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Review for the Found-Footage Documentary Film "1969: Moon Shot"

Ms. Inglish has been a professional writer and critic of films, books, music and theater for over 20 years.

Apollo 11: Catching Some Sun. Here is the the Eagle and pilot Buzz Aldrin unfurling a long sheet of foil known as the Solar Wind Collector.

Apollo 11: Catching Some Sun. Here is the the Eagle and pilot Buzz Aldrin unfurling a long sheet of foil known as the Solar Wind Collector.

Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the American Moon Landing

The ABC series "1969" began on April 23, 2019 with the episode "Moon Shot", reminding the world of the magical U.S. feat of landing on the moon under the terms of President John F. Kennedy's insistence in 1962 to be there before the end of the decade.

The first episode was well received and featured former astronaut Michael Collins along with present astronauts like Stephanie Wilson (STS-120, STS-121, and STS-131) and Robert Behnken (STS-123, STS-130 Endeavour) to comment on aerospace history and retired pros from the 1960s like flight administrator Gerry Griffin and astronaut/command module communicator Charlie Duke.

Surprisingly, Buzz Aldrin did not appear in the episode except in archived footage of the Apollo 11 mission. He was busy with his plans for a gala black-tie dinner and celebration with special guest speakers at Kennedy Space Center in July 2019.

The Moon's a little cracked and I'm a little wrinkled. Some wear and tear here and there doesn't mean we're broken!

— Buzz Aldrin; Twitter, April 24, 2019

Former Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins at the Congressional Gold Medal ceremony in the Rotunda at the U.S. Capitol ; 11-16- 2011.

Former Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins at the Congressional Gold Medal ceremony in the Rotunda at the U.S. Capitol ; 11-16- 2011.

Michael Collins Speaks

Former astronaut Collins held a variety of important positions after returning to Earth, but claimed that he did not want to go back to space, according to some accounts - he reportedly spoke about wanting to spend a lot of time growing a garden.

Collins spoke extensively in the documentary about the magic of the moon mission to bring people together all over the world. He felt that, like the Olympic Games, the Moon Shot made people forget about growing stresses and fears surrounding race riots, the rise of feminism, and the Viet Nam Conflict for a while.

This all caused me to remember a 1969 race riot in Columbus, Ohio that resulted in an official city curfew one night that trapped many people at friends' homes.

Houston Control at Apollo 11 liftoff.

Houston Control at Apollo 11 liftoff.

Former astronaut Charlie Duke agreed with Collins's statements, recalling that many of his friends were prisoners of war in Viet Nam when he was a communications officer talking to Neil Armstrong on the moon. During July 2019, Charlie will be one of the guest speakers at the 50th Anniversary celebration of Apollo 11.

Charlie and many others who appeared in the documentary spoke of the stresses and worries of the Mission Control men during their days and nights at their consoles in July 2019. Film footage included scenes of the men brushing away tears as the astronaut crew made it safely back to Earth. When President Richard Nixon met them outside their quarantine center windows, he was fairly jumping up and down with excitement.

Charlie Duke, James Lovell, and Fred Haise at Mission Control during Apollo 11.

Charlie Duke, James Lovell, and Fred Haise at Mission Control during Apollo 11.

Reverend Ralph Abernathy Objects

Reverend Abernathy's contribution for and against the moon mission was a welcomed presentation, because many of us in the North did not see the film footage of his peaceful protests in 1969. The film was simply not shown up here in Ohio.

Apollo 11 did not cure hunger, but the U.S> Space Program resulted in medical miracles like kidney dialysis and other lifesaving technologies.

Apollo 11 did not cure hunger, but the U.S> Space Program resulted in medical miracles like kidney dialysis and other lifesaving technologies.

Reverend Abernathy's daughter spoke on film about how her father was aggrieved that $33 Billion went to the moon landing when people on Earth were starving.

NASA representative Thomas Payne went to meet Abernathy and over 300 peaceful protestors to explain that the billions spent in July 1969 was a drop in the bucket compared to what would be needed to cure hunger in the War on Poverty. He took a group of ten protestor families up to the observation area at Cape Kennedy to watch the launch. The reverend said he was awed and that Cape Kennedy was hallowed ground.

Hunger has remained a problem 50 years later.

$33,000,000,000 in 1969 = $229,000,000,000 in 2019.

Ralph David Abernathy, Sr. (1926-1990)

Ralph David Abernathy, Sr. (1926-1990)

Women Put Us on the Moon

Two women portrayed in the film "Hidden Figures" appeared in the documentary: Katherine Johnson and Christine Darden. Katherine's daughter also appeared, speaking admirably about her mother and the other women at NASA, but also all of the people working behind the scenes and on camera for Apollo 11 and the U.S. Space Program.

Margaret Hamilton also appeared. She was a pioneering female software engineer whose coding made the moon landing possible. She beamed as she said that her codes were the first software to run on the Moon.

Last Minute Course Correction

Despite all the preparations and mathematical figuring that happened on the ground, Neil Armstrong had to make a last-minute route change as the Eagle LEM approached the lunar surface. He had just 60 seconds to decide whether he could change course to prevent crashing on rocky terrain or to miss the landing and return to the Columbia Command Module.

The documentary includes film footage of the craters and rocks with moon-dust blowing under the engines of the Eagle, along with a few phrases spoken by Armstrong and Aldrin - mostly Oh God! Wow! My gosh!

Michael Collins in the documentary said that when the Eagle landed, most people around the world forgot all about national boundaries and race. Half a billion people watched television to see Neil and Buzz step onto the lunar surface, and Michael recalled rainbows all around the Columbia as it landed back home in the Pacific Ocean.

Such sentiments and camaraderie around the world would be a nice feature of life today, if we could achieve it.

Our Lunar Future

Many people alive in 1969 are no longer living, but I hope the memories of the Apollo 11 crew can be maintained through the coming centuries. This documentary is a good step toward that preservation.

In the National Air and Space Museum on the Smithsonian mallway in Washington D.C. I have seen many films containing footage of the U.S. Space Program through Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs. I am anxious to see if "1969: Moon Shot" will be added to the mix.

The documentary could be improved with an interview from Buzz Aldrin and some future film footage of the 50th Anniversary Gala, but I am glad to have seen it as it is.

Footage of new lunar landings are sure to follow.

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Washington DC

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Washington DC

Sources

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2019 Patty Inglish MS

Comments

Patty Inglish MS (author) from USA and Asgardia, the First Space Nation on May 16, 2019:

Hi Kaili! ) I too remember when people were excited over exploration in space. We're to build the Gateway Lunar space station soon, with a woman pilot flying a crew to operate it and the plans are controversial, so maybe that will create excitement.

Several former astronauts want to skip Gateway and head straight for Mars, but I think Gateway is a good staging platform to save energy, costs, and time in pursuit of Mars. I hope we see further exploration very soon!

Kaili Bisson from Canada on May 16, 2019:

What a wonderful article Patty. This brought back many wonderful memories. Everyone was glued to the TV during the moon landing. Those were exciting times and it seemed as though anything was possible.

Patty Inglish MS (author) from USA and Asgardia, the First Space Nation on May 01, 2019:

Thank you Dora! I remember the event as if it were just an hour ago. Probably always will.

Dora Weithers from The Caribbean on May 01, 2019:

Recalling the incident is just as is just as exciting as the event itself. Thanks for filling in some of the details and also for mentioning the women. Good read!

Patty Inglish MS (author) from USA and Asgardia, the First Space Nation on April 30, 2019:

@MizBejabbers - That sounds like fun to meet James Irwin. I remember he was involved in hunting for Noah's Ark at one point.

NASA had a program for senior citizen astronauts several years ago, but nothing came of it. I wonder if Mars One is still planning to send seniors to Mars permanently to colonize? It might be boring, but at least confining.

Patty Inglish MS (author) from USA and Asgardia, the First Space Nation on April 30, 2019:

@Eric Dierker - NASA engineers told us that Tang was already in stores by 1959 before it was first used on space flights; and the drink powder was not labeled as "Tang" for the space missions. I liked the grapefruit flavor better than the orange, but my local Kroger grocery store had orange Tang on sale for 99 cents a canister last week, so I bought one!

I eagerly await the new space station farther out and on the other side of the Moon - Lunar Gateway is coming soon.

How wonderful to have Dr. Shoemaker in your town back then!

Doris James MizBejabbers from Beautiful South on April 29, 2019:

Great article with some good memories, Patty. I remember sitting in our apartment in Lubbock, TX, with my then-husband and two small sons watching the first moon landing. What a thrill for us! Then a few years later we got to meet Apollo 15 astronaut James Irwin in Hobbs, NM. That was a thrill also. In fact I have a photos of my self and also of my sons with Mr. Irwin.

When the space program discontinued its moon flights and NASA shut down its space shuttle program, it was disappointing to most people I know. I'm wondering how well these private companies will succeed. Frankly, I'm too old to want to help colonize another planet.

Eric Dierker from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A. on April 29, 2019:

Fantastic Patty. I grew up in Flagstaff Arizona where the trained for much of the mission.Vast cinder fields and Mars Observatory. Dr. Shoemaker was a hero in our town. I certainly cried during the landing.

Thanks for including the contributions of women. It marked a time when though poorly portrayed at the time that if a "system" of any kind needs the best, women and race are never excluded.

I say we go again for an extended time. All the inovations produced is alone well worth the time and money. Was "Tang" created for this project?

Patty Inglish MS (author) from USA and Asgardia, the First Space Nation on April 29, 2019:

Hi Mike -

Thanks for remembering the 1960s and 1970s with me! I watched a couple of Disney specials on the U.S. Space Program as a child and have always since been fascinated.

As for the politics of feminism, I recall in the 1970s the day I began applying for minimum wage jobs to earn money for college and one interviewer, only in his 20s, told me right away, "You'd be taking a job from a man" and told me to leave. I continued to be shocked by such attitudes for 30 years!

mckbirdbks from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas on April 28, 2019:

Hello Patty - What a great piece of history for you to highlight for us. So much in your presentation reminds of us of what were are capable as a nation when we are pulled together to achieve greatness. 'Those were the days." I had to laugh when you included the rise of feminism as a national concern. I suppose it was, and perhaps in some quarters, still is a major concern. It does seem that there still is lose sleep over the fact that women can and do think for themselves.

The exploration of space seems to be on your list of favorite subjects. I certainly cannot fault you for that. The planet had pretty much been mapped out by the time are generation arrived.