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60+ Amazing Words You've Never Heard Of

Chris is an editor who studied literature for over a decade. He loves learning the meanings of unusual words and sharing them with others.

In this article, you'll learn 60+ words you've never heard of. If you need to win a game of Scrabble or need help finding the perfect word for your short story, this list is for you! Each word is further explained by being placed in a sentence.

In this article, you'll learn 60+ words you've never heard of. If you need to win a game of Scrabble or need help finding the perfect word for your short story, this list is for you! Each word is further explained by being placed in a sentence.

60+ of the Most Amazing, Unusual, and Interesting Words in the English Language

Have you been scouring the internet for the perfect word to use in a sentence? Are you trying to make your writing stand out? Are you having trouble expressing yourself perfectly in a poem, essay, or story? Whether you're writing a novel, entering a spelling bee, or trying to upstage some word nerds, your search is over!

This article provides you with a stockpile of wonderful, quirky words, as well as two additional lists! One features 15 weird words that begin with the letter "x," while the other showcases 15 weird medical terms!

#1-15#16-30#31-45#46-60

1. Accouchement

16. Duende

31. Indite

46. Protean

2. Aglet

17. Empyrean

32. Jow

47. Psilanthropy

3. Annalist

18. Emulous

33. Kvell

48. Quaesitum

4. Aphyllous

19. Epergne

34. Legerity

49. Quaff

5. Bequeath

20. Epexegesis

35. Logorrhea

50. Quiddity

6. Billet-doux

21. Eschew

36. Majuscule

51. Rupestrian

7. Bonhomie

22. Falstaffian

37. Matronymic

52. Salmagundi

8. Burgher

23. Fantod

38. Mirific

53. Sanative

9. Charivari

24. Fulsome

39. Multivocal

54. Synecdoche

10. Chartreuse

25. Gelid

40. Nurdle

55. Subitaneous

11. Chinook

26. Ghost word

41. Obnubilate

56. Tertiary

12. Coeval

27. Hinterland

42. Paladin

57. Toxophilite

13. Cognoscente

28. Hyaline

43. Personalia

58. Transmogrify

14. Cosmopolis

29. Icarian

44. Polychromy

59. Widdershins

15. Cynosure

30. Ineluctable

45. Poppycock

60. Winkle

1. Accouchement

(noun) the process of giving birth to a baby

In a Sentence

During her second accouchement she had a much more attentive doctor

2. Aglet

(noun) a metal or plastic tube fixed tightly round each end of a shoelace; any of various ornamental studs, cords, or pins worn on clothing

In a Sentence

The young man's royal blue shoelaces had gold aglets on their tips

The store made custom jackets, allowing customers to choose from a range of additions such as patches, embroidered words, and various aglets like studs, pins, and metallic beads

3. Annalist

(noun) a person who write historical records or records the activities of an organization

In a Sentence

There is a brand-new book out by Ireland's best-known annalist of the Irish Civil War

4. Aphyllous

(adjective) having no leaves

In a Sentence

The children looked up and saw snow falling through the branches of the aphyllous trees lining their street

5. Bequeath

(verb) to give or leave by last will; to hand down or pass on

In a Sentence

The elderly woman decided to bequeath her wedding ring to her granddaughter

6. Billet-doux

(noun) a love letter

In a Sentence

The second-grade boy wrote a billet-doux to the girl who sat across from him in class

7. Bonhomie

(noun) good-natured, easy friendliness; geniality

In a Sentence

On the night of the big game, the bar was filled with an atmosphere of bonhomie

8. Burgher

(noun) a citizen of a town or city; a member of the middle class

In a Sentence

Many of the local burghers found the college students unpleasant

9. Charivari

(noun; historical) a noisy mock serenade performed by a group of people to celebrate a marriage or mock an unpopular person; an elaborate, noisy celebration

In a Sentence

The newly-weds were surrounded by a charivari as their friends danced about banging pots and pans and blowing kazoos and whistles

10. Chartreuse

(noun) a variable color averaging a brilliant yellow-green

(noun) a pale green or yellow liqueur made from brandy and aromatic herbs

In a Sentence

The fishermen discovered that they caught more fish using the half-ounce chartreuse spinnerbaits

Green and Yellow Chartreuse have been distilled by the Carthusian monks of France for nearly 300 years

11. Chinook

(noun) warm winds that blow down the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains

(proper noun) a member of a Native American people who formerly inhabited the Columbia River valley and adjacent territories

In a Sentence

The chinook blowing from the lee of the mountain slope was warm and dry, prompting us to remove our heavy coats for the time being

President George W. Bush, in a very unexpected turn of events, revoked the federal government's recognition of the Chinook Nation in 2002

12. Coeval

(noun) of the same era or period, a contemporary

(adjective) of the same or equal age, antiquity, or duration

In a Sentence

The use of fur pelts to cover the body, furniture, or a tent is coeval with the earliest history of certain tribal nations

They were thought to be coeval stars due to them having nearly the same mass and brightness

13. Cognoscente

(noun) a person with expert, specialized knowledge in a subject; a connoisseur

In a Sentence

The tour guide at the Vatican Museums was a true cognoscente who had studied the museums' pieces for decades

14. Cosmopolis

(noun) a large city whose inhabitants are from many different countries

In a Sentence

New York is a booming cosmopolis where people come from around the globe to pursue their ambitions

15. Cynosure

(noun) a person or thing that is the center of attention or admiration

In a Sentence

The Ferrari was the cynosure of the car meetup

16. Duende

(noun) the ability to attract or inspire through magnetism and charm

In a Sentence

She had incredible duende that helped her move up the corporate ladder easily

17. Empyrean

(noun; historical) the highest sphere of heaven, which in ancient and medieval cosmology was a realm of pure fire or light

(adjective) relating to the heavens or the sky; heavenly or sublime

In a Sentence

In the book the Paradiso, Dante ascends to the Empyrean beyond physical existence, where he is enveloped in light

Many movies have portrayed heaven as filled with harps, suggesting that it is the proper instrument for empyrean music

18. Emulous

(adjective) eager or driven to equal or surpass another; motivated by a spirit of rivalry

In a Sentence

The emulous cult members vied for their leader's attention and blessings

19. Epergne

(noun) an ornamental, often tiered, centerpiece for a table with arms to support holders for flowers, fruits, sweetmeats, and more

In a Sentence

The wrought metal branches and glittering crystal drops of the epergne flashed the dining room's light off of them

20. Epexegesis

(noun) additional explanation or explanatory material

In a Sentence

After finishing his presentation, the lawyer saw his audience's confusion and quickly added an epexegesis for further clarification

21. Eschew

(verb) to avoid or refrain from participating in or partaking of something, often on moral or practical grounds

In a Sentence

Some academic professionals eschew the title of "professor," preferring to call themselves historians, philosophers, sociologists, botanists, etc.

Although she seemed to enjoy a glamorous lifestyle, she often eschewed nightclubs, public appearances, and interviews

22. Falstaffian

(adjective) having qualities similar to the Shakespeare character Falstaff, especially his good-natured mischievousness, bold arrogance, and comical indecency

In a Sentence

His grandfather grew Falstaffian after a couple of beers, cracking jokes, telling exaggerated stories of his past, and playfully starting trouble between family members

23. Fantod

(noun) a state of nervous irritability and tension, sometimes referred to as "fidgets"; an outburst of emotion or a fit

In a Sentence

His friend's strange and erratic behavior gave him the fantods

24. Fulsome

(adjective) excessively flattering; generous in spirit; characterized by abundance

In a Sentence

Her fulsome apology was elaborate and unrestrained

The airline passengers' fulsome praise of the pilot was justified after he maneuvered the undocumented storm with great skill

The verbose author described the mundane scene in fulsome detail

25. Gelid

(adjective) extremely cold; icy

In a Sentence

The survivalist regretted wading into the gelid lake, as the near-frozen water was almost intolerable

26. Ghost word

(noun) a word that has entered a dictionary, grammar, or other authoritative reference work through misreading of manuscripts, mistaking a typographical error as a word, etc., and thus is never actually established in a language

In a Sentence

Scholars made arguments for the origin and meaning of the word "morse" in Sir Walter Scott's novel The Monastery; however, after consulting the original manuscript, it later became clear that "morse" was a ghost word, being a simple misprint of "nurse"

27. Hinterland

(noun) backcountry, or a region of land that is remote from metropolitan areas; an area directly inland from a coast or large river

In a Sentence

The colonies were very close to the coastline, leaving the hinterland largely unexplored

28. Hyaline

(adjective) glassy; transparent as glass

(noun) something that is transparent

In a Sentence

The Florida Keys' hyaline coastal waters are still and see-through

Through the hyaline, the ship came sailing

29. Icarian

(adjective) having qualities similar to the Greek mythological character Icarus, especially his excessive ambition and recklessness

In a Sentence

The young man's Icarian nature led him to repeatedly overstep his competencies and fail

30. Ineluctable

(adjective) not to be stopped, escaped, or ignored

In a Sentence

Her friend annoyed her by always arguing their opinion as if it was ineluctable fact

31. Indite

(verb) to put in writing; compose

In a Sentence

Some exceptional writers take pains to indite elegant sentences throughout their essays

32. Jow

(noun) the tolling or ringing sound of a bell

(verb) to ring or toll a bell; hit or strike (in the head)

In a Sentence

A deep jow echoed across the empty churchyard

The girl landed an unexpected jow and he fell back with his hand across his right ear

33. Kvell

(verb) to feel extremely proud of something or someone; to rejoice

In a Sentence

The little girl's grandmother would kvell over everything the girl did

34. Legerity

(noun) agility of mind or body; nimbleness

In a Sentence

The young man's quick-witted remarks and thoughtfulness displayed impressive legerity

35. Logorrhea

(noun) excessive talkativeness, especially when incoherent or uncontrollable

In a Sentence

She rambled on and on without direction, her logorrhea annoying everyone around her

36. Majuscule

(noun) a large letter, often capital, used frequently in medieval manuscripts

In a Sentence

The Book of Kells is written in a beautiful majuscule script that originated in Ireland

37. Matronymic

(noun) a name derived from the mother's or another female ancestor's name

In a Sentence

The infant's matronymic was meant to honor his great aunt

38. Mirific

(adjective) working wonders or achieving marvelous things

In a Sentence

The ambitious young woman would go on a series of mirific adventures during her twenties

39. Multivocal

(adjective) signifying numerous things; having many meanings of equal likelihood or validity

In a Sentence

The multivocal word preoccupied historians of the language for some time

40. Nurdle

(verb) to score a run in cricket by deflecting the ball rather than hitting it with force

(noun) a tiny plastic pellet used as the raw material in plastic product manufacturing

In a Sentence

Pakistan was able to nurdle the ball enough that they won the game using light-powered trick-shots

The massive mound of nurdles was destined to become cheap children's toys at fast-food restaurants

41. Obnubilate

(verb) obscure; to darken or dim as with a cloud

In a Sentence

The remnants of his strictly Catholic childhood obnubilated his feelings

42. Paladin

(noun) a champion of a cause; a reliable military leader

In a Sentence

The activist Samuel Gompers was a paladin of child labor reform in the late 1800s

43. Personalia

(plural noun) personal belongings or affairs; biographical anecdotes or references

In a Sentence

The writer's personalia were of interest to his biographers, as they seemed to hold the key to his opinions of his family

44. Polychromy

(noun) making or decorating in numerous colors, especially in sculpture and architecture

In a Sentence

People often think of ancient Rome as being a black and white world; however, Roman sculptors often used polychromy in their pieces, coloring them with a wide range of pigments

45. Poppycock

(noun) empty or senseless talk; nonsense

In a Sentence

The corrupt official's wife regarded all of the accusations against him as poppycock

46. Protean

(adjective) exhibiting great diversity or variety; the ability to continually change behavior or appearance

In a Sentence

As a guitarist, he was quite protean, playing metal, blues, jazz, and folk music with ease

47. Psilanthropy

(noun) the belief that Jesus Christ was a mere mortal and not the son of God

In a Sentence

The young man was inclined to psilanthropy and argued that Jesus was simply a philosopher and social critic

48. Quaesitum

(noun) a solution; something sought after

In a Sentence

The scholar had the fleeting feeling that his new book was his quaesitum

49. Quaff

(verb) drinking (usually alcohol) heartily and quickly

In a Sentence

As a lad, he'd been known to quaff a few pints in under twenty minutes

50. Quiddity

(noun) a petty point, quibble, or eccentricity

(noun; philosophy) the essence, or real nature, of something

In a Sentence

After a few minutes of heated debate, the two men paused and laughed, realizing they were fighting over a quiddity of language

The young woman's quiddity became apparent when she decided to put a hold on her career to join an international humanitarian organization

51. Rupestrian

(adjective) made, composed, or found on rock or cave walls (often referring to art)

In a Sentence

The catacombs beneath Rome are filled with rupestrian artworks

52. Salmagundi

(noun) a miscellany or medley; a dish of chopped meats, eggs, and vegetables (usually including anchovies and onions), presented in rows for contrast

In a Sentence

The museum offered a salmagundi of photos, letters, and sketches from the writer's life

The Baroness pushed her untouched salmagundi away from her in disinterest

53. Sanative

(adjective) restorative or curative; having the power to heal or cure

In a Sentence

Meditation is my most sanative activity

54. Synecdoche

(noun) a figure of speech that uses a part of something to represent the whole, or the whole to represent a part (for example, saying "boots on the ground" to refer to soldiers, or saying "bread" to refer to food)

In a Sentence

The flea market salesman got in the habit of using a synecdoche for all forms of payment by asking customers whether they'd like to pay with "paper or plastic" (as in "cash or card")

55. Subitaneous

(adjective) sudden; taking place unexpectedly; ready for immediate development

In a Sentence

He woke at 5:30am with a subitaneous solution to completing his book

Arcatia copepods lay subitaneous eggs, which hatch within 48 hours

56. Tertiary

(adjective) of third rank, order, importance, or value

In a Sentence

The training of student assistants was tertiary in the high school's overall classroom instructional policy, and so only a few classes had them

57. Toxophilite

(noun) someone very fond of or expert at archery

In a Sentence

The toxophilite hit bullseyes with 90% consistency at the range

58. Transmogrify

(verb) to completely alter or change, often to grotesque or strange effect

In a Sentence

The heroin addict, mild-mannered when sober, would quickly transmogrify into a rude and hateful woman when high

59. Widdershins

(adverb) in a wrong or contrary direction; counter-clockwise

In a Sentence

The boy was in the habit of swinging his bat three times widdershins in his left hand before stepping up to the plate

60. Winkle

(noun) small sea snails, most commonly Littorina littorea

(noun; British) obtain or draw something out with difficulty

In a Sentence

The woman gathered a small basket of winkles on the beach to prepare as a delicacy for her family later that day

The cunning man was always able to unexpectedly winkle secrets out of people

15 Words That Begin With "X"

WordDefinition

Xu

An aluminum coin, similar to a cent, once minted by South Vietnam

Xyst

A covered portico; a walkway in a garden covered by trees

Xerus

An African ground squirrel with spiny hair and a long tail

Xylem

A woody vascular tissue in land plants that conducts water and minerals through the stem and leaves and also stores food

Xyloid

Having the qualities of wood or resembling wood

Xyster

A surgical instrument used to scrape bones

Xenolith

A piece of rock that is different from the rock in which it is embedded

Xylocarp

A hard, woody fruit, such as a coconut

Xerophyte

A plant adapted for life where water is scare; a desert plant

Xylograph

A woodcut or wood engraving, especially used for printing

Xenogamy

Cross-pollination between the flowers of different plants; a cross-cultural marriage

Xanthophyll

A yellow-to-orange pigment found in plants; the basis for the yellow color seen in autumn foliage

Xiphisternum

The small extension at the end of the sternum that is made of cartilage

Xerophthalmia

A dry conjunctivitis that comes from a severe lack of vitamin A

Xenotransplant

The transplant of an organ or tissue between members of different species

15 Weird Medical Terms

WordDefinition

Anosognosia

When a person experiences a lack of insight into their own mental illness; that is, they either are unaware of it or misperceive it in an important way

Borborygmus

The growling or rumbling noises made by the stomach and intestines as food, fluids, and gas pass through them

Crepitus

Grinding, popping, grating, and creaking sounds made by joints when they move

Epistaxis

Bleeding from the nose; a nosebleed

Eructation

Release of gas or air from the stomach or throat; a burp or belch

Gossypiboma

Describes a bundle of gauze, sponges, towels, and/or other surgical cotton materials accidentally left in a body cavity after surgery

Onychocryptosis

A condition when the corner or side of a toenail grows into the surrounding flesh; an ingrown toenail

Orthostatic Hypotension

Low blood pressure that occurs when standing after sitting or lying down for a period, and that causes dizziness or lightheadedness and, on occasion, fainting

Paresthesia

A tingly or prickly sensation that is often temporary and occurs in extremities such as the hands and feet; commonly referred to as "pins and needles"

Proctalgia

Painful (often temporary) spasms of the pelvic floor, anal sphincter, or rectal muscles

Rhinotillexomania

A disorder causing compulsive nose-picking to the point of self-harm

Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

A heart condition brought on by extreme emotional or physical stress that causes the left ventricle to change shape and enlarge, resulting in weakened heart muscles (nicknamed "broken heart syndrome")

Transient Lingual Papillitis

A painful inflammation of the tongue's fungiform papillae (which contain taste buds) that usually occurs near the tip of the tongue (sometimes referred to as "lie bumps")

Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty

A surgical procedure to open the upper airways by removing excess tissue in the throat

Vasovagal Syncope

A sudden drop in blood pressure and pulse that causes fainting and is brought on by an overreaction to certain triggers, such as the sight of blood or emotional distress

  • 60+ Awesome Sounding Words | Owlcation
    Looking for inspiration, or just curious about the most epic and awesome words in the English language? Read on to uncover the 60 most awesome sounding words and their meanings!

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.