Book Review: Inferno - Owlcation - Education
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Book Review: Inferno

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book-review-inferno

Title

Inferno

Author

Dan Brown

Language

English

Genre

Mystery/Thriller

Series

Robert Langdon #4

Publisher

Doubleday

Date of Publication

May 14, 2013

No. of Pages

609

ISBN

978-0-385-53785-8

Preceded by

The Lost Symbol

Followed by

Origin

Inferno is a mystery thriller by Dan Brown and is the fourth book in his Robert Langdon series, the previous ones being Angels & Demons, The Da Vinci Code and The Lost Symbol. The next book in the series is Origin. Inferno was published in 2013 and was later adapted into a film.

Nothing is more creative... nor destructive... than a brilliant mind with a purpose.

— Dan Brown, Inferno

Summary

Robert Langdon, a Harvard University professor wakes up in a hospital with little recollection of what has happened to him. He has been shot in the head but he recalls nothing. To his utter shock, he realizes he is in Florence, Italy. Suddenly Vayentha, an assassin enters the scene trying to kill him. Robert manages to escape with the help of Dr. Sienne Brooks. Soon Robert finds a cylinder with a biohazard sign which was hidden in his jacket. He realizes that there are some mysterious people out there to kill him while his own government is not supporting him and probably wants him dead. On opening the cylinder, Robert Langdon finds that it is fitted with a hi-tech projector that displays a modified version of Botticelli’s Map of Hell which was in turn inspired by Dante’s Inferno. Trying to decipher the mystery, Langdon comes to know of a potential plague threat by the genius scientist Zobrist who believes that the human species will come to an end in 100 years due to the ever-increasing population. Zobrist believes that the only solution to this problem is if the human population is reduced to its one-third by some drastic measures. After WHO refuses to listen to him, Zobrist has decided to take the matters into his own hands. The search for this potential biochemical threat takes Langdon to different parts of Florence, Venice and Istanbul.


The decisions of our past are the architects of our present.

— Dan Brown, Inferno

book-review-inferno

My Review

I am a big fan of Dan Brown's works and had pre-ordered the book. But the sheer size of the book prevented me from reading it for two years. I finally read it just before the film was about to come out as I prefer to read the book before seeing its film adaptation.

The novel is very interesting. The gripping tale keeps the readers glued to the book till the end. The book is well-written and descriptive. It's a very well-researched novel with some thought-provoking questions. The book teaches much about art, history, geography and culture as well as confronting one of the most crucial issues facing our planet today...overpopulation. The story churns out surprise after surprise and you're kept guessing who the real culprit is.

Dan Brown knows how to skillfully incorporate art, literature, and history into an exciting and thrilling story of suspense and danger. It is a fast paced, compelling book but the end is a little frustrating. I wish the end was a little different!

My Rating: 4/5

Tom Hanks & Felicity Jones in 'Inferno'

Tom Hanks & Felicity Jones in 'Inferno'

Inferno (Film)

Inferno is a 2016 American film directed by Ron Howard and written by David Koepp, based on the novel of the same name by Dan Brown. Tom Hanks reprised his role as Robert Langdon in the film. The film aslo stars Felicity Jones, Omar Sy, Sidse Babett Knudsen, Ben Foster, and Irrfan Khan. The film's end deviates significantly from the one in the book.

The darkest places in hell are reserved for those who maintain their silence at times of crisis.

— Dan Brown, Inferno

Dan Brown

Dan Brown

About The Author

Dan Brown is a reputed American author who is famous for his novels, most notably the Robert Langdon series which includes Angels & Demons, The Da Vinci Code,The Lost Symbol, Inferno and Origin . He is well-known for the recurring themes of cryptography, keys, symbols, codes, art, and conspiracy theories in his novels. Three of his novels have been adapted into films. His other books include Digital Fortress and Deception Point.

© 2018 Shaloo Walia

Comments

Shaloo Walia (author) from India on October 16, 2018:

@Jean Inferno is my least favorite of all Dan Brown books. The main reason for it is the way it ends.

Jean Bakula from New Jersey on October 16, 2018:

I am a fan too! I have this book on my Kindle, but always find another to read first. I will do it now, after reading your great review!

Shaloo Walia (author) from India on July 17, 2018:

@Dana I too prefer to read the book first. Movies hardly do justice to the book. And in this case, they have totally changed the ending.

Dana Tate from LOS ANGELES on July 17, 2018:

Although The Da Vinci code is not new I have never seen it. The Inferno seems interesting. I always prefer to read the book prior to seeing the movie. The movie rarely measures up. Nice review

Shaloo Walia (author) from India on July 06, 2018:

@Manatita This book deals with symbolism based on Dante's Divine Comedy whose first part is Inferno. Hence, the book is titled Inferno.

manatita44 from london on July 06, 2018:

Born to write, I'd say. I know of his books and the movie. Inferno sèems to be a popular topic or theme. Nice work!

Shaloo Walia (author) from India on July 06, 2018:

I have read all of Dan Brown's books. Inferno is my least favorite of all because i didn't like its end. Howerver, I still liked the book for all the art, history and other details of Itlay and Turkey. Many people think that he's too much into details and find that boring. But I find this to be the USP of his writing.

Rinita Sen on July 05, 2018:

I skipped the first paragraph because it contained spoilers and I am yet to read this. I have read till "The lost symbol". I love Dan Brown's style and research, but I thought he was losing his grip on the stories starting The lost symbol. You mentioned that the end was frustrating, well, I felt the same for The lost symbol. Maybe it is time for him to move away from the Langdon thrillers, and delve into other topics.

Your presentation is very well done. I really liked the structure of this article.