Literary Evaluation of “Come, Sweet Death” by Manatita

Updated on March 12, 2018
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Endy is a motivation enthusiast. He believes in human development, loves poetry, and uses poetry to achieve his goal of impacting people.

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Overview of Come, Sweet Death by Manatita

Come, Sweet Death by Manatita is a poem that literally invites death to a play. The poet through this poem reveals five distinct feelings or dispositions:

1. First, the feeling of courage which was revealed by throwing invitation at death as contained in the title of the poem. It shows readiness to confront death or the preparedness for the ‘theological rapture’. That same feeling was seen in the closing line, ‘I’m coming HOME once more.’ But there is a conflict of interest here which I hope to discuss much later in the curse of this analysis.

2. Secondly, the feeling of pain suffered by the poet, perhaps from subsequent loss of loved one or an impending one. “Long have I traversed this stream of current, Punched and battered by turbulent waves.” Those lines indicated long or repeated suffering. And the ‘stream of current’ is the poet’s equivalent word for a suffering soul, that's, the soul punched and battered by turbulent waves. ‘Turbulent waves’ here is a phrase substitute for ‘hardship’, ‘pain’ ‘torture’ and ‘torments’ of painful emotions or life’s odds (stream of current) that the poet traversed.

3. Thirdly, the feeling of emotional entanglement with a mother’s failing health, which perhaps was the reason for the pain. The poet paints the picture of a mother suffering from Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar level).

4. Fourthly, the feeling of hopefulness in the lines “On the Elysian lap of Love, I rise.” and “I float on visionary memories for the bliss to come.” These lines speak of heaven, and the bliss of life to come. The phrase ‘I rise’ shows the poet's unshakable faith in the resurrection or the hope of overcoming the feelings that torture him at the moment.

5. Finally, the feeling of surrender and perhaps inner victory demonstrated in the lines “My silvery cord’s unanchored. An ocean of rapture now engulfs my Soul; I’m coming HOME once more.” More like a boat, each one of us is anchored to a fist. The fear of death which initial pesters the poet appears to be lifted and the feeling which he described as ‘An ocean of rapture’ engulfing his soul became more transient than persistence. The fullness of that feeling is seen in the last line “I am coming Home once more”.

Again, ‘once more’ depicts repeat which makes the homecoming appear more like a state of mind rather than death. Perhaps the poet had died many times in his imagination or carved a place for himself where his soul usually rest after a period of trouble. Whichever way, home is home; and it’s a place we rest from pain and struggles.

I find it more lovable to look the individual words, phrases, lines and stanzas but the beauty is in, and of the entire poem.

— Endurance AUF Noble

Stanza by Stanza Analysis of “Come, Sweet Death”

Now, for more intimacy with Manatita’s ‘come, sweet death’. let's take a closer look at each stanza.

Stanza 1
Come, sweet death,
Let us continue our game of hide and seek.
You veil thyself in winter’s night;
Come ablaze in the temple of the sun.
I yearn for a goblet of wine,
The taste of which will seize this breath,
Carrying a river of perennial joy to Jordan.

In line 1, the poet gave death a human attribute by inviting death to come for a hide and seek game, something much like inviting a friend to a play. It becomes much obvious the poet had played this game with death before looking at the word choice, 'continue'. “Come, sweet death, let us continue our game of hide and seek”. This, however, does not mean the normal hide and seek as we know; rather, it means that the poet lost loved one to death before and seeks to meet death face to face.

Sentence 2 lines 3 and 4, reveal that death comes at least expected times. The poet through those lines invites death to come in broad daylight in a physical body. The poet's invitation was never honored. That causes the poet to yearns for a goblet of wine to quench an excruciating pain. The need for a goblet of wine was engineered by the fact the enemy, death proved hard to handle.

The poet wished to wrestle death, a feeling which is common to most of us when death stings. The fact that the enemy, death is an invincible makes wrestling it impossible. The invincibility of death and its ability to strike at the unexpected time causes this poet pains. The pain is evident in the poet's desire for a goblet of wine; perhaps, he wishes to drown his pain.

Also, the feelings here are much like the feelings at times of terror attacks; when one desires to fight, yet, feels helpless because he can’t reach the enemies.

Stripped naked of all pretensions,

My travails with pain and sorrow,

Has worn my ego thin.

— Manatita Hutchinson

Stanza 2

Long have I traversed this stream of current,
Punched and battered by turbulent waves.
Stripped naked of all pretensions,
My travails with pain and sorrow,
Has worn my ego thin.
Now I rise in the darkness;
Give glory to fireflies and shooting stars.

The poet in stanza 2 finally admitted how he suffered the affliction of pain and sorrow because he lost a fight to the death. He can’t pretend anymore because he knew he can't fight the enemy death. He had earlier felt powerful, nursing the thought he could fight death but the repeated punches of death brought him to the realization and acceptance of his helplessness. Now, wean thin of his initial ego, the only thing he could do was to perhaps pace through the night, admiring the shooting stars and the fireflies.

This last two line is much like seeking solace from nature—a mean to overcome restiveness and the feeling of helplessness. The poet here demonstrates pain and sorrow can make us see ourselves the way we are rather than how we elusively perceived ourselves. Weak rather than strong!

Stanza 3

My mother sat in silence for three long years!
The frequent pendulums of her blood sugar,
Denied her internal organs,
The faintest glimmer of physical hope.
Yet she did her last dance with a failing heart;
Eyes shining at the portals of Paradise.

This stanza of the poem provides a vital clue to reasons why the poet suffers pain, and the actual cause of the demise the poet laments. Lines 2, 3 and 4 tell us the poet’s mother had diabetes which fluctuated up and down for years. The same lines tell the reason why the poet’s mother sits three long years in silence. That depicts pain and uncertainty.
There is a twist, however, not suggesting an improvement, but rather the poet’s mother doing something spectacular in spite of her health. The ‘dance’ as used by the poet does not appear to suggest the evidential 'dance' as we know it. It looks more like a concealing word for the act of dying. “Eyes shining at the portals of paradise” brings us closer to that meaning, perhaps the last battle for life.

Stanza 4

Come, sweet death!
On the Elysian lap of Love, I rise.
I hear the bugle blow, as the minstrels chant your glory.
I float on visionary memories for the bliss to come.
Come, sweet death!
My silvery cord’s unanchored.
An ocean of rapture now engulfs my Soul;
I’m coming HOME once more.

A greater part of this stanza of the poem was analyzed in number five of the overview. To avoid repetition, I refer you to read number five (No. 5) of the overview again.

Summarily, Manatita walked us through life’s dynamics and conflicting emotions that arose as a result of this dynamics. He displays an uncommon courage through his poem “Come Sweet Death”—the kind that is difficult to find.
My star lines of the poem are “My travails with pain and sorrow, has worn my ego thin.” Those lines are deep, powerful, and resonating. They appeared to tell my own story too.

Has life struggles and challenges worn our ego thin? Manatita offers us hope by showing us there is a home. Has life pain and sorrow weaned us of confidence and joy? Manatita tells us to take solace in a bliss of life to come.

Hope is one substance of substantial characteristics that we all need for our daily existence. We seek hope in our love; we seek hope in our jobs; we seek hope in our relationships; we seek hope in our academics; however, we only find patches of this hope here and there in those things where we seek it.

Manatita through this poem offers us the fullness of hopes in God. The kind of hope in which God transforms our souls beyond all forms of despairs.

Come, sweet death,

Come, sweet death,
Let us continue our game of hide and seek.
You veil thyself in winter’s night;
Come ablaze in the temple of the sun.
I yearn for a goblet of wine,
The taste of which will seize this breath,
Carrying a river of perennial joy to Jordan.

Long have I traversed this stream of current,
Punched and battered by turbulent waves.
Stripped naked of all pretensions,
My travails with pain and sorrow,
Has worn my ego thin.
Now I rise in the darkness;
Give glory to fireflies and shooting stars.

My mother sat in silence for three long years!
The frequent pendulums of her blood sugar,
Denied her internal organs,
The faintest glimmer of physical hope.
Yet she did her last dance with a failing heart;
Eyes shining at the portals of Paradise.

Come, sweet death!
On the Elysian lap of Love, I rise.
I hear the bugle blow, as the minstrels chant your glory.
I float on visionary memories for the bliss to come.
Come, sweet death!
My silvery cord’s unanchored.
An ocean of rapture now engulfs my Soul;
I’m coming HOME once more.

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    • Endy Noble profile image
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      Ajodo Endurance Uneojo 5 weeks ago from Lokoja, Nigeria.

      Thank you Manatita....

      Hope I was able to present your original thoughts well enough in my analysis? I actually love the poem because of its universal background, dynamics, and honesty in the presentation.

      The poem in itself has a charming content with magnetic expressions. The experience it represents is a humbling one and it tells the story of our common experiences.

      Thanks for the opportunity to examine your work.

    • manatita44 profile image

      manatita44 5 weeks ago from london

      You have done exceptionally well, especially with the positive bits ... the hope.

      Thank you so much for a cute and charming read. Tremendous appreciations! Respect! Gratitude ... much!

    • manatita44 profile image

      manatita44 5 weeks ago from london

      Wow! I'm so, so happy, bro.

      I'm going out but will read on the way. I bow to you a thousand times for taking up this difficult and sacred task. God bless you always. -Manatita

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