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1935 Fun Facts and Trivia

Gregory DeVictor is a trivia enthusiast who loves to write articles on American nostalgia.

This article teaches you fun facts, trivia, and historical events from the year 1935.

This article teaches you fun facts, trivia, and historical events from the year 1935.

Why Was the Year 1935 so Special?

What are some fun facts, trivia, and historical events from the year 1935? What were the top news stories in the U.S. and around the world? What happened in the business and financial sectors, in science, technology, sports, the entertainment industry, and in everyday life? What about famous birthdays, marriages, and deaths that year?

  1. In 1935, America was in the midst of the Great Depression (August 1929 to March 1939), “the deepest and longest-lasting economic downturn in the history of the Western industrialized world up to that time.” The economy grew by 8.9%, unemployment fell to 20.1%, prices rose 3.0%, and the federal debt rose to $29 billion.
  2. President Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act into law. The Act “established old-age benefits for retirees, benefits for the jobless, as well as aid for dependent mothers and children, victims of work-related accidents, people who are blind, and those who have physical disabilities. Under the Act, the U.S. government started collecting the Social Security tax from workers in 1937 and began making payments in 1940.”
  3. President Roosevelt also signed the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) into law. Also known as the Wagner Act, the NLRA guarantees the right of employees to organize and form unions and to engage in collective bargaining.
  4. The Black Sunday dust storm displaced an estimated 300 million tons of topsoil in New Mexico, Colorado, Texas, and Oklahoma. It was one of the worst dust storms in American history, and “Drivers were forced to take refuge in their cars, while other residents hunkered down in basements, barns, fire stations, and tornado shelters, as well as under beds.” The combination of drought, dried-out topsoil, and high winds caused the dust to fly freely and at tremendous speeds.
  5. On Labor Day, the strongest hurricane ever to hit the United States made landfall in the upper Florida Keys, killing 423 and destroying the railroad to Key West.
  6. The USS Philadelphia, a gunboat that was constructed during the American Revolutionary War, was raised from Lake Champlain.
  7. The Ladby ship grave was discovered in Denmark, which was the only ship burial site ever uncovered in the country.
  8. The FBI gunned down the Barker Gang, including Ma Barker, during a shootout in Florida. The Barker-Karpis Gang was responsible for three kidnappings, 10 murders, and thefts of more than $1 million during a three-year rampage that began in 1931.
  9. On June 13, Huey Long, a U.S. Senator from Louisiana, conducted the longest one-man filibuster of his era—15½ hours and 150,000 words. On September 8, Carl Weiss assassinated Senator Long at the Louisiana Capitol Building in Baton Rouge.
  10. In 1935, Robert Watson-Watt invented radar, Dr. Wallace Hume Carothers developed nylon, and George Dempster created the Dempster-Dumpster.
  11. Mary McLeod Bethune, an educator and activist, established the National Council of Negro Women in New York City.
  12. Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)—a 12-step program that helps its members to stay sober and help other alcoholics to achieve sobriety—was founded in Akron, Ohio.
  13. Dry Tortugas National Park was established in the Florida Keys, and Shenandoah National Park was established in Virginia, just 75 miles from Washington, DC.
  14. The world's first parking meters were installed in the business district of Oklahoma City.
  15. Coopers Inc. began selling the world's first men's briefs—aka "jockeys"—in Chicago.
  16. Parker Brothers began selling the board game Monopoly in the United States.
  17. The Detroit Lions were the NFL champs, the Detroit Tigers won the World Series, and the Montreal Maroons were the Stanley Cup champions.
  18. Babe Ruth hit his 714th and final career home run at Forbes Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
  19. The first nighttime MLB game was played between the Cincinnati Reds and the Philadelphia Phillies at Crosley Field in Cincinnati, Ohio.
  20. The first Orange Bowl game was played in Miami, where Bucknell won over the University of Miami, 26-0. Likewise, the first Sugar Bowl game was played in New Orleans, where Tulane won over Temple, 20-14.
  21. At the 7th Academy Awards, It Happened One Night won five Oscars, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Adapted Screenplay.
  22. The classic Mickey Mouse cartoon, The Band Concert, was released by United Artists. It was also the first Mickey Mouse film produced in color.
  23. Consumer products introduced in 1935 include Arrid deodorant, Hostess potato chips, Hummel figurines, Kit Kat bars, nylon, paper shredders, Preparation H, Sterzing’s potato chips, and the Wonderbra.
  24. In 1935, Bob Denver, Bobby Vinton, Bruno Sammartino, Diahann Carroll, Donald Sutherland, Dudley Moore, Elvis Presley, Frank Robinson, Gary Player, Johnny Mathis, Julie Andrews, Sandy Koufax, and Woody Allen were all born.
  25. At the 11th National Spelling Bee, 13-year-old Clara Mohler of Ohio correctly spelled the word “interning.”

This article teaches you fun facts, trivia, and historical events from the year 1935. Find out about popular movies, music, books, foods, sports facts, famous birthdays, and other cool pop culture trends to get the right mix of questions and answers for your 1930s-themed trivia game.

In 1935, Tyson Foods—the world's second largest processor of chicken, beef, and pork—was founded by John W. Tyson. Located in Springdale, Arkansas, Tyson also operates a number of major food brands, including Jimmy Dean and Hillshire Farms.

In 1935, Tyson Foods—the world's second largest processor of chicken, beef, and pork—was founded by John W. Tyson. Located in Springdale, Arkansas, Tyson also operates a number of major food brands, including Jimmy Dean and Hillshire Farms.

Table of Contents

For easier reading and referencing, I have divided this article into the following categories:

  1. Grocery Prices in the Year 1935
  2. History Facts From the USA and World
  3. Sports Trivia
  4. Miscellaneous Fun Facts, Trivia, and Pop Culture Trends
  5. 1930's Slang Words and Phrases
  6. Nobel Prize Winners
  7. Best-Selling Fiction and Nonfiction Books
  8. 1935 in American Radio
  9. Greatest Films of 1935
  10. Ten Best Horror Movies of the Year
  11. 50 Broadway Shows That Opened
  12. Biggest Pop Music Artists and Groups
  13. Top 40 Songs for the Year
  14. 100 Popular Food Brands From 1935
  15. Depression-Era Dining
  16. Famous Birthdays
  17. Notable Weddings
  18. Famous People Who Died
  19. U.S. Automobile Production Figures for the Year
  20. American Companies and Brands Established During 1935
In 1935, bacon was 41 cents a pound, eggs were 37 cents a dozen, and a loaf of bread cost five cents. Pork and beans were five cents a can, milk was 23 cents for a half gallon, and chuck roast cost 15 cents a pound.

In 1935, bacon was 41 cents a pound, eggs were 37 cents a dozen, and a loaf of bread cost five cents. Pork and beans were five cents a can, milk was 23 cents for a half gallon, and chuck roast cost 15 cents a pound.

1. Grocery Prices in the Year 1935

These grocery facts have been made available courtesy of the Morris County Public Library in Whippany, NJ. and from OnCourseSystems.com.

Remember, $1.00 in 1935 is worth about $19.44 today.

  1. Bacon: 41 cents a pound
  2. Applesauce: Three cans for 20 cents
  3. Baked ham: 39 cents a pound
  4. Bananas: Four pounds for 19 cents
  5. Beef (ground): Two pounds for 25 cents
  6. Bread: Five cents for a 16-ounce loaf
  7. Butter: 40 cents a pound
  8. Cabbage: Three cents a pound
  9. Camay soap: Six cents a bar
  10. Campbell’s tomato soup: Four cans for 25 cents
  11. Chuck roast: 15 cents a pound
  12. Coffee: 25 cents a pound
  13. Dole pineapple juice: Two cans for 25 cents
  14. Duck: 24 cents a pound
  15. Eggs: 37 cents a dozen
  16. Flour: Five pounds for 25 cents
  17. Grapefruit: Three for 10 cents
  18. Hot dogs: Eight cents a pound
  19. Iceberg lettuce: Seven cents a head
  20. Jelly (Ideal brand): 27 cents for a 32-ounce jar
  21. Ketchup: Nine cents a bottle
  22. Lamb: 17 cents a pound
  23. Lux laundry soap: 22 cents a box
  24. Macaroni or spaghetti: (Mueller’s): Three 16-ounce boxes for 25 cents
  25. Milk: 23 cents for a half gallon
  26. Onions: Five pounds for 19 cents
  27. Oranges: 22 cents a dozen
  28. Peanut butter: 23 cents a jar
  29. Peas: Four cents a pound
  30. Pork and beans: Five cents a can
  31. Pork roast: 12 cents a pound
  32. Potatoes: 10 pounds for 19 cents
  33. Round steak: 36 cents a pound
  34. Spinach: Five cents a pound
  35. Sugar: Five pounds for 28 cents
  36. Toilet tissue: Two rolls for nine cents
  37. Toothpaste: 27 cents a tube
  38. Turkey: 32 cents a pound
  39. Wisconsin cheese: 23 cents a pound
In 1935, Babe Ruth hit his 714th and final career home run at Forbes Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

In 1935, Babe Ruth hit his 714th and final career home run at Forbes Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

2. History Facts From the USA and World

  1. Franklin D. Roosevelt (D-New York) was president of the United States, and John Nance Garner (D-Texas) was the vice-president.
  2. Charles Evans Hughes (New York) was the chief justice of the United States Supreme Court.
  3. Joseph W. Byrns, Sr. (D-Tennessee) was the speaker of the House of Representatives.
  4. Joseph Taylor Robinson (D-Arkansas) was the Senate majority leader.
  5. The 73rd Congress was in session until January 3, and the 74th Congress began on January 3.
  6. In 1935, America was in the midst of the Great Depression (August 1929 to March 1939), “the deepest and longest-lasting economic downturn in the history of the Western industrialized world up to that time.” The economy grew by 8.9%, unemployment fell to 20.1%, prices rose 3.0%, and the federal debt rose to $29 billion.
  7. $1.00 in 1935 is worth about $19.44 today.
  8. January 3: The trial of Richard Hauptmann—who was accused of the kidnapping and murder of Charles Lindbergh Jr.—began in Flemington, New Jersey.
  9. January 4: Dry Tortugas National Park was established in the Florida Keys.
  10. January 11: Amelia Earhart became the first person to fly solo from Hawaii to California.
  11. January 16: The FBI gunned down the Barker Gang, including Ma Barker, during a shootout in Florida. The Barker-Karpis Gang was responsible for three kidnappings, 10 murders, and thefts of more than $1 million during a three-year rampage—primarily in the Midwest—that began in 1931. Wikipedia.org tells us that “The gang was founded by Fred Barker and Alvin Karpis, and later joined by Fred's brother Arthur 'Doc' Barker.”
  12. January 19: Coopers Inc. began selling the world's first men's briefs—aka "jockeys"—in Chicago.
  13. January 21: The Wilderness Society, a conservation group, was founded in Washington, DC. EnvironmentAndSociety.org tells us that the Wilderness Society “has dedicated its efforts to the protection of American public lands, including national parks, game reserves, and all areas maintained by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management.”
  14. February 13: Richard Hauptmann was convicted and sentenced to death for the kidnapping and murder of Charles Lindbergh Jr.
  15. February 22: Airplanes were banned from flying over the White House.
  16. February 26: The Soil Conservation & Domestic Allotment Act began paying farmers to plant soil-building crops.
  17. February 26: Robert Watson-Watt, a Scottish physicist, invented RADAR (Radio Detection and Ranging). He had been looking for a reliable way to help airmen locate and avoid approaching thunderstorms.
  18. February 26: Baseball legend Babe Ruth signed with the Boston Braves.
  19. February 28: The Ladby ship grave was discovered in Denmark, which was the only ship burial site ever uncovered in the country. Berloga-Workshop.com reports that the Ladby burial site is similar to ones found in Oseberg, Borre, Gokstad, and Tune in South Norway, all of which date back to the 9th and 10th centuries.
  20. March 19: A race riot broke out in Harlem—the historic center of black culture in New York City—after a rumor began circulating that a teenage Puerto Rican shoplifter had been brutally beaten by employees in the S. H. Kress five-and-dime store.
  21. The Black Sunday dust storm displaced an estimated 300 million tons of topsoil in New Mexico, Colorado, Texas, and Oklahoma. It was one of the worst dust storms in American history, and “Drivers were forced to take refuge in their cars, while other residents hunkered down in basements, barns, fire stations, and tornado shelters, as well as under beds.” The combination of drought, dried-out topsoil, and high winds caused the dust to fly freely and at tremendous speeds.
  22. On April 15, John A. Kelley won the 39th Boston Marathon.
  23. April 30: The Resettlement Administration began providing loans to farmers.
  24. May 6: President Roosevelt signed an executive order that created the Works Progress Administration (WPA). History.com explains that the WPA, the Public Works Administration (PWA), and other federal assistance programs “put unemployed Americans to work in return for temporary financial assistance. Out of the 10 million jobless men in the United States in 1935, three million were helped by WPA jobs alone.”
  25. On May 19, English Cardinal John Fisher and statesman Thomas More, executed by Henry VIII, were canonized by Pope Pius XI.
  26. May 20: The Rural Electrification Act began helping farms to generate electricity.
  27. May 24: The first nighttime MLB game was played between the Cincinnati Reds and the Philadelphia Phillies at Crosley Field in Cincinnati, Ohio.
  28. May 5: Babe Ruth hit his 714th and final career home run at Forbes Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
  29. May 27: In Schechter Poultry Corporation v. United States, the Supreme Court ruled that the National Industrial Recovery Act, a major component of President Roosevelt’s New Deal, was unconstitutional.
  30. May 30: Babe Ruth appeared in his last career game, playing for the Boston Braves in Philadelphia against the Phillies.
  31. June 26: The National Youth Administration—a New Deal agency that focused on providing work and education for Americans between the ages of 16 and 25—was established.
  32. June 10: Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)—a 12-step program that helps its members to stay sober and help other alcoholics to achieve sobriety—was founded in Akron, Ohio. AA paved the way for other 12-step groups, including Narcotics Anonymous (NA), Debtors Anonymous (DA), and Food Addicts Anonymous (FAA).
  33. June 13: Senator Huey Long of Louisiana, who was at odds with President Roosevelt’s New Deal, ended his epic filibuster—15½ hours and 150,000 words. Long’s goal had been to “require Senate confirmation of the National Recovery Administration's senior employees, and to prevent his political enemies in Louisiana from obtaining cushy NRA jobs.”
  34. June 28: President Roosevelt suggested that a federal gold vault should be built at Fort Knox, Kentucky.
  35. July 5: President Roosevelt signed the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) into law. Also known as the Wagner Act, the NLRA guarantees the right of employees to organize and form unions and to engage in collective bargaining.
  36. July 16: The world's first parking meters were installed in the business district of Oklahoma City.
  37. July 24: The Dust Bowl heat wave reached its peak, sending temperatures in Chicago to a record high of 109°F.
  38. July 27: The Federal Writers' Project—a federal program created to provide jobs for out-of-work writers during the Great Depression—was established.
  39. August 2: The USS Philadelphia, a gunboat that was constructed during the American Revolutionary War, was raised from Lake Champlain.
  40. August 5: The Leo Burnett Advertising Agency opened in Chicago, Illinois.
  41. August 14: President Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act into law. The Act “established old-age benefits for retirees, benefits for the jobless, as well as aid for dependent mothers and children, victims of work-related accidents, people who are blind, and those who have physical disabilities. Under the Act, the U.S. government started collecting the Social Security tax from workers in 1937 and began making payments in 1940.”
  42. September 2: On Labor Day, the strongest hurricane ever to hit the United States made landfall in the upper Florida Keys, killing 423 and destroying the railroad to Key West. It was rated as a Category 5 storm with winds of up to 200 mph.
  43. September 8: Carl Weiss fatally wounded Huey Long, a U.S. Senator from Louisiana, at the Louisiana Capitol Building in Baton Rouge.
  44. September 24: Earl W. Bascom and his brother Weldon produced the first rodeo that was held outdoors at night under electric lights.
  45. September 30: U.S. President Roosevelt dedicated the Hoover Dam in Nevada.
  46. October 6: The Market Street Railway in San Francisco began using trackless trolleys.
  47. October 7: The Detroit Tigers defeated the Chicago Cubs, four games to two, to win their first World Series.
  48. November 22: The aircraft China Clipper took off from Alameda, California to deliver 110,000 pieces of mail to Manilla, the Philippines.
  49. December 5: Mary McLeod Bethune established the National Council of Negro Women.
  50. December 26: Shenandoah National Park was established in Virginia, just 75 miles from the hustle and bustle of Washington, DC.
In 1935, the Detroit Lions were the NFL champions.

In 1935, the Detroit Lions were the NFL champions.

3. Sports Trivia

Generally suitable for all age groups, sports questions are a welcome addition to any trivia night quiz.

  1. Kentucky Derby: Omaha
  2. NCAA Football Champs: Minnesota & SMU
  3. NFL Champions: Detroit Lions
  4. Orange Bowl: Bucknell over Miami
  5. Rose Bowl: Alabama over Stanford
  6. Stanley Cup Champs: Montreal Maroons
  7. Sugar Bowl: Tulane over Temple
  8. U.S. Open Golf: Sam Parks Jr.
  9. U.S. Open Tennis (men/women): Wilmer L. Allison/Helen H. Jacobs
  10. Wimbledon (men/women): Fred Perry/Helen Moody
  11. World Series Champions: Detroit Tigers
In 1935, the Montreal Maroons were the Stanley Cup champs.

In 1935, the Montreal Maroons were the Stanley Cup champs.

4. Miscellaneous Fun Facts, Trivia, and Pop Culture Trends

  1. In 1935, popular baby names were Robert, James, John, William, Mary, Shirley, Barbara, and Betty.
  2. The average life expectancy at birth in the U.S. was 59.9 years for men and 63.9 years for women.
  3. Fashion icons for the year included Joan Blondell, Claudette Colbert, Joan Crawford, Olivia de Havilland, Marlene Dietrich, Jean Harlow, Katharine Hepburn, Hedy Lamarr, Dolores Del Rio, Ginger Rogers, Barbara Stanwyck, and Mae West.
  4. Henrietta Leaver of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania became Miss America.
  5. Time magazine’s “Person of the Year” was Haile Selassie I, the Emperor of Ethiopia from 1930 to 1974.
  6. Consumer products introduced in 1935 include Arrid deodorant, Hostess potato chips, Hummel figurines, Kit Kat bars, nylon, paper shredders, Preparation H, Sterzing’s potato chips, and the Wonderbra.
  7. The first beer in a can was sold in Richmond, Virginia by the Krueger Brewing Company.
  8. February 6: Parker Brothers began selling the board game Monopoly in the United States.
  9. February 22: The Little Colonel—a film starring Shirley Temple, Lionel Barrymore, and Bill Robinson—premiered. It featured the famous “stair dance” with Hollywood's first interracial dance couple, Shirley Temple and Bill Robinson.
  10. February 23: The classic Mickey Mouse cartoon, The Band Concert, was released by United Artists. It was also the first Mickey Mouse film produced in color.
  11. February 27: At the seventh Academy Awards—which honored the best films of 1934—It Happened One Night won an Oscar for Best Picture, Clark Gable (It Happened One Night) won an Oscar for Best Actor, and Claudette Colbert (It Happened One Night) won an Oscar for Best Actress. Frank Capra (It Happened One Night) won an Oscar for Best Director, and Manhattan Melodrama won an Oscar for Best Original Story. Finally, Eskimo won an Oscar for Best Film Editing, Cleopatra won an Oscar for Best Cinematography, and The Merry Widow won an Oscar for Best Art Direction.
  12. March 9: Porky Pig made his debut as a major Looney Tunes cartoon character in the short film I Haven't Got a Hat. Porky went on to become the trademark of Warner Bros.' cartoons.
  13. April 16: The comedy series, Fibber McGee and Molly, debuted on NBC radio.
  14. July 20: The drama Gang Busters debuted on NBC radio. It was regarded as "the only national program that brings you authentic police case histories."
  15. August 15: AirAndSpace.si.edu reports that “On August 15, 1935, in a plane crash near Point Barrow Alaska, famed aviator Wiley Post perished alongside his close friend, the renowned humorist and popular culture icon Will Rogers.” (Pop-Culture.us adds that “The only airport in America's northernmost city, Barrow, AK, is named after comedian Will Rogers, who died in a plane crash there in 1935. Most of the year, you need to fly to Barrow because no roads lead there and ice blocks sea access.”)
  16. September 6: Steamboat Round the Bend, a film directed by John Ford and starring Will Rogers, was released.
  17. September 24: Earl W. Bascom and his brother Weldon produced the first rodeo that was held outdoors at night under electric lights.
  18. September 30: George Gershwin’s opera, Porgy and Bess, opened in Boston.
  19. October 10: George Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess opened in New York.
  20. October 12: Cole Porter’s musical, Jubilee, debuted on Broadway.
  21. On November 8, Mutiny on the Bounty, directed by Frank Lloyd and starring Charles Laughton and Clark Gable, premiered in New York.
  22. November 15: The comedy film, A Night at the Opera—starring the Marx Brothers—was released. It was the first of five films the Marx Brothers made under contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer after their departure from Paramount Pictures.
  23. November 16: Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart's musical, Jumbo, debuted on Broadway.
  24. November 30: The British-made film Scrooge—the first all-talking film version of Charles Dickens' classic A Christmas Carol—opened in the U.S. after its British release.
  25. In 1935, there were about 6.8 million farms in the U.S.
  26. Two farmers out of every five were tenant farmers.
  27. The first Orange Bowl was played in Miami in 1935. Bucknell University won over the University of Miami, 26-0.
  28. The first Sugar Bowl game was played in New Orleans in 1935. Tulane won over Temple, 20-14.
  29. Dr. Wallace Hume Carothers, a chemist with the DuPont Corporation, invented nylon.
  30. George Dempster, an American businessman and inventor, created the Dempster-Dumpster, “a now-commonly-used trash receptacle that can be mechanically emptied into garbage trucks.”
In 1935, Hummel porcelain figurines—based on the paintings of Sister Maria Innocentia Hummel, a German Franciscan nun—were being sold for the first time at American retailers like Marshall Field & Co. of Chicago.

In 1935, Hummel porcelain figurines—based on the paintings of Sister Maria Innocentia Hummel, a German Franciscan nun—were being sold for the first time at American retailers like Marshall Field & Co. of Chicago.

5. 1930's Slang Words and Phrases

During the 1930s, dozens of new slang words and expressions were added to the English language. Courtesy of Paper-Dragon.com, here are 50 of the era’s best slang words and phrases:

  1. Abyssinia: I’ll be seeing you.
  2. Snazzy, hot, smooth, sweet, swell, and cool: Very good
  3. All wet: No good
  4. Apple: Any big town or city
  5. Babe, broad, and dame: Refers to a woman
  6. Booze: Whiskey
  7. Hot mama: An attractive woman
  8. Booshwash: To talk about nothing useful
  9. Cats: Fans of swing music
  10. Cave: One’s house or apartment
  11. Chisel: To swindle
  12. Clip joint: A night club or gambling joint where patrons get flimflammed.
  13. Cute as a bug’s ear: Very attractive
  14. Cement mixer: A bad dancer
  15. Egg: A crude person
  16. Five spot: A $5.00 bill
  17. Gin mill: A place that serves liquor, sometimes illegally
  18. G-man: A federal agent
  19. Golddigger: An attractive young woman who is actively hunting for a rich man.
  20. Greaseball and jelly bean: An unpopular person
  21. Grifter: A con man or woman
  22. Hard boiled: Tough
  23. Hop, romp, and wingding: A dance or party
  24. Joe: An average guy
  25. Juicy: Enjoyable
  26. Keen: Very good
  27. Low down: All the information
  28. Micky or Micky Finn: A drink that is spiked with drugs
  29. Nuts!: Telling someone that they are full of nonsense
  30. Okie: A migrant worker from Oklahoma
  31. Off the cob: Corny
  32. Patsy: An innocent man who is framed for a criminal charge
  33. Pill: A disagreeable person
  34. Pip: An attractive person
  35. Ring-a-ding-ding: Good time at a party
  36. Bathtub gin: Illegal alcohol that is made in back rooms and of low quality
  37. Sawbuck: A $10.00 bill
  38. Scrub: A poor student
  39. Shake a leg: Hurry up
  40. Sourdough: Counterfeit money
  41. Speakeasy: A bar that is disguised as something else or hidden behind an unmarked door
  42. Squat: Nothing
  43. Snitch: Someone who informs the police
  44. Blow, split, and scram: Leave
  45. Taking the rap: Taking responsibility for someone else's crime or crimes
  46. Tin: Small change
  47. Twit: A fool or idiot
  48. Whacky: Crazy
  49. Yo!: Yes
  50. You and me both: I agree
In 1935, the classic Mickey Mouse cartoon, The Band Concert, was released by United Artists. It was also the first Mickey Mouse film produced in color.

In 1935, the classic Mickey Mouse cartoon, The Band Concert, was released by United Artists. It was also the first Mickey Mouse film produced in color.

6. Nobel Prize Winners

Beth Rowen tells us that winning a Nobel Prize is a life-changing honor. Whether the laureate is an internationally known figure (such as Mother Teresa) or a scientist from obscurity (like Richard R. Ernst), the award brings worldwide recognition that highlights one's life work and provides the funds to continue the mission.

This Nobel Prize information from 1935 has been made available courtesy of NobelPrize.com.

  • Chemistry: Frédéric Joliot-Curie and Irène Joliot-Curie
  • Peace: Carl von Ossietzky
  • Physics: James Chadwick
  • Physiology or medicine: Hans Spemann

7. Best-Selling Fiction and Nonfiction Books

This information has been made available courtesy of Publisher’s Weekly.

Fiction books:

1. Green Light by Lloyd C. Douglas

2. Vein of Iron by Ellen Glasgow

3. Of Time and the River by Thomas Wolfe

4. Time Out of Mind by Rachel Field

5. Good-Bye, Mr. Chips by James Hilton

6. The Forty Days of Musa Dagh by Franz Werfel

7. Heaven's My Destination by Thornton Wilder

8. Lost Horizon by James Hilton

9. Come and Get It by Edna Ferber

10. Europa by Robert Briffault

Nonfiction books:

1. North to the Orient by Anne Morrow Lindbergh

2. While Rome Burns by Alexander Woollcott

3. Life with Father by Clarence Day

4. Personal History by Vincent Sheean

Recommended for You

5. The Seven Pillars of Wisdom by T. E. Lawrence

6. Francis the First by Francis Hackett

7. Mary Queen of Scotland and the Isles by Stefan Zweig

8. Rats, Lice and History by Hans Zinsser

9. R. E. Lee by Douglas Southall Freeman

10. Skin Deep by M. C. Phillips

In 1935, Parker Brothers began selling the board game Monopoly in the United States.

In 1935, Parker Brothers began selling the board game Monopoly in the United States.

8. 1935 in American Radio

KhanAcademy.org tells us that “After being introduced during World War I, radios became a common feature in American homes of the 1920s. Hundreds of radio stations popped up over the course of the decade. These stations developed and broadcasted news, serial stories, and political speeches. Much like in print media, advertising space was interspersed with entertainment. Yet, unlike with magazines and newspapers, advertisers did not have to depend on the active participation of consumers: Advertisers could reach out to anyone within listening distance of the radio. On the other hand, a broader audience meant advertisers had to be more conservative and careful not to offend anyone.”

Eh.net.Encyclopedia adds that "Radio broadcasting was the cheapest form of entertainment, and it provided the public with far better entertainment than most people were accustomed to. As a result, its popularity grew rapidly in the late 1920s and early 1930s, and by 1934, 60 percent of the nation’s households had radios. One and a half million cars were also equipped with them. The 1930s were the Golden Age of radio. It was so popular that theaters dared not open until after the extremely popular 'Amos ‘n Andy' show was over."

Here are some of the memorable events from 1935 radio:

  1. January 1: The Story of Mary Marlin premiered on NBC.
  2. January 4: Bob Hope had his network radio debut on the variety show The Intimate Revue.
  3. January 4: The Beatrice Lillie Show premiered on NBC.
  4. February 4: Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch debuted on CBS.
  5. April 17: The serial drama—House of Glass—premiered on the Blue Network.
  6. April 20: The music program, Your Hit Parade, debuted on NBC.
  7. April 27: Flash Gordon—a popular comic strip—premiered as a radio serial on the Mutual Broadcasting System.
  8. May 30: The public affairs broadcast, America's Town Meeting of the Air, debuted on the Blue Network.
  9. June 30: Uncle Charlie's Tent Show premiered on NBC. It was the first musical comedy series on the radio.
  10. July 14: America's Hour debuted on CBS.
  11. August 5: The soap opera, Backstage Wife, premiered on the Mutual Broadcasting System.
  12. October 9: The anthology drama series—Cavalcade of America—debuted on CBS.
  13. October 29: The Jumbo Fire Chief Program, starring Jimmy Durante, premiered on NBC.
  14. December 5: Bing Crosby became the guest host of the Kraft Music Hall. (In January, he became the full-time host.)
  15. December 5: The variety talk program, The Jack Berch Show, debuted on the Blue Network.
The Bride of Frankenstein—a 1935 science fiction horror film starring Boris Karloff as the Monster—was the first sequel to the 1931 film Frankenstein.

The Bride of Frankenstein—a 1935 science fiction horror film starring Boris Karloff as the Monster—was the first sequel to the 1931 film Frankenstein.

9. Greatest Films of 1935

This film trivia from 1935 has been made available courtesy of IMDB.com.

  1. The Bride of Frankenstein
  2. The 39 Steps
  3. Mutiny on the Bounty
  4. Top Hat
  5. Ruggles of Red Gap
  6. Captain Blood
  7. Les Misérables
  8. Gold Diggers of 1935
  9. The Informer
  10. David Copperfield
  11. The Lives of a Bengal Lancer
  12. Dangerous
  13. ‘G’ Men
  14. Roberta
  15. Peter Ibbetson
  16. Alice Adams
  17. A Midsummer Night's Dream
  18. Naughty Marietta
  19. The Gay Deception
  20. Broadway Melody of 1936
  21. The Dark Angel
  22. Thanks a Million
  23. Folies Bergère de Paris
  24. Barbary Coast
  25. Love Me Forever
  26. The Crusades
  27. Private Worlds
  28. Black Fury
  29. 1,000 Dollars a Minute
  30. The Scoundrel
  31. She
  32. King of Burlesque
  33. Go Into Your Dance
  34. The Big Broadcast of 1936
  35. All the King’s Horses
  36. Becky Sharp
  37. Escape Me Never
  38. I Dream Too Much
  39. Broadway Hostess

10. Ten Best Horror Movies of the Year

This film trivia from 1935 has been made available courtesy of IMDB.com.

  1. The Bride of Frankenstein
  2. Mad Love
  3. The Raven
  4. The Black Room
  5. The Ghost Goes West
  6. Charlie Chan in Egypt
  7. Werewolf of London
  8. Mark of the Vampire
  9. Mystery of Edwin Drood
  10. Phantom Ship

11. 50 Broadway Shows That Opened

Courtesy of BroadwayWorld.com, here are 50 Broadway shows that opened in 1935:

  1. A Journey By Night: 4/16/35
  2. A Lady Detained: 1/9/35
  3. A Slight Case of Murder: 9/11/35
  4. A Touch of Brimstone: 9/22/35
  5. Blind Alley: 9/24/35
  6. Boy Meets Girl: 11/27/35
  7. Bright Star: 10/15/35
  8. Camille: 12/4/35
  9. Crime Marches On: 10/23/35
  10. Dead End: 10/28/35
  11. Few Are Chosen: 9/17/35
  12. First Lady: 11/26/35
  13. Flowers of the Forest: 4/8/35
  14. Ghosts: 12/12/35
  15. Hell Freezes Over: 12/28/35
  16. How Beautiful With Shoes: 11/28/35
  17. Jubilee: 10/12/35
  18. Knock on Wood: 5/28/35
  19. Lady of Letters: 3/28/35
  20. Life's Too Short: 9/20/35
  21. Living Dangerously: 1/12/35
  22. Mansion on the Hudson: 4/2/35
  23. Moon Over Mulberry Street: 9/4/35
  24. Mother: 11/19/35
  25. Night In the House: 11/7/35
  26. Noah: 2/13/35
  27. One Good Year: 11/27/35
  28. Panic: 3/14/35
  29. Parade: 5/20/35
  30. Paths of Glory: 9/26/35
  31. Prisoners of War: 1/28/35
  32. Public Gardens: 3/20/35
  33. Remember the Day: 9/25/35
  34. Sailor, Beware!: 5/3/35
  35. Squaring the Circle: 10/3/35
  36. Stick-in-the-Mud: 11/26/35
  37. Substitute For Murder: 10/22/35
  38. Sweet Mystery of Life: 10/11/35
  39. Tapestry in Gray: 12/27/35
  40. The Distant Shore: 2/21/35
  41. The Emperor's New Clothes: 6/2/35
  42. The Great Waltz: 8/5/35
  43. The Green Pastures: 2/26/35
  44. The Old Maid: 1/7/35
  45. The Petrified Forest: 1/7/35
  46. The Ragged Edge: 11/25/35
  47. The Season Changes: 12/23/35
  48. Till the Day I Die: 3/26/35
  49. Tomorrow's a Holiday: 12/30/35
  50. Weather Permitting: 5/23/35

12. Biggest Pop Music Artists and Groups

Popular music artists and groups from 1935 include Fred Astaire, Bing Crosby, Xavier Cugat and His Waldorf-Astoria Orchestra, Tommy Dorsey and His Orchestra, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman and His Orchestra, Billie Holiday, Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians, Ray Noble and His Orchestra, Freddy Martin and His Orchestra, Ozzie Nelson and His Orchestra, Joe Venuti and His Orchestra, Fats Waller, Teddy Wilson & His Orchestra, and Victor Young & His Orchestra.

13. Top 40 Songs for the Year

This music trivia from 1935 has been made available courtesy of Playback.fm.

  1. Fred Astaire: Cheek to Cheek
  2. The Carter Family: Can the Circle be Unbroken (Bye & Bye)
  3. Eddy Duchin: Lovely to Look At
  4. Shirley Temple: On the Good Ship Lollipop
  5. Ray Noble: Isle of Capri
  6. Bing Crosby: Silent Night, Holy Night
  7. Cole Porter: You’re the Top
  8. Patsy Montana & The Prairie Ramblers: I Want to Be a Cowboy's Sweetheart
  9. Fred Astaire: Top Hat, White Tie & Tails
  10. Bing Crosby: Red Sails in the Sunset
  11. The Dorsey Brothers: Lullaby of Broadway
  12. Glen Gray: Blue Moon
  13. Carlos Gardel: El Dia Que Me Quieras
  14. Guy Lombardo: Red Sails in the Sunset
  15. Fats Waller: Truckin’
  16. Benny Goodman: King Porter Stomp
  17. Victor Young: She’s a Latin From Manhattan
  18. Bing Crosby and His Orchestra: In a Little Gypsy’s Tea Room
  19. Bing Crosby: It’s Easy to Remember
  20. Louis Armstrong: I’m in the Mood For Love
  21. Jimmie Lunceford: Rhythm Is Our Business
  22. Little Jack Little: I’m in the Mood For Love
  23. Nelson Eddy: Ah! Sweet Mystery of Life
  24. The Dorsey Brothers: Chasing Shadows
  25. Ozzie Nelson and His Orchestra: And Then Some
  26. Eddie Duchin: You Are My Lucky Star
  27. Glenn Gray: When I Grow Too Old to Dream
  28. Bing Crosby: Soon
  29. Dick Jurgens and His Orchestra: Lullaby of Broadway
  30. Guy Lombardo: What's The Reason (I'm Not Pleasin' You)
  31. Silvio Caldas: Minha Palhoça
  32. George Formby: Fanlight Fanny
  33. Xavier Cugat: The Lady in Red
  34. Eddie Duchin: I Won’t Dance
  35. The Boswell Sisters: The Object Of My Affection
  36. Leo Reisman: It Ain’t Necessarily So
  37. Richard Himber and His Orchestra: Just One of Those Things
  38. Duke Ellington: In a Sentimental Mood
  39. Eddie Duchin: Cheek to Cheek
  40. Fats Waller: A Little Bit Independent
In 1935, rice pudding was a favorite Depression-era dessert.

In 1935, rice pudding was a favorite Depression-era dessert.

14. 100 Popular Food Brands From 1935

Here are 100 popular American food brands from 1935:

  1. Arm & Hammer baking soda
  2. Armour Star canned ham
  3. Baby Ruth bars
  4. Bell's poultry seasoning
  5. Bond bread
  6. Brookfield butter
  7. Burnett's vanilla extract
  8. Butterfingers bars
  9. Campbell's canned soups (asparagus, bean, beef, bouillon, celery, chicken, chicken gumbo, clam chowder, consomme, julienne, mock turtle, mulligatawny, mutton, oxtail, pea, pepper pot, printanier, tomato, okra, vegetable, vegetable beef, and vermicelli tomato)
  10. Canada Dry pale ginger ale
  11. Carnation canned milk
  12. Chase and Sanborn coffee
  13. Coca-Cola
  14. Coleman's mustard
  15. Comet brown rice
  16. Cream of Wheat
  17. Crisco
  18. Del Monte canned Foods (apricots, berries, cherries, figs, fresh prunes, fruit salad, grapefruit, peaches, pears, pineapple, plums, asparagus, beets, corn, peas, pimientos, pumpkin, spinach, string beans, tomatoes, and tomato juice)
  19. Diamond walnuts
  20. Eagle Brand sweetened condensed milk
  21. Farwell & Rhines genuine graham flour
  22. French's mustard
  23. Gerber's baby food
  24. Gold Medal flour (regular, pancake, and cake)
  25. Heath bars
  26. Heinz bean soup
  27. Heinz beef broth
  28. Heinz beefsteak sauce
  29. Heinz catsup
  30. Heinz chili sauce
  31. Heinz clam chowder
  32. Heinz consommé
  33. Heinz cream of asparagus soup
  34. Heinz cream of celery soup
  35. Heinz cream of green pea soup
  36. Heinz cream of mushroom soup
  37. Heinz cream of oyster soup
  38. Heinz cream of tomato soup
  39. Heinz dill relish
  40. Heinz distilled white vinegar
  41. Heinz gravy
  42. Heinz horseradish
  43. Heinz mayonnaise
  44. Heinz mince meat
  45. Heinz noodle soup
  46. Heinz onion soup
  47. Heinz oven-baked beans: pork and tomato sauce
  48. Heinz oven-baked beans: pork no tomato sauce
  49. Heinz oven-baked beans: tomato sauce no pork
  50. Heinz oven-baked red kidney beans
  51. Heinz pepper pot soup
  52. Heinz prepared mustard (brown or yellow)
  53. Heinz rice flakes
  54. Heinz sandwich spread
  55. Heinz Scotch broth
  56. Heinz Spanish queen olives
  57. Heinz strained foods
  58. Heinz stuffed Spanish olives
  59. Heinz sweet dill pickles
  60. Heinz tomato juice
  61. Heinz tomato ketchup
  62. Heinz vegetable soup
  63. Heinz Worcestershire sauce
  64. Hershey bars
  65. Hip-O-Lite whipped creme
  66. Jones Dairy Farm sausage
  67. Junket (box dessert)
  68. Knox gelatin
  69. Kraft mayonnaise
  70. Lea & Perrins worcestershire sauce
  71. Libby's peaches
  72. Lifesavers
  73. Marshmallow Fluff
  74. Maxwell House coffee
  75. Milk Duds
  76. Milky Ways bars
  77. Minute tapioca
  78. Morton's iodized salt
  79. Mounds bars
  80. Ovaltine
  81. Pet milk
  82. Pillsbury's pancake flour
  83. Postum (milk supplement for children)
  84. Quaker puffed rice
  85. Quaker puffed wheat
  86. Richardson & Robbins (R&R) chicken broth
  87. Roman Meal flour
  88. Royal baking powder
  89. Sanka decaffeinated coffee
  90. Scott paper towels
  91. Seaside lima beans
  92. Sheffield's snappy cheese
  93. Snickers bars
  94. Sun-Maid raisins
  95. Sunkist California oranges
  96. Swans Down cake flour
  97. Tootsie pops
  98. Underwood deviled ham
  99. Wheaties (breakfast cereal)
  100. White Mountain baking powder
In 1935, potato soup was a popular Depression-era food trend.

In 1935, potato soup was a popular Depression-era food trend.

15. Depression-Era Dining

The Great Depression (1929-41) caused widespread food shortages of meat, milk, and other pantry staples. During this economic downturn, people learned to stretch their dollars and avoid waste by eating simple meals. Encyclopedia.com tells us that “Cookbooks and radio programs offered recipes, including those for ‘poor man's cake’ (a cake made without flour) and green tomato mincemeat, a kind of relish. Instead of buying canned food, women would take the fresh produce from their own gardens and can, pickle, and preserve it. A family of six could be fed on about five dollars of groceries each week, but every penny counted.”

Here are 100 popular Depression-era foods:

  1. Baked apple pudding
  2. Baked apples
  3. Baked bean sandwich
  4. Banana and nut sandwich
  5. Beans and sausage
  6. Boston brown bread and chopped peanuts sandwich
  7. Bread and butter pickles
  8. Bread and butter sandwich (no filling)
  9. Buttermilk biscuits
  10. Buttermilk pie
  11. Cabbage and pasta
  12. Cabbage soup
  13. Carrot cake
  14. Carrot cookies
  15. Celery and uncooked cabbage sandwich
  16. Celery sandwich
  17. Chipped beef on toast
  18. Chocolate cream pie
  19. Cocoa cream pie
  20. Corn chowder
  21. Corn succotash
  22. Cornbread
  23. Corned beef fritters
  24. Corned beef salad
  25. Cornmeal dumplings
  26. Cream of celery soup
  27. Creamed chicken on biscuits
  28. Creamed peas on toast
  29. Creamed winter greens
  30. Cucumber and radish sandwich
  31. Cucumber sandwich
  32. Dandelion salad
  33. Dark chocolate pudding
  34. Egg drop soup
  35. Egg sandwich
  36. Fried bologna sandwich
  37. Frozen fruit salad
  38. Graham cracker pie crust
  39. Grape pie
  40. Green tomato pie
  41. Grilled sweet corn
  42. Hoe cake
  43. Homebread bread
  44. Homemade chunky applesauce
  45. Homemade ice cream
  46. Homemade noodles
  47. Homemade pickles
  48. Hominy beef chili
  49. Hoover stew
  50. Hot dogs and beans
  51. Jam sandwich
  52. Jelly sandwich
  53. Ketchup, mayonnaise, and onion sandwich
  54. Kraft macaroni and cheese
  55. Lemon parsley potatoes
  56. Lettuce and radish sandwich
  57. Lettuce sandwich
  58. Lima bean soup
  59. Meatloaf
  60. Milkorno (Milk and corn mixed together became a "superfood” of the Depression.)
  61. Mulligan stew
  62. Navy bean soup
  63. Pasta and peas
  64. Peanut butter bread without yeast
  65. Peanut butter sandwich
  66. Peanut butter and onion sandwich
  67. Pecan pie
  68. Pimento sandwich
  69. Poor man’s cake without eggs or dairy
  70. Pork stew
  71. Potato casseroles
  72. Potato pancakes
  73. Potato salad
  74. Potato soup
  75. Prune pudding
  76. Red velvet cake
  77. Rice pudding
  78. Roasted cabbage and onions
  79. Sardine sandwich
  80. Scalloped potatoes with mushrooms
  81. Shoo fly pie
  82. Skillet cabbage
  83. Spaghetti with boiled carrots and white sauce
  84. Spinach souffle
  85. Stewed tomatoes with bread
  86. Stuffed olive sandwich
  87. Three-bean baked beans
  88. Tomato and green pepper sandwich
  89. Tomato and horseradish sandwich
  90. Tomato and lettuce sandwich
  91. Tomato cakes
  92. Tomato sandwich
  93. Tomato soup sandwich
  94. Tuna salad with tomatoes
  95. Turnips with greens
  96. Vanilla Depression cake
  97. Vegetable lentil soup
  98. Vinegar pie
  99. Wacky chocolate cake without butter or eggs
  100. Water pie (Mashed.com reveals that all that you need to make this sweet, buttery dessert is hot water, vanilla, sugar, butter, flour, and pie crust.)
In 1935, a poor man's cake—a cake made without flour—was a popular dessert with families trying to get the most from every dollar.

In 1935, a poor man's cake—a cake made without flour—was a popular dessert with families trying to get the most from every dollar.

16. Famous Birthdays

Here are some of the famous people who were born in 1935:

  1. Bob Denver: TV actor
  2. Bob Gibson: Baseball player
  3. Bob Uecker: Baseball player
  4. Bobby Vinton: Pop singer
  5. Bruno Sammartino: Wrestler
  6. Charles Grodin: Movie actor
  7. Christina Pickles: TV actress
  8. Dalai Lama: Religious leader
  9. Diahann Carroll (1935-2019): TV actress
  10. Donald Sutherland: Movie actor
  11. Dudley Moore: Movie actor
  12. Elvis Presley: Rock singer
  13. Frank Robinson: Baseball player
  14. Gary Player: Golfer
  15. Herb Alpert: Entrepreneur
  16. Jack Welch: Entrepreneur
  17. Jerry Lee Lewis: Rock singer
  18. Jerry Orbach (1935-2004): Movie actor
  19. Johnny Mathis: Pop singer
  20. Julie Andrews: Movie actress
  21. Ken Kesey: Novelist
  22. Mary Berry: TV show host
  23. Sandy Koufax: Baseball player
  24. Sonny Bono (1935-98): Rock singer
  25. Woody Allen: Director

17. Notable Weddings

These trivia facts have been made available courtesy of OnThisDay.com.

  1. On April 14, PGA golfer Ben Hogan married Valerie Fox.
  2. On August 19, French singer Édith Piaf wed Andrew Johnseppe.
  3. On September 28, comedian and actor Stan Laurel married actress Virginia Ruth Rogers.
  4. On October 8, Ozzie Nelson wed Harriet Hilliard. They later co-starred in the sitcom The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet, which aired on ABC television from October 3, 1952 to April 23, 1966.
  5. On November 9, actress Jane Wyatt married investment broker Edgar Bethune Ward.

18. Famous People Who Died

This information has been made available courtesy of FamousBirthdays.com.

  1. Alice Dunbar Nelson: American poet
  2. Arthur Henderson: British politician
  3. Bennie Moten: American jazz pianist
  4. Charles Demuth: American painter and photographer
  5. Charlotte Perkins Gilman: American writer
  6. Childe Hassam: American painter
  7. Clarence Day: American author
  8. Edwin Arlington Robinson: American poet and writer
  9. Emmy Noether: German mathematician
  10. Henry Fairfield Osborn: American geologist and paleontologist
  11. Huey Long: American politician
  12. James Henry Breasted: American archaeologist
  13. Jessie Wilcox Smith: American illustrator
  14. Lafayette Mendel: American biochemist
  15. Leroy Carr: American musician
  16. Lucy, Lady Duff-Gordon: British costume designer
  17. Ma Barker: Matriarch of the notorious Barker family
  18. Martha Carey Thomas: American linguist
  19. Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.: Former Associate Justice of the Supreme Court
  20. Princess Victoria of the United Kingdom
  21. Samuel Sachs: American banker and entrepreneur
  22. T. E. Lawrence: British archaeologist
  23. Thelma Todd: American actress
  24. Wiley Post: American aviator
  25. Will Rogers: American vaudeville performer
Mutiny on the Bounty was a 1935 film adaptation of Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall’s 1932 novel of the same name. It starred Charles Laughton and Clark Gable, and became the highest-grossing film of 1935.

Mutiny on the Bounty was a 1935 film adaptation of Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall’s 1932 novel of the same name. It starred Charles Laughton and Clark Gable, and became the highest-grossing film of 1935.

19. U.S. Automobile Production Figures for the Year

Here are the U.S. automobile production figures for 1935:

  1. Ford: 820,253
  2. Chevrolet: 548,215
  3. Plymouth: 350,884
  4. Pontiac: 178,770
  5. Dodge: 158,999
  6. Oldsmobile: 126,768
  7. Hudson: 101,080
  8. Buick: 53,249

20. American Companies and Brands Established During 1935

  1. 20th Century Studios, Inc. (formerly, Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation): An American film studio that is a subsidiary of Walt Disney Studios, a division of the Walt Disney Company.
  2. GNC: With headquarters in China and an American office in Pittsburgh, GNC specializes in health and nutrition-related products, including vitamins, supplements, minerals, herbs, sports nutrition, diet, and energy products.
  3. Heaven Hill: A private, family-owned and operated distillery that is headquartered in Bardstown, Kentucky. The company produces and markets the Heaven Hill brand of Kentucky straight bourbon whiskey and a variety of other distilled spirits.
  4. Invesco: An investment management company that is headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia.
  5. Morgan Stanley: An investment bank and financial services company located in New York City.
  6. Rainbow Shops: Commonly referred to as Rainbow, a retail apparel chain that specializes in moderately-priced brands for teens and young women.
  7. Raley’s: A privately-held, family-owned supermarket chain that operates 126 stores under the Raley's, Bel Air Markets, Nob Hill Foods, Food Source, and Sak N’ Save banners in northern California and Nevada.
  8. Roto-Rooter: A company that provides plumbing, sewer, and drain services to both residential and commercial customers.
  9. Tyson Foods—the world's second largest processor of chicken, beef, and pork—was founded in 1935 by John W. Tyson. Located in Springdale, Arkansas, Tyson also operates a number of major food brands, including Jimmy Dean and Hillshire Farms.
  10. Webster Bank: An American commercial bank that is based in Waterbury, Connecticut.
Raley’s—a privately-held, family-owned supermarket chain that operates 126 stores under the Raley's, Bel Air Markets, Nob Hill Foods, Food Source, and Sak N’ Save banners in northern California and Nevada—was founded in 1935.

Raley’s—a privately-held, family-owned supermarket chain that operates 126 stores under the Raley's, Bel Air Markets, Nob Hill Foods, Food Source, and Sak N’ Save banners in northern California and Nevada—was founded in 1935.

References:

In 1935, the Detroit Tigers defeated the Chicago Cubs, four games to two, to win their first World Series.

In 1935, the Detroit Tigers defeated the Chicago Cubs, four games to two, to win their first World Series.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2021 Gregory DeVictor

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