delaware, Vermont, and New Mexico.
  6. The American astronomer Clyde Tombaugh discovered the planet Pluto.
  7. Eastern Airlines began regular passenger service, and Ellen Church became the world’s first flight attendant.
  8. On January 15, the Moon was closer to Earth (356,397 km) than at any time in recent history. (The Moon’s average distance from Earth is 382,900 km.)
  9. The 1,046-foot Chrysler Building—the tallest man-made structure at the time—opened to the public in New York City.
  10. Farmers made up 21% of the labor force. There were about 6,295,000 farms in the United States, averaging about 157 acres apiece.
  11. In 1930, the U.S. tobacco industry produced over 123 billion cigarettes.
  12. BBC radio in London uniquely reported: "Good evening. Today is Good Friday. There is no news."
  13. A large hurricane in the Caribbean devastated most of Santo Domingo, the capital and largest city of the Dominican Republic.
  14. The Green Bay Packers were the NFL champs, the Philadelphia Athletics won their second straight World Series, and the Montreal Canadiens clinched the Stanley Cup.
  15. Babe Ruth signed a two-year contract for $160,000 with the New York Yankees.
  16. Construction began on Cleveland’s Lakefront Stadium, one of the early stadiums that was built to accommodate both baseball and football.
  17. The Motion Pictures Production Code, also known as the Hays Code, was instituted in the United States. It imposed “strict guidelines on the treatment of sex, crime, religion and violence in films for the next 40 years.”
  18. At the 2nd Academy Awards—which honored the best films of 1929—The Broadway Melody won an Oscar for Best Picture, Frank Llyod (The Divine Lady) won an Oscar for Best Director, Warner Baxter (In Old Arizona) won an Oscar for Best Actor, and Mary Pickford (Coquette) won an Oscar for Best Actress.
  19. The Mickey Mouse and Blondie comic strips both debuted. Likewise, the cartoon character Betty Boop appeared for the first time in the animated film, Dizzy Dishes.
  20. The fast food restaurant chain—KFC (Kentucky Fried Chicken)—was founded by Colonel Harland Sanders in North Corbin, Kentucky.
  21. Publix, one of America’s largest grocery store chains, was established by George W. Jenkins.
  22. Clarence Birdseye’s frozen foods went on sale for the first time in Springfield, Massachusetts.
  23. Consumer products introduced in 1930 include Breck shampoo, electric shavers, Friskies cat food, Halls cough drops, Jiffy cake and muffin mixes, Kraft mayonnaise, Scotch tape, Snickers candy bars, Tums antacid tablets, Twinkies snack cakes, and Zagnut candy bars.
  24. Clint Eastwood, Don Shula, Gene Hackman, Neil Armstrong, Princess Margaret, Ray Charles, Sandra Day O’Connor, Sean Connery, and Warren Buffet were all born.
  25. At the 6th National Spelling Bee, 14-year-old Helen Jensen of Council Bluffs, Iowa correctly spelled the word “albumen.”

This article teaches you fun facts, trivia, and historical events from the year 1930. Find out about popular movies, music, books, foods, sports facts, famous birthdays, and other cool pop culture trends to get the right mix of questions and answers for your 1930s-themed trivia game.

KFC—short for Kentucky Fried Chicken—is an American fast food restaurant chain that specializes in fried chicken. Founded in 1930 by Colonel Harland Sanders, it is the world's second-largest restaurant chain with 22,621 locations in 150 countries.

KFC—short for Kentucky Fried Chicken—is an American fast food restaurant chain that specializes in fried chicken. Founded in 1930 by Colonel Harland Sanders, it is the world's second-largest restaurant chain with 22,621 locations in 150 countries.

Table of Contents

For easier reading and referencing, I have divided this article into the following categories:

  1. Retail Prices in the Year 1930
  2. History Facts From the USA and World
  3. 1930 United States Census
  4. Sports Trivia
  5. Miscellaneous Fun Facts, Trivia, and Pop Culture Trends
  6. 1930's Slang Words and Phrases
  7. Nobel Prize Winners
  8. Best-Selling Novels
  9. 1930 in American Radio
  10. Greatest Films of 1930
  11. Animated Films (Cartoons) Released in 1930
  12. Broadway Shows That Opened
  13. Biggest Pop Music Artists and Groups
  14. Top 25 Songs for the Year
  15. Depression-Era Dining
  16. Famous Birthdays
  17. Notable Weddings
  18. Famous People Who Died
  19. U.S. Automobile Production Figures for the Year
  20. Companies and Retailers From 1930 That Are Still in Business Today
In 1930, milk cost 26 cents a gallon, bread was eight cents a loaf, and eggs were 15 cents a dozen. Four pounds of bananas cost 19 cents, sirloin steak was 39 cents a pound, and pork and beans were five cents a can.

In 1930, milk cost 26 cents a gallon, bread was eight cents a loaf, and eggs were 15 cents a dozen. Four pounds of bananas cost 19 cents, sirloin steak was 39 cents a pound, and pork and beans were five cents a can.

1. Retail Prices in the Year 1930

These retail facts have been made available courtesy of the Morris County Public Library in Whippany, NJ. and from OnCourseSystems.com.

Remember, $1.00 in 1930 is worth about $15.86 today.

Groceries:

  1. Applesauce: Three cans for 20 cents
  2. Bacon: 38 cents a pound
  3. Baked ham (sliced): 39 cents a pound
  4. Bananas: 19 cents for four pounds
  5. Beef (prime rib): 29 cents a pound
  6. Beef (sirloin steak): 39 cents a pound
  7. Bran flakes: 10 cents a box
  8. Bread: Eight cents for a 16-ounce loaf
  9. Cabbage: Three cents a pound
  10. Campbell’s soup: Four cans for 25 cents
  11. Cereal (Kellogg’s corn flakes): Three boxes for 25 cents
  12. Cereal (Quaker Crackles): Two boxes for 25 cents
  13. Cheese (Swiss, imported): 59 cents a pound
  14. Cheese (Wisconsin): 23 cents a pound
  15. Chicken: 35 cents for a whole fryer
  16. Chuck roast: 15 cents a pound
  17. Cocoa (Hershey’s): 15 cents for an eight-ounce can
  18. Coffee: 39 cents for a one-pound tin
  19. Eggs: 15 cents per dozen
  20. Fresh peas: Four cents a pound
  21. Grapes: Three pounds for 25 cents
  22. Hot cross buns: 16 cents a dozen
  23. Hot dogs: Eight cents a pound
  24. Iceberg lettuce: Seven cents a head
  25. Ketchup: Nine cents a bottle
  26. Lamb: 17 cents a pound
  27. Macaroni (White Rose): Three 16-ounce boxes for 25 cents
  28. Milk: 26 cents a gallon
  29. Mixed nuts: 19 cents a pound
  30. Oranges: Two dozen for 25 cents
  31. Peanut butter: 23 cents a jar
  32. Pink salmon: Two tall cans for 25 cents
  33. Pork and beans: Five cents a can
  34. Potatoes: 18 cents for 10 pounds
  35. Sardines (Del Monte): Two large oval cans for 25 cents
  36. Spinach: Five cents a pound
  37. Sugar: 49 cents for 10 pounds

Clothing:

  1. A boy’s suit (wool): $9.49 apiece
  2. A girl’s dress (velvet and silk): $4.98 apiece
  3. A man’s coat (tweed and herringbone weave): $21.75-$35.00 apiece
  4. A man’s golf sweater: $3.95-$4.95 each
  5. A man’s necktie (silk): $1.00-$1.50 apiece
  6. A man’s shirt: $1.95
  7. A man’s suit: $25.00
  8. A pair of woman's shoes (leather heels): $10.00
  9. A pair of woman’s stockings (silk): 89 cents
  10. A woman’s coat (fur trim): $59.50-$110.00 apiece
  11. A woman’s dress (rayon): $2.49 each
  12. Gloves: $4.95-$5.50 a pair

Household goods and personal care items:

  1. A 9” aluminum frying pan with a wooden handle: $1.75
  2. A bed, box spring, and mattress set: $23.50
  3. A braided rug (24” x 48”): $1.95
  4. A gas stove: $136.25
  5. A griddle: $1.00-$1.60 apiece
  6. A mattress (full size, 54” x 75”): $15.98 each
  7. Ammonia: 19 cents for a big bottle
  8. An electric heater: $2.75 each
  9. Blankets (100% wool, 66” x 80”): $15.98 apiece
  10. Laxative (Phillips milk of magnesia): 33-50 cents a bottle
  11. Lux laundry soap: 22 cents a box
  12. Scouring pads (Brillo): 15 cents for a large box
  13. Soap (bath, Lifebuoy): Three cakes for 19 cents
  14. Toilet tissue: Two rolls for nine cents
  15. Toothpaste: 27 cents a tube
  16. Window shades: 49 cents apiece

Miscellaneous items:

  1. A daily newspaper: Two cents
  2. A permanent wave: $7.00
  3. A typewriter (Underwood standard): $37.50
  4. A Webster’s desk dictionary: 79 cents-$1.25 each
  5. Golf (indoor, 19 holes): 15 cents for children and 35 cents for adults
  6. Halloween costumes: $1.95 apiece
  7. Stationery (printed): 79 cents-$1.00 a box
In 1930, America was in the early stages of the Great Depression, “the deepest and longest-lasting economic downturn in the history of the Western industrialized world up to that time.”

In 1930, America was in the early stages of the Great Depression, “the deepest and longest-lasting economic downturn in the history of the Western industrialized world up to that time.”

2. History Facts From the USA and World

  1. In 1930, America was in the early stages of the Great Depression (August 1929 to March 1939), “the deepest and longest-lasting economic downturn in the history of the Western industrialized world up to that time.” GDP growth was -8.5%, inflation was -2.34%, and four million Americans who were looking for work could not find it.
  2. Herbert Hoover was president of the United States, and Charles Curtis was the vice-president.
  3. The 71st United States Congress was in session. It met from March 4, 1929 to March 4, 1931, during the first two years of Herbert Hoover's presidency.
  4. January 5: The notorious bank robbers Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow met for the first time. Bonnie and Clyde traveled throughout the central United States between 1931 and 1934, and became known for their brazen bank robberies as well as for robbing small stores and rural gas stations. They were also believed “to have murdered at least nine police officers and four civilians.”
  5. January 6: Clessie Cummins, the founder of the Cummins Engine Co., completed a trip from Indianapolis, Indiana to New York City in the first diesel-powered automobile.
  6. January 15: The Moon was closer to Earth (356,397 km) than at any time in recent history. (The Moon’s average distance from Earth is 382,900 km.)
  7. January 18: The temperature fell to -27°F in Watts, Oklahoma, setting a state record.
  8. January 26: Cleveland’s 52-story Terminal Tower opened.
  9. February 3: The Communist Party of Vietnam was established.
  10. February 18: The American astronomer Clyde Tombaugh discovered the planet Pluto.
  11. February 26: The first red and green traffic lights were installed in New York City.
  12. March 6: Clarence Birdseye’s frozen foods went on sale for the first time in Springfield, Massachusetts.
  13. March 7: The New York Times agreed to begin capitalizing the letter “n” in the word “Negro.”
  14. March 8: Babe Ruth signed a two-year contract for $160,000 with the New York Yankees. (By the way, $160,000 in 1930 is worth $2,423,014 today.)
  15. March 20: The fast food restaurant chain—KFC (Kentucky Fried Chicken)—was founded by Colonel Harland Sanders in North Corbin, Kentucky. Today, KFC is the world's second-largest restaurant chain —after McDonald’s—with 22,621 locations in 150 countries.
  16. March 26: Congress allocated $50,000 to build an inter-American highway that would connect the northern part of North America with the southern part of South America.
  17. March 31: The Motion Pictures Production Code, also known as the Hays Code, was instituted in the United States. It imposed “strict guidelines on the treatment of sex, crime, religion and violence in films for the next 40 years.”
  18. April 6: Hostess Twinkies were invented. TheSpruceEats.com tells us that Twinkies were first produced by the Continental Baking Company in Illinois “as a way to use shortbread pans that were no longer in use.”
  19. April 17: DuPont invented Neoprene—a family of synthetic rubbers that “exhibit good chemical stability and maintain flexibility over a wide temperature range.”
  20. April 18: BBC radio in London uniquely reported: "Good evening. Today is Good Friday. There is no news."
  21. April 21: A fire at the Ohio State Penitentiary in Columbus killed 320 people.
  22. April 21: Clarence DeMar won the 34th Boston Marathon.
  23. May 10: The first planetarium in the U.S. opened in Chicago.
  24. May 15: Ellen Church became the world’s first flight attendant, “when she embarked on a Boeing Air Transport, 20-hour flight from Oakland [California] to Chicago.”
  25. May 27: The 1,046-foot Chrysler Building—the tallest man-made structure at the time—opened to the public in New York City.
  26. May 30: Bill Arnold won the Indianapolis 500.
  27. June 2: Sarah Dickson became the first female Presbyterian elder in Cincinnati.
  28. June 9: The Chicago Tribune journalist Jake Lingle was murdered at the Illinois Central Train Station over a $100,000 gambling debt owed to Al Capone.
  29. June 14: The Bureau of Narcotics was established under the United States Department of the Treasury, “which replaced the Narcotics Division of the Prohibition Unit.”
  30. June 17: President Hoover signed the Smoot–Hawley Tariff Act into law, which “implemented protectionist trade policies in the United States.”
  31. June 24: Construction began on Cleveland’s Lakefront Stadium, one of the early stadiums that was built to accommodate both baseball and football.
  32. July 5: The Seventh Lambeth Conference of Anglican bishops opened, and approved “the use of birth control in limited circumstances, a move away from the Christian views on contraception.”
  33. July 7: Construction began on the Hoover Dam, which was located along the Colorado River between the states of Nevada and Arizona.
  34. July 20: The temperature hit 106°F in Washington, DC, setting a district record.
  35. July 21: The United States Department of Veterans Affairs was established.
  36. July 21: The temperature reached 110°F in Millsboro, Delaware, setting a state record.
  37. July 28: The temperature hit 114°F in Greensburg, Kentucky, setting another state record.
  38. July 29: The temperature reached 115°F in Holly Springs, Mississippi, setting another state record.
  39. August 6: Judge Joseph Crater of the New York State Supreme Court walked out of a 45th Street restaurant in Manhattan—on his way to a show at the Belasco Theater. He mysteriously disappeared, and was never heard from again.
  40. August 9: The temperature hit 113°F in Perryville, Tennessee, setting another state record.
  41. August 18: Eastern Airlines began regular passenger service.
  42. September 3: A large hurricane in the Caribbean devastated most of Santo Domingo, the capital and largest city of the Dominican Republic.
  43. September 8: Scotch tape, invented by Richard Gurley Drew, was sold for the first time by the 3M Company.
  44. September 8: Hebrew was taught for the first time in the New York City public schools.
  45. October 8: The Philadelphia Athletics won their second straight World Series by defeating the St. Louis Cardinals, 7–1, in Game 6.
  46. November 3: In San Francisco, the Bank of Italy was renamed the Bank of America.
  47. December 2: President Hoover asked Congress for $150 million to fund a public works program that would create jobs and stimulate the American economy.
  48. December 11: The Bank of the United States—the fourth largest bank in New York City—closed its doors.
  49. December 19: Writer and civil rights activist James Weldon Johnson resigned as the executive director of the NAACP.
  50. In 1930, the U.S. tobacco industry produced over 123 billion cigarettes.
In 1930, the Montreal Canadiens were the Stanley Cup champions.

In 1930, the Montreal Canadiens were the Stanley Cup champions.

3. 1930 United States Census

Census.gov tells us that the resident population of the United States in 1930 was 122,775,046, “an increase of 13.7 percent over the 106,021,537 persons enumerated during the 1920 Census.”

City rankings:

  1. New York, New York: 6,930,446
  2. Chicago, Illinois: 3,376,438
  3. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: 1,950,961
  4. Detroit, Michigan: 1,568,662
  5. Los Angeles, California: 1,238,048
  6. Cleveland, Ohio: 900,429
  7. St. Louis, Missouri: 821,960
  8. Baltimore, Maryland: 804,874
  9. Boston, Massachusetts: 781,188
  10. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: 669,817

In 1930, the most populous states were New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Ohio, and Texas, and the least populous ones were Nevada, Wyoming, Delaware, Vermont, and New Mexico.

4. Sports Trivia

Generally suitable for all age groups, sports questions are a welcome addition to any trivia night quiz.

  1. Kentucky Derby: Gallant Fox
  2. NCAA Football Champs: Alabama & Notre Dame
  3. NFL Champions: Green Bay Packers
  4. Rose Bowl: USC over Pittsburgh
  5. Stanley Cup Champs: Montreal Canadiens
  6. U.S. Open Golf: Bobby Jones
  7. U.S. Open Tennis (men/women): John H. Doeg/Betty Nuthall
  8. Wimbledon (men/women): Bill Tilden/Helen Moody
  9. World Series Champions: Philadelphia Athletics
The 1930 Rose Bowl was the 16th Rose Bowl game, and featured the University of Pittsburgh Panthers against the USC Trojans. Southern California beat Pittsburgh, 47-14.

The 1930 Rose Bowl was the 16th Rose Bowl game, and featured the University of Pittsburgh Panthers against the USC Trojans. Southern California beat Pittsburgh, 47-14.

5. Miscellaneous Fun Facts, Trivia, and Pop Culture Trends

  1. In 1930, popular baby names were Robert, James, John, William, Mary, Betty, Dorothy, and Helen.
  2. The average life expectancy at birth in the U.S. was 58 years for men and 62 years for women.
  3. Widely-known celebrities included Joan Blondell, Clara Bow, Joan Crawford, Marlene Dietrich, Greta Garbo, Jean Harlow, Barbara Stanwyck, and Thelma Todd.
  4. Time magazine’s “Person of the Year” was Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, an Indian anti-colonial nationalist “who employed nonviolent resistance to lead the successful campaign for India's independence from British rule.”
  5. Consumer products introduced in 1930 include Breck shampoo, electric shavers, Friskies, Halls cough drops, Jiffy mixes, Kraft mayonnaise, Scotch tape, Snickers, Tums, Twinkies, and Zagnut candy bars.
  6. In 1930, the U.S. tobacco industry produced over 123 billion cigarettes.
  7. Mott’s applesauce was introduced.
  8. The first King Kullen supermarket opened in Queens, New York.
  9. The first Publix grocery store opened in Winter Haven, Florida.
  10. Farmers made up 21% of the labor force. There were about 6,295,000 farms in the United States, averaging about 157 acres apiece.
  11. About 13% of U.S. farms had electricity.
  12. Ocean Spray cranberry juice cocktail appeared on grocery store shelves for the first time.
  13. The “Dagwood” sandwich, created by Dagwood Bumstead of the comic strip Blondie, was made with “many layers of bread, meats, cheese, lettuce, tomato, condiments, etc.”
  14. In 1930, Judge Joseph Crater of the New York State Supreme Court walked out of a 45th Street restaurant in Manhattan—on his way to a show at the Belasco Theater. He mysteriously disappeared, and was never heard from again.
  15. Clarence Birdseye received a patent for his method of quick-freezing food products.
  16. Philo Farnsworth received a patent for his television system.
  17. January 13: The Mickey Mouse comic strip debuted.
  18. January 20: The western action series—The Lone Ranger—premiered on WXYZ in Detroit.
  19. February 18: Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart's musical—Simple Simon—debuted on Broadway.
  20. March 31: The Motion Pictures Production Code, also known as the Hays Code, was instituted in the United States. It imposed “strict guidelines on the treatment of sex, crime, religion, and violence in films for the next 40 years.”
  21. April 1: The Blue Angel, a film starring Marlene Dietrich in her breakthrough role, premiered in Germany.
  22. April 3: At the 2nd Academy Awards—which honored the best films of 1929—The Broadway Melody won an Oscar for Best Picture, Warner Baxter (In Old Arizona) won an Oscar for Best Actor, and Mary Pickford (Coquette) won an Oscar for Best Actress. Frank Llyod (The Divine Lady) won an Oscar for Best Director, and The Bridge of San Luis Rey won an Oscar for Best Art Direction. Finally, The Patriot won an Oscar for Best Writing, and White Shadows in the South Seas won an Oscar for Best Cinematography.
  23. April 18: BBC radio from London uniquely reported: "Good evening. Today is Good Friday. There is no news."
  24. April 21: All Quiet on the Western Front, a film that was based on the novel by Erich Maria Remarque, was released in Los Angeles.
  25. August 9: The cartoon character Betty Boop appeared for the first time in the animated film, Dizzy Dishes.
  26. August 16: The first sound cartoon to be photographed in color—Fiddlesticks—was released. Its run time was 6.12 minutes.
  27. September 8: The comic strip Blondie appeared for the first time in American newspapers.
  28. September 24: Noël Coward's play—Private Lives—premiered in London.
  29. September 29: Broadcaster and writer Lowell Thomas debuted on CBS radio.
  30. October 14: George and Ira Gershwin's musical, Girl Crazy, starring Ginger Rogers and Ethel Merman, premiered on Broadway.
  31. October 20: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes debuted on NBC radio.
  32. November 15: Jean Harlow had her first major film role in Howard Hughes' epic war film Hell's Angels.
  33. December 3: Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart's musical, Evergreen, premiered in London.
  34. December 8: The Broadway Theater officially opened at 1681 Broadway in New York City.
  35. December 23: Actress Bette Davis arrived in Hollywood to work for Universal Studios.
In 1930, Ocean Spray—”an American agricultural cooperative of growers of cranberries and grapefruit” that is headquartered in Plymouth County, Massachusetts—was established.

In 1930, Ocean Spray—”an American agricultural cooperative of growers of cranberries and grapefruit” that is headquartered in Plymouth County, Massachusetts—was established.

6. 1930's Slang Words and Phrases

During the 1930s, dozens of new slang words and expressions were added to the English language. Courtesy of Paper-Dragon.com, ThompsonSchools.org, ThoughtCatalog.com, and ScaryMommy.com, here are 100 of the era’s best slang words and phrases:

  1. All wet: No good
  2. Apple: Any big town or city
  3. Applesauce: Nonsense
  4. Babe: A woman
  5. Baloney: Nonsense
  6. Bathtub gin: Illegal alcohol that is made in back rooms and of low quality
  7. Bearcat: A lively, spirited woman
  8. Belly laugh: A loud, uninhibited laugh
  9. Bible Belt: An area in the South or Midwest where fundamentalist religion prevails
  10. Big cheese: An important person
  11. Bimbo: A macho man
  12. Blind date: A date with a person you’ve never met before
  13. Blow: To leave
  14. Blower: Telephone
  15. Bo: Pal
  16. Booze: Whiskey
  17. Broad: A woman
  18. Bronx cheer: Making a noise similar to flatulence that could signify mockery
  19. Bull session: An informal discussion
  20. Bump off: To murder
  21. Bunk: Nonsense
  22. Cake-eater: A ladies’ man
  23. Cancelled stamp: A shy, lonely female
  24. Cat’s meow: Anything or anyone that is wonderful
  25. Cement mixer: A bad dancer
  26. Cheaters: Eyeglasses
  27. Chick: A woman
  28. Chisel: To swindle or cheat
  29. Chump: A gullible person
  30. Clip joint: A night club or gambling joint where patrons get flimflammed.
  31. Cool: Very good
  32. Copacetic: Things are as they should be
  33. Crush: A romantic infatuation with a person
  34. Cute as a bug’s ear: Very attractive
  35. Dame: A woman
  36. Dope fiend: A drug addict
  37. Dumb Dora: A stupid girl
  38. Egg: A crude person
  39. Fall guy: Someone who takes the blame
  40. Fella: A man
  41. Flat tire: A dull, boring person
  42. G-man: A federal agent
  43. Gatecrasher: A person who attends a party without an invitation
  44. Gin mill: A place that serves liquor, sometimes illegally
  45. Golddigger: An attractive young woman who uses female charm to coerce money or favors from a man.
  46. Goofy: Silly
  47. Grifter: A con man or woman
  48. Grilled: To be questioned
  49. Gyp: To cheat someone out of something
  50. Hard boiled: Tough
  51. Hayburner: A car with poor gas mileage
  52. Horsefeathers: Nonsense
  53. Hot: Very good
  54. Jake: Okay, as in “Don’t worry, everything’s jake.”
  55. Jalopy: An old, busted-up car
  56. Java: Coffee
  57. Joe: An average guy
  58. Keen: Very good
  59. Kiddo: A familiar way to address another person
  60. Low down: All the information
  61. Main drag: The most important street in a town or city
  62. Micky or Micky Finn: A drink that is spiked with drugs
  63. Mrs. Grundy: An uptight or very straight-laced individual
  64. Nuts!: Crazy
  65. Okie: A migrant worker from Oklahoma
  66. Oliver Twist: An extremely good dancer
  67. On a toot: On a drinking binge
  68. Patsy: An innocent person who is framed for a criminal charge
  69. Pill: A disagreeable person
  70. Pinch: To arrest someone
  71. Pushover: A person who is easily taken advantage of
  72. Reuben: A redneck
  73. Ritzy: Elegant
  74. Sawbuck: A $10.00 bill
  75. Scram: To leave hurriedly
  76. Screwy: Crazy
  77. Scrub: A poor student
  78. Shake a leg: Hurry up
  79. Smeller: The nose
  80. Smooth: Very good
  81. Snazzy: Very good
  82. Snitch: Someone who informs the police about criminal activity
  83. Speakeasy: A bar that is disguised as something else or hidden behind an unmarked door
  84. Speakeasy: A saloon or bar that sells bootleg alcohol
  85. Spifflicated: Drunk
  86. Spiffy: Having a fashionable appearance
  87. Split: To leave
  88. Squat: Nothing
  89. Stuck on: Having a crush on
  90. Swanky: Elegant
  91. Swell: Very good
  92. Taking the rap: Taking responsibility for someone else's crime or crimes
  93. The Real McCoy: A genuine person or thing
  94. Tin: Small change
  95. To get the run-around: To be treated “evasively or misleadingly, especially in response to a request.”
  96. Tomato: A woman
  97. Twit: A fool or idiot
  98. Whacky: Crazy
  99. Whoopee: Boisterous
  100. Yo!: Yes
In 1930, Fisher-Price—a American company that manufacturers educational toys for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers—was founded.

In 1930, Fisher-Price—a American company that manufacturers educational toys for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers—was founded.

7. Nobel Prize Winners

Beth Rowen tells us that winning a Nobel Prize is a life-changing honor. Whether the laureate is an internationally known figure (such as Mother Teresa) or a scientist from obscurity (like Richard R. Ernst), the award brings worldwide recognition that highlights one's life work and provides the funds to continue the mission.

This Nobel Prize information from 1930 has been made available courtesy of NobelPrize.com.

  • Chemistry: Hans Fischer
  • Literature: Sinclair Lewis
  • Peace: Nathan Söderblom
  • Physics: C. V. Raman
  • Physiology or medicine: Karl Landsteiner

8. Best-Selling Novels

This information has been made available courtesy of Publisher’s Weekly.

  1. Cimarron by Edna Ferber
  2. Exile by Warwick Deeping
  3. The Woman of Andros by Thornton Wilder
  4. Years of Grace by Margaret Ayer Barnes
  5. Angel Pavement by J. B. Priestley
  6. The Door by Mary Roberts Rinehart
  7. Rogue Herries by Hugh Walpole
  8. Chances by A. Hamilton Gibbs
  9. Young Man of Manhattan by Katharine Brush
  10. Twenty-Four Hours by Louis Bromfield

9. 1930 in American Radio

KhanAcademy.org tells us that “After being introduced during World War I, radios became a common feature in American homes of the 1920s. Hundreds of radio stations popped up over the course of the decade. These stations developed and broadcasted news, serial stories, and political speeches. Much like in print media, advertising space was interspersed with entertainment. Yet, unlike with magazines and newspapers, advertisers did not have to depend on the active participation of consumers: Advertisers could reach out to anyone within listening distance of the radio. On the other hand, a broader audience meant advertisers had to be more conservative and careful not to offend anyone.”

Eh.net.Encyclopedia adds that "Radio broadcasting was the cheapest form of entertainment, and it provided the public with far better entertainment than most people were accustomed to. As a result, its popularity grew rapidly in the late 1920s and early 1930s, and by 1934, 60 percent of the nation’s households had radios. One and a half million cars were also equipped with them. The 1930s were the Golden Age of radio. It was so popular that theaters dared not open until after the extremely popular 'Amos ‘n Andy' show was over."

Here are some of the memorable moments from 1930 radio:

  1. January 1: The Puppy Hour, a radio show where dogs were taught to talk, premiered on NBC Blue.
  2. January 17: The variety show—Ben Bernie, the Old Maestro—debuted on NBC Blue.
  3. February 4: The American School of the Air, a public affairs supplement, premiered on CBS.
  4. March 19: The Coca-Cola Topnotchers—starring sportscaster Grantland Rice and announced by Graham McNamee—debuted on NBC-Red.
  5. April 14: Ripley’s Believe It Or Not premiered on NBC.
  6. May 12: Walter Winchell, a newspaper gossip columnist for the New York Daily Mirror, made his radio debut on CBS.
  7. June 16: Clara, Lu, ‘n Em—a radio soap opera—debuted on WGN in Chicago.
  8. September 30: The anthology series, Death Valley Days, debuted on NBC Blue.
  9. October 2: The Lutheran Hour premiered on CBS, and Dr. Walter A. Maier became the program's speaker for the next twenty years.
  10. November 27: The First Nighter Program—an anthology comedy-drama series—debuted on the Blue Network.
In 1930, at the 2nd Academy Awards, The Broadway Melody won an Oscar for Best Picture.

In 1930, at the 2nd Academy Awards, The Broadway Melody won an Oscar for Best Picture.

10. Greatest Films of 1930

This film trivia from 1930 has been made available courtesy of IMDB.com.

  1. All Quiet on the Western Front
  2. Hell’s Angels
  3. King of Jazz
  4. The Blue Angel
  5. Morocco
  6. Little Rascals: Best of Our Gang
  7. The Big Trail
  8. Animal Crackers
  9. L’Age D’Or
  10. Romance
  11. Anna Christie
  12. People on Sunday
  13. Madam Satan
  14. Murder!
  15. The Blood of a Poet
  16. The Divorcee
  17. Children of Pleasure
  18. Earth
  19. The Criminal Code
  20. The Big House
  21. Up the River
  22. The Bat Whispers
  23. Ladies of Leisure
  24. Dancing Sweeties
  25. Her Man
  26. City Girl
  27. Juno and the Paycock
  28. Paramount on Parade
  29. Abraham Lincoln
  30. Min and Bill
  31. The Dawn Patrol
  32. The Doorway to Hell
  33. Westfront 1918
  34. Journey’s End
  35. Holiday
  36. Reaching for the Moon
  37. Spring Is Here
  38. Just Imagine
  39. Whoopee!
  40. Sin Takes a Holiday
  41. Moby Dick
  42. Feet First
  43. Tom Sawyer
  44. Au Bonheur des Dames (The Ladies' Paradise)
  45. Let Us Be Gay
  46. Paid
  47. Under the Roofs of Paris
  48. The Unholy Three
  49. The Widow from Chicago
  50. Ingagi

11. Animated Films (Cartoons) Released in 1930

This film trivia from 1930 has been made available courtesy of IMDB.com.

  1. Africa
  2. Alaskan Knights
  3. Arctic Antics
  4. Autumn
  5. Barnacle Bill
  6. Box Car Blues
  7. Broadway Folly
  8. Cannibal Capers
  9. Chilly Con Carmen
  10. Circus Capers
  11. Congo Jazz
  12. Dixie Days
  13. Dizzy Dishes
  14. Fiddlesticks
  15. Frolicking Fish
  16. Good Old Schooldays
  17. Gypped in Egypt
  18. Henpecked
  19. Hold Anything
  20. Hot Dog
  21. Jazz Rhythm
  22. Just Mickey
  23. Mars
  24. Mexico
  25. Midnight in a Toy Shop
  26. Monkey Melodies
  27. Mysterious Mose
  28. Night
  29. Not So Quiet
  30. Pioneer Days
  31. Playful Pan
  32. Ritzy Hotel
  33. Sinkin' in the Bathtub
  34. Slow Beau
  35. Spooks
  36. Summer
  37. Swing You Sinners!
  38. The Bandmaster
  39. The Barnyard Concert
  40. The Booze Hangs High
  41. The Cactus Kid
  42. The Chain Gang
  43. The Fire Fighters
  44. The Navy
  45. The Picnic
  46. The Shindig
  47. The Stein Song
  48. Toby the Showman
  49. Western Whoopee
  50. Winter

12. Broadway Shows That Opened

Courtesy of BroadwayWorld.com, here are 50 Broadway shows that opened in 1930:

  1. A Farewell to Arms: 9/22/30
  2. A Month in the Country: 3/17/30
  3. A Night at an Inn: 5/9/30
  4. As Good as New: 11/3/30
  5. Babes in Toyland: 12/20/30
  6. Change Your Luck: 6/6/30
  7. Children of Darkness: 1/7/30
  8. Everything's Jake: 1/16/30
  9. Fine and Dandy: 9/23/30
  10. Frankie and Johnnie: 9/25/30
  11. Gala Night: 2/25/30
  12. Grand Hotel: 11/13/30
  13. It's A Grand Life: 2/10/30
  14. Lady Clara: 4/17/30
  15. Life is Like That: 12/22/30
  16. Live and Learn: 4/9/30
  17. London Calling: 10/18/30
  18. Meet My Sister: 12/30/30
  19. Midnight: 12/29/30
  20. Mystery Moon: 6/23/30
  21. Princess Charming: 10/13/30
  22. Seven Against One: 5/6/30
  23. Strike Up the Band: 1/14/30
  24. Sweet and Low: 11/17/30
  25. The Boundary Line: 2/5/30
  26. The Chocolate Soldier: 1/27/30
  27. The Choice: 5/8/30
  28. The Green Pastures: 2/26/30
  29. The Last Enemy: 10/30/30
  30. The Last Mile: 2/13/30
  31. The Long Road: 9/9/30
  32. The Matriarch: 3/18/30
  33. The New Freedom: 5/14/30
  34. The New Yorkers: 12/8/30
  35. The Ninth Guest: 8/25/30
  36. The Noble Experiment: 10/27/30
  37. The Old Rascal: 3/24/30
  38. The Playboy of the Western World: 1/2/30
  39. The Rhapsody: 9/15/30
  40. The Rivals: 3/13/30
  41. The Second Little Show: 9/2/30
  42. The Serenade: 3/4/30
  43. The Sisters' Tragedy: 5/5/30
  44. The Tavern: 5/19/30
  45. The Traitor: 5/2/30
  46. The Truth Game: 12/27/3
  47. The Will: 5/5/30
  48. The Wooden Idol: 5/12/30
  49. Tonight or Never: 11/18/30
  50. Torch Song: 8/27/30

13. Biggest Pop Music Artists and Groups

Popular music artists and groups from 1930 include Duke Ellington, Libby Holman, Wayne King and His Orchestra, Ted Lewis and His Band, Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians, the Regent Club Orchestra, Harry Richman, the Leo Reisman Orchestra, Jacques Renard and His Orchestra, Rudy Vallée & His Connecticut Yankees, Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians, and Paul Whiteman & His Orchestra.

14. Top 25 Songs for the Year

This music trivia from 1930 has been made available courtesy of Playback.fm.

  1. Ben Selvin: Happy Days Are Here Again
  2. Harry Richman: Puttin’ on the Ritz
  3. Ruth Etting: Ten Cents a Dance
  4. Don Azpiazú and His Havana Casino Orchestra: The Peanut Vendor
  5. Paul Whiteman: Body & Soul
  6. Duke Ellington: Three Little Words
  7. Rudy Valee and His Connecticut Yankees: Stein Song (University of Maine)
  8. Ted Lewis & His Orchestra: On the Sunny Side of the Street
  9. Roy Ingraham: Chant of the Jungle
  10. Nat Shilkret: Dancing With Tears in My Eyes
  11. Fred Waring & the Pennsylvanians: Little White Lies
  12. Guy Lombardo: You’re Driving Me Crazy (What Did I Do?)
  13. Benny Meroff & His Orchestra: Happy Days Are Here Again
  14. Jimmie Rodgers: Blue Yodel No. 9 (Standin’ on the Corner)
  15. Hilo Hawiian Orchestra: When It’s Springtime in The Rockies
  16. McKinney’s Cotton Pickers: If I Could Be With You One Hour Tonight
  17. Louis Armstrong: St. Louis Blues
  18. Mississippi Sheiks: Sitting on Top of the World
  19. Ben Selvin: When It’s Springtime in The Rockies
  20. Cannon’s Jug Stompers: Walk Right In
  21. Carmen Miranda: Pra Voce Gostar De Mim (Tahi)
  22. Van Phillips: I’m in The Market For You
  23. Son House: My Black Mama
  24. Al Jolson: Let Me Sing & I’m Happy
  25. Rudy Valee and His Connecticut Yankees: Betty Coed
In 1930, vanilla Depression cake—made with no eggs, milk, or butter—was a popular American dessert.

In 1930, vanilla Depression cake—made with no eggs, milk, or butter—was a popular American dessert.

15. Depression-Era Dining

The Great Depression (1929-41) caused widespread food shortages of meat, milk, and other pantry staples. During this economic downturn, people learned to stretch their dollars and avoid waste by eating simple meals. Encyclopedia.com tells us that “Cookbooks and radio programs offered recipes, including those for ‘poor man's cake’ (a cake made without flour) and green tomato mincemeat, a kind of relish. Instead of buying canned food, women would take the fresh produce from their own gardens and can, pickle, and preserve it. A family of six could be fed on about five dollars of groceries each week, but every penny counted.”

Here are 100 popular Depression-era foods:

  1. Baked apple pudding
  2. Baked apples
  3. Baked bean sandwiches
  4. Beans and sausage
  5. Bread and butter pickles
  6. Bread and butter sandwiches with no filling
  7. Buttermilk biscuits
  8. Buttermilk pie
  9. Cabbage and pasta
  10. Cabbage soup
  11. Carrot cake
  12. Celery and cabbage sandwiches
  13. Celery sandwiches
  14. Chicken noodle soup
  15. Chipped beef on toast
  16. Chocolate cream pie
  17. Chocolate pudding
  18. Clam chowder
  19. Cocoa cream pie
  20. Corn chowder
  21. Cornbread
  22. Corned beef fritters
  23. Corned beef salad
  24. Cornmeal dumplings
  25. Cream of celery soup
  26. Cream puffs
  27. Creamed chicken on biscuits
  28. Creamed peas on toast
  29. Cucumber and radish sandwiches
  30. Cucumber sandwiches
  31. Dandelion salad
  32. Deviled eggs
  33. Egg drop soup
  34. Egg sandwiches
  35. Fried bologna sandwiches
  36. Gelatin
  37. Graham cracker pie crust
  38. Green tomato pie
  39. Grilled cheese sandwiches
  40. Grilled sweet corn
  41. Homebread bread
  42. Homemade applesauce
  43. Homemade ice cream
  44. Homemade noodles
  45. Homemade pickles
  46. Hominy beef chili
  47. Hoover stew
  48. Hot dogs and beans
  49. Jam sandwiches
  50. Jelly sandwiches
  51. Ketchup, mayonnaise, and onion sandwiches
  52. Lemon parsley potatoes
  53. Lettuce and radish sandwiches
  54. Lettuce sandwiches
  55. Lima bean soup
  56. Macaroni and cheese
  57. Meatloaf
  58. Milkorno (Milk and corn mixed together became a "superfood” of the Depression.)
  59. Mulligan stew
  60. Navy bean soup
  61. Olive burgers
  62. Olive-stuffed celery
  63. Pancakes
  64. Pasta and peas
  65. Peanut butter and onion sandwiches
  66. Peanut butter sandwiches
  67. Pimento sandwiches
  68. Poor man’s cake without eggs or dairy
  69. Pork stew
  70. Potato casseroles
  71. Potato pancakes
  72. Potato salad
  73. Potato soup
  74. Prune pudding
  75. Red velvet cake
  76. Rice pudding
  77. Roasted cabbage and onions
  78. Sardine sandwiches
  79. Scalloped potatoes with mushrooms
  80. Skillet cabbage
  81. Spaghetti with boiled carrots and white sauce
  82. Spiced devil's food cake
  83. Spinach souffle
  84. Stewed tomatoes with bread
  85. Stuffed olive sandwiches
  86. Succotash
  87. Tapioca
  88. Three-bean baked beans
  89. Tomato and green pepper sandwiches
  90. Tomato and horseradish sandwiches
  91. Tomato and lettuce sandwiches
  92. Tomato cakes
  93. Tomato sandwiches
  94. Tomato soup
  95. Tuna salad with tomatoes
  96. Vanilla Depression cake
  97. Vegetable lentil soup
  98. Vinegar pie
  99. Wacky chocolate cake without butter or eggs
  100. Water pie (Mashed.com reveals that all that you need to make this sweet, buttery dessert is hot water, vanilla, sugar, butter, flour, and pie crust.)
In 1930, hot dogs and baked beans were all the rage.

In 1930, hot dogs and baked beans were all the rage.

16. Famous Birthdays

Here are some of the famous people who were born in 1930:

  1. Buzz Aldrin: Astronaut
  2. Clint Eastwood: Director
  3. Don Shula: Football coach
  4. Gene Hackman: Movie actor
  5. Grandma Lill: YouTube star
  6. Harvey Milk: Civil rights leader
  7. Jim Nabors (1930-2017): TV actor
  8. Joanne Woodward: Movie actress
  9. Mary Costa: Opera singer
  10. Michael Collins: Astronaut
  11. Neil Armstrong: Astronaut
  12. Princess Margaret
  13. Ray Charles: Singer
  14. Richard Harris: Movie actor
  15. Robert Wagner: Movie actor
  16. Rolf Harris: Pop singer
  17. Sandra Day O'Connor: Supreme Court Justice
  18. Sean Connery: Movie actor
  19. Shel Silverstein (1930-99): Children’s author
  20. Stephen Sondheim: Composer
  21. Steve McQueen: Movie actor
  22. Sylvia Weinstock: Chef
  23. Tim Horton: Hockey player
  24. Tippi Hedren: Movie actress
  25. Warren Buffett: Investor

17. Notable Weddings

These trivia facts have been made available courtesy of OnThisDay.com.

  1. On January 14, author John Steinbeck married Carol Henning.
  2. On January 15, businesswoman Estee Mentzer wed businessman Joseph Lauter (later Lauder).
  3. On June 5, actress Agnes Moorehead married actor Jack G. Lee.
  4. On June 21, Titanic actress Gloria Stuart wed sculptor Blair Gordon Newell.
  5. On June 23, businessman Nelson Rockefeller married Mary Todhunter Clark.
  6. On June 23, diplomat Ralph Bunche tied the knot with Ruth Harris.
  7. On June 28, film director David Lean tied the knot with his first cousin Isabel Lean.
  8. On September 4, Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall wed Vivien Burey.
  9. On September 11, mystery writer Agatha Christie married archaeologist Max Mallowan.
  10. On September 29, singer and actor Bing Crosby wed actress Dixie Lee.

18. Famous People Who Died

This information has been made available courtesy of FamousBirthdays.com.

  1. Alfred Wegener: Meteorologist
  2. Conrad Ansorge: Pianist
  3. D. H. Lawrence: Poet
  4. Dick Rauch: Football player
  5. Edward Bok: Journalist
  6. Edward Stratemeyer: Children’s author
  7. Edward Terry Sanford: Supreme Court Justice
  8. Elmer Ambrose Sperry: Entrepreneur
  9. Glenn Curtiss: Entrepreneur
  10. Henry Tureman Allen: Explorer
  11. John Thompson Dorrance: Entrepreneur
  12. Jonas Jablonskis: Linguist
  13. Leopold Auer: Violinist
  14. Linda Richards: Doctor
  15. Mabel Normand: Movie actress
  16. Oscar Borg: Composer
  17. Robert Bridges: Poet
  18. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: Novelist
  19. Stephen Mather: Entrepreneur
  20. William Howard Taft: Former President of the United States
In 1930, the auto manufacturer Studebaker  built 123,215 vehicles.

In 1930, the auto manufacturer Studebaker built 123,215 vehicles.

19. U.S. Automobile Production Figures for the Year

Here are the U.S. automobile production figures for 1930:

  1. Ford: 1,140,710
  2. Chevrolet: 640,980
  3. Buick: 181,743
  4. Studebaker: 123,215
  5. Hudson: 113,898
  6. Plymouth: 108,350
  7. Dodge: 90,755
  8. Chrysler: 77,881

20. Companies and Retailers From 1930 That Are Still in Business Today

  1. Barnes & Noble
  2. Bloomingdales
  3. Brooks Brothers
  4. Burlington Coat Factory
  5. Chevron
  6. CVS
  7. Ford Motor
  8. Hy-Vee
  9. JCPenney
  10. Lowes
  11. Macy’s
  12. Mobil
  13. Neiman Marcus
  14. Nordstrom
  15. Publix
  16. Safeway
  17. Saks Fifth Avenue
  18. Sears
  19. Shell
  20. Sherwin-Williams
  21. Target
  22. The Kroger Co.
  23. Walgreens
  24. Walt Disney Corporation
  25. Wegmans
Publix is an employee-owned supermarket chain headquartered in Lakeland, Florida. Founded in 1930 by George W. Jenkins, Publix is one of America’s largest grocery store chains, with 831 stores in Florida alone.

Publix is an employee-owned supermarket chain headquartered in Lakeland, Florida. Founded in 1930 by George W. Jenkins, Publix is one of America’s largest grocery store chains, with 831 stores in Florida alone.

References:

In 1930, macaroni and cheese was a popular Depression-era meal.

In 1930, macaroni and cheese was a popular Depression-era meal.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2021 Gregory DeVictor

Comments

Gregory DeVictor (author) from Pittsburgh, PA on May 12, 2021:

Thank you for the comment.

Lady Dazy from UK on May 11, 2021:

1930 would have been an interesting year. So much has changed since then.

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