Rabindranath Tagore's "The Journey" - Owlcation - Education
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Rabindranath Tagore's "The Journey"

Poetry became my passion after I fell in love with Walter de la Mare's "Silver" in Mrs. Edna Pickett's sophomore English class circa 1962.

Rabindranath Tagore

Introduction and Text of "The Journey"

Rabindranath Tagore translated his collection of poems, Gitanjali, into English. He numbered each poem and rendered them into prose. However, they remain poetry of the highest order. Gitanjali's number 48 focuses on the spiritual "journey" of the speaker, even as at the outset, the fellows involved seem to be merely taking an ordinary hike. What happens to the speaker is truly astounding, as he realizes the true nature of the idea of a "journey."

In this poem, the term, “journey,” serves as an extended metaphor for “meditation” or following the spiritual path. The speaker takes his meditation seat and begins his search for union with the Divine. He engages in the extended metaphor to dramatically reveal his series of feelings on his metaphorical “journey.” While the source for the drama could credibly have been a literal trek across the country on the beautiful morning, the poem itself remains focused on the inner spiritual journey of the speaker.

The Journey

The morning sea of silence broke into ripples of bird songs;
and the flowers were all merry by the roadside;
and the wealth of gold was scattered through the rift of the clouds
while we busily went on our way and paid no heed.

We sang no glad songs nor played;
we went not to the village for barter;
we spoke not a word nor smiled;
we lingered not on the way.
We quickened our pace more and more as the time sped by.

The sun rose to the mid sky and doves cooed in the shade.
Withered leaves danced and whirled in the hot air of noon.
The shepherd boy drowsed and dreamed in the shadow of the banyan tree,
and I laid myself down by the water
and stretched my tired limbs on the grass.

My companions laughed at me in scorn;
they held their heads high and hurried on;
they never looked back nor rested;
they vanished in the distant blue haze.

They crossed many meadows and hills,
and passed through strange, far-away countries.
All honor to you, heroic host of the interminable path!
Mockery and reproach pricked me to rise,
but found no response in me.

I gave myself up for lost
in the depth of a glad humiliation
—in the shadow of a dim delight.

The repose of the sun-embroidered green gloom
slowly spread over my heart.
I forgot for what I had traveled,
and I surrendered my mind without struggle
to the maze of shadows and songs.

At last, when I woke from my slumber and opened my eyes,
I saw thee standing by me, flooding my sleep with thy smile.
How I had feared that the path was long and wearisome,
and the struggle to reach thee was hard!

Reading of "The Journey" from Gitanjali #48

Commentary

What happens to the speaker is truly astounding, as he realizes the true nature of the idea of a "journey."

First Movement: Beautiful Morning Landscape

The morning sea of silence broke into ripples of bird songs;
and the flowers were all merry by the roadside;
and the wealth of gold was scattered through the rift of the clouds
while we busily went on our way and paid no heed.

In the first movement, the speaker describes the beautiful morning landscape that surrounds him and his fellow travelers as they set out on their trek. The first line features an exquisite metaphor; the early "silence" is compared to a sea that breaks into "ripples of bird songs." As the birds are singing, the flowers by the pathway appear to be "all merry." The sky spreads out a golden glow that is "scattered through the rift of the clouds." The speaker then asserts that he and his fellow travelers are in a hurry to begin their hike, and they therefore do not notice nor appreciate the beauty that has already welcomed them.

Second Movement: Deadly Somber

We sang no glad songs nor played;
we went not to the village for barter;
we spoke not a word nor smiled;
we lingered not on the way.
We quickened our pace more and more as the time sped by.

The speaker then declares that he and his companions are quite serious in their travel experience; thus, "[w]e sang no glad songs nor played." They did not even bother to visit anymore, nor did they go, "to the village for barter." They were so deadly somber that they did not even bother to speak or smile. They did not dawdle anywhere. They were in such a great hurry that they "quickened [their] pace more and more as the time sped by."

Third Movement: Taking a Breather

The sun rose to the mid sky and doves cooed in the shade.
Withered leaves danced and whirled in the hot air of noon.
The shepherd boy drowsed and dreamed in the shadow of the banyan tree,
and I laid myself down by the water
and stretched my tired limbs on the grass.

By noon, the speaker is paying attention to the position of the sun, and he notes that doves are "coo[ing] in the shade." He notices that a shepherd boy is reclining in the shade of a tree. With the sun so hot and the doves and shepherd boy partaking of a relief from action, the speaker decides to stop his own trek; thus, he "laid [him]self down by the water / and stretched [his] tired limbs on the grass."

Fourth Movement: Suffering Ridicule

My companions laughed at me in scorn;
they held their heads high and hurried on;
they never looked back nor rested;
they vanished in the distant blue haze.

The speaker's travelmates taunt him for desiring to rest, and they continue on with their journey: "they held their heads high and hurried on; / they never looked back nor rested; / they vanished in the distant blue haze." The speaker, nevertheless, keeps his position with the intention of enjoying his rest as the others continue with their rushed pace.

Fifth Movement: Continuing To Be Lazy

They crossed many meadows and hills,
and passed through strange, far-away countries.
All honor to you, heroic host of the interminable path!
Mockery and reproach pricked me to rise,
but found no response in me.

The speaker observes that his fellows are continuing to march over "meadows and hills,"—not being lazy as he was. The speaker's fellow travelers continue to move "through strange, far-away countries." He gives them kudos for their venturesome nature, and he admits that he had experienced some guilt for remaining in leisure and not accompanying them, but he just could not spur himself on to continue on that particular journey.

The speaker then inserts a quiet bit of praise to honor the Creator, calling God "heroic host of the interminable path." He does this on behalf of himself and his fellows, who have kept their pace on this hike. Despite their different ways of worshiping their Creator, the speaker wishes to make it clear that he knows that both ways—his staying behind and meditating, and his fellows journeying on—lead ultimately to the same goal. The path remains "interminable" because of the nature of God as omniscient and omnipresent, and therefore eternal.

Sixth Movement: Ambiguity

I gave myself up for lost
in the depth of a glad humiliation
—in the shadow of a dim delight.

The speaker then testifies that he has ambiguous feelings: on the one hand, he feels "lost" because he is not with the crowd; but on the other hand, his possesses a "glad humiliation," and he feels that he must be standing "in the shadow of a dim delight."

Seventh Movement: Reconsidering Reason for the Trek

The repose of the sun-embroidered green gloom
slowly spread over my heart.
I forgot for what I had traveled,
and I surrendered my mind without struggle
to the maze of shadows and songs.

As the speaker continues to lounge about, he notices that sunset is "spread[ing] over his heart," unveiling for a second time his feelings of ambiguity: the gloom is "sun-embroidered," similar to the expression, "every cloud has a silver lining." The loafing speaker then confesses that he can no longer even recall why he set out on this trek in the first place, so he just lets himself go, no longer combating his true leanings any longer. He permits his mind and heart to go musing through, "the maze of shadows and songs."

Eighth Movement: Approaching the Door of the Divine

At last, when I woke from my slumber and opened my eyes,
I saw thee standing by me, flooding my sleep with thy smile.
How I had feared that the path was long and wearisome,
and the struggle to reach thee was hard!

At last, the speaker is awakened from his ambiguous stupor, and he realizes that he has found what he was looking for. He had feared that "the path was long and wearisome / and the struggle to reach [the Divine Beloved] was hard." But in the end, he has finally discovered that all he had to do was allow his inner self to approach the door of the Divine Beloved. All extraneous journeys become unnecessary in that exalted environment.

Questions & Answers

Question: What does the speaker wish to convey through the expression "green gloom" in the poem "Journey" by Rabindranath Tagore?

Answer: As the speaker continues to lounge about, he notices that sunset is unveiling for a second time his feelings of ambiguity: the "green gloom" is "sun-embroidered," similar to the expression, "every cloud has a silver lining."

Question: What did the speaker and his companions pay no heed to and why?

Answer: In the first movement, the speaker describes the beautiful morning landscape that surrounds him and his fellow travelers as they set out on their trek. The first line features an exquisite metaphor; the early "silence" is compared to a sea that breaks into "ripples of bird songs." As the birds are singing, the flowers by the pathway appear to be "all merry." The sky spreads out a golden glow that is "scattered through the rift of the clouds." The speaker then asserts that he and his fellow travelers are in a hurry to begin their hike, and they therefore do not notice nor appreciate the beauty that has already welcomed them.

Question: When did the speaker decide to stop his walking with the others?

Answer: By noon, the speaker is paying attention to the position of the sun, and he notes that doves are "coo[ing] in the shade." He notices that a shepherd boy is reclining in the shade of a tree. With the sun so hot and the doves and shepherd boy partaking of relief from the action, the speaker decides to stop his own trek; thus, he "laid [him]self down by the water / and stretched [his] tired limbs on the grass."

Question: Does Tagore’s “Journey” have any metaphors?

Answer: The first line features an exquisite metaphor; the early "silence" is compared to a sea that breaks into "ripples of bird songs."

Question: What is the theme in Tagore's "The Journey"?

Answer: The theme of Tagore's "The Journey" is the realization of the true nature of the spiritual journey.

Question: Why did the speaker's companions laugh at him?

Answer: The speaker's travel mates taunt him for desiring to rest, and they continue on with their journey: "they held their heads high and hurried on; / they never looked back nor rested; / they vanished in the distant blue haze." The speaker, nevertheless, keeps his position with the intention of enjoying his rest as the others continue with their rushed pace.

Question: In Tagore's "The Journey," why do his friends taunt him?

Answer: The speaker's friends and fellow travel mates taunt him for desiring to rest, and they continue on with their journey. The speaker, nevertheless, continues with enjoying his rest, while the others go on with their rushed pace.

Question: What does "slumber" mean metaphorically?

Answer: "Slumber" is sometimes used metaphorically to indicate death, but it is used literally in this poem; thus, it merely means "sleep."

Question: How does the speaker in Tagore's "The Journey" describe his own reactions here?

Answer: In Tagore's "The Journey," the speaker engages an extended metaphor to dramatically reveal his series of feelings on his metaphorical “journey.” While the source for the drama could credibly have been a literal trek across the country on a beautiful morning, the poem itself remains focused on the inner spiritual journey of the speaker.

Question: Explain why the speaker ultimately leaves behind his trepidation at not continuing on with the fellow trekkers?

Answer: As the speaker continues to lounge about, he notices that sunset is "spread[ing] over his heart," unveiling for a second time his feelings of ambiguity: the gloom is "sun-embroidered," similar to the expression, "every cloud has a silver lining." The loafing speaker then confesses that he can no longer even recall why he set out on this trek in the first place, so he just lets himself go, no longer combating his true leanings any longer. He permits his mind and heart to go musing through, "the maze of shadows and songs."

Question: In Tagore's "The Journey, " why did the speaker give himself up for lost?

Answer: The speaker is not literally "lost." He is testifying that he has ambiguous feelings: on the one hand, he feels "lost" because he is not with the crowd; but on the other hand, his possesses a "glad humiliation," and he feels that he must be standing "in the shadow of a dim delight."

Question: What kind of activities did the speaker not indulge in?

Answer: In Tagore's "The Journey," the speaker stops to rest from his hike and remains resting for the balance of the poem; thus, he does not continue to engage in the hike by walking.

Question: Explain the use of the expression 'interminable past'?

Answer: Tagore's "The Journey" contains the line, "All honor to you, heroic host of the interminable path!" The line shows the speaker giving his companions kudos for continuing on; he is saying that they are honoring God in their own way. Please note that you have misquoted the phrase "interminable path."

Question: In Tagore's poem, "The Journey," what is the speaker doing?

Answer: The speaker starts out on a hike with a group of his friends; he decides to rest while the other continues on. The speaker then muses on his environs and various life questions as he continues to relax and muse.

Question: In Tagore's "The Journey", what does the poet and his companions pay no heed and why?

Answer: The speaker asserts that he and his fellow travelers are in a hurry to begin their hike, and they, therefore, do not notice nor appreciate the beauty that has already welcomed them.

Question: What did the speaker's companions pay no heed to and why?

Answer: The speaker asserts that he and his fellow travelers are in a hurry to begin their hike, and they, therefore, do not notice nor appreciate the beauty of the morning that has already welcomed them.

Question: What are some of the aspects of nature that the speaker and his companions ignored in Tagore's "The Journey"?

Answer: In Tagore's "The Journey," as the birds are singing, the flowers by the pathway appear to be "all merry." The sky spreads out a golden glow that is "scattered through the rift of the clouds." The speaker asserts that he and his fellow travelers are in a hurry to begin their hike, and they therefore do not notice nor appreciate the beauty that has already welcomed them.

Question: What did the speaker and his companions pay no heed to and why ?

Answer: The speaker begins by describing the beautiful morning landscape that surrounds him and his friends as they set out on their hike. The first line features an exquisite metaphor; the early "silence" is compared to a sea that breaks into "ripples of bird songs." As the birds are singing, the flowers by the pathway appear to be "all merry." The sky spreads out a golden glow that is "scattered through the rift of the clouds." The speaker then asserts that he and his fellow travelers are in a hurry to begin their hike, and they, therefore, do not notice nor appreciate the beauty that has already welcomed them.

Question: What kind of activities did the speaker of Tagore's "The Journey" do?

Answer: The speaker is engaged in only one "activity": meditation.

Question: What is the nature of the exceptional journey taken in Tagore's poem, "Journey"?

Answer: In this poem, the term, “journey,” serves as an extended metaphor for “meditation.” The speaker takes his meditation seat and begins his search for union with the Divine. He engages in the extended metaphor to dramatically reveal his series of feelings on his metaphorical “journey.” While the source for the drama could credibly have been a literal trek across the country on the beautiful morning, the poem itself remains focused on the inner spiritual journey of the speaker.

Question: In the first movement of "The Journey," what is happening?

Answer: In the first movement, the speaker describes the beautiful morning landscape that surrounds him and his fellow travelers as they set out on their trek. The first line features an exquisite metaphor; the early "silence" is compared to a sea that breaks into "ripples of bird songs." As the birds are singing, the flowers by the pathway appear to be "all merry." The sky spreads out a golden glow that is "scattered through the rift of the clouds." The speaker then asserts that he and his fellow travelers are in a hurry to begin their hike, and they, therefore, do not notice nor appreciate the beauty that has already welcomed them.

Question: Does the speaker feel guilty about remaining behind from his friends?

Answer: The speaker admits that he has ambiguous feelings: on the one hand, he feels "lost" because he is not with the crowd; but on the other hand, his possesses a "glad humiliation," and he feels that he must be standing "in the shadow of a dim delight."

Question: What does the speaker come to realize about his journey?

Answer: In Tagore's "The Journey," the speaker ultimately realizes the true nature of the idea of a "journey," a metaphor for the path to soul realization.

Question: Is Tagore's "Journey" a narrative poem or a lyric?

Answer: It's lyric.

Question: What does slumber mean metaphorically?

Answer: "Slumber" or "sleep" is sometimes used metaphorically for death; however, in Tagore's "The Journey" "slumber" is used literally not metaphorically.

Question: To what does the speaker's mind surrender and is the surrender of the mind a sign of inner weakness?

Answer: The speaker surrenders his mind to God-realization. The goal of the speaker is to unite his mind and soul with his Divine Creator or God. Thus, the continued pursuit of his goal reveals an inner strength of greatest importance because the ultimate, true purpose of living life as an unrealized human being is to realize one's inner divinity.

Question: How does the speaker suffer ridicule?

Answer: The speaker's hiking companions taunt him for resting, and they continue on with their hike. The speaker, however, keeps his position with the intention of enjoying his rest as the others continue with their rushed pace.

Question: Mention the myriad aspects of nature that the poet and his friends ignored?

Answer: In the first movement, the speaker describes the beautiful morning landscape that surrounds him and his fellow travelers as they set out on their trek. The first line features an exquisite metaphor; the early "silence" is compared to a sea that breaks into "ripples of bird songs." As the birds are singing, the flowers by the pathway appear to be "all merry." The sky spreads out a golden glow that is "scattered through the rift of the clouds." The speaker then asserts that he and his fellow travelers are in a hurry to begin their hike, and they, therefore, do not notice nor appreciate the beauty that has already welcomed them.

Question: How were the speaker and his friends "deadly somber"?

Answer: The speaker and his companions are quite serious in their travel experience; thus, "[they] sang no glad songs nor played." They did not even bother to visit anymore, nor did they go, "to the village for barter." They were so deadly somber that they did not even bother to speak or smile. They did not dawdle anywhere. They were in such a great hurry that they "quickened [their] pace more and more as the time sped by."

Question: Is this the same Tagore who won a Nobel Prize?

Answer: Yes, in 1913, and he won it for his collection, Gitanjali, in which this poem "The Journey" appears.

Question: What is the difference between a movement and a stanza?

Answer: A stanza is a physical unit of lines in the poem; a movement is a group of lines that adhere thematically or some other way. Sometimes movements move along exactly with each stanza; other times movements may cross over to the next stanza.

Question: Who translated Tagore's poems in "Gitanjali"?

Answer: Rabindranath Tagore translated his collection of poems, "Gitanjali," from the original Bengali into English, with a little help from William Butler Yeats.

Question: In Rabin Tagore's "The Journey", in the first movement, what aspects of nature does the speaker refer to?

Answer: In the first movement, the speaker describes the beautiful morning landscape that surrounds him and his fellow travelers as they set out on their trek. The first line features an exquisite metaphor; the early "silence" is compared to a sea that breaks into "ripples of bird songs." As the birds are singing, the flowers by the pathway appear to be "all merry." The sky spreads out a golden glow that is "scattered through the rift of the clouds." The speaker then asserts that he and his fellow travelers are in a hurry to begin their hike, and they, therefore, do not notice nor appreciate the beauty that has already welcomed them.

Question: How does the speaker feel about his friends continuing their trek?

Answer: The speaker gives his friend kudos for their venturesome nature, and he admits that he had experienced some guilt for remaining in leisure and not accompanying them, but he just could not spur himself on to continue on that particular journey.

Question: Who is being referred to as "heroic host" and why?

Answer: The speaker is calling the Divine Creator or God "heroic host of the interminable path." He does this on behalf of himself and his fellows, who have kept their pace on this hike. Despite their different ways of worshiping their Creator, the speaker wishes to make it clear that he knows that both ways—his staying behind and meditating, and his fellows journeying on—leading ultimately to the same goal. The path remains "interminable" because of the nature of God as omniscient and omnipresent, and therefore eternal.

Question: What does the speaker of Tagore's poem express in the sixth movement?

Answer: In the sixth movement, the speaker testifies that he has ambiguous feelings: on the one hand, he feels "lost" because he is not with the crowd; but on the other hand, his possesses a "glad humiliation," and he feels that he must be standing "in the shadow of a dim delight."

Question: What is a major literary device used in Rabindranath Tagore's "The Journey"?

Answer: In Rabindranath Tagore's "The Journey," the term, “journey,” serves as an extended metaphor for “meditation” or following the spiritual path.

Question: In Tagore's "The Journey," what did the speaker and his companions pay no heed to? Why?

Answer: They did not notice the natural beauty around them because they were in a hurry to begin their hike.

Question: Please explain the use of extended metaphor in Tagore's "The Journey"?

Answer: In this poem, the term, “journey,” serves as an extended metaphor for “meditation” or following the spiritual path. The speaker takes his meditation seat and begins his search for union with the Divine. He engages in the extended metaphor to dramatically reveal his series of feelings on his metaphorical “journey.” While the source for the drama could credibly have been a literal trek across the country on the beautiful morning, the poem itself remains focused on the inner spiritual journey of the speaker.

Question: Why did the speaker and his friends pay no attention to their surroundings in Tagore's poem "The Journey"?

Answer: The speaker explains that he and his fellow travelers are in a hurry to begin their hike: thus, they do not notice nor appreciate the beauty that has already welcomed them.

Question: In Tagore's poem "The Journey," why does the speaker become lazy?

Answer: The speaker observes that his fellows are continuing to march over "meadows and hills,"—not being lazy as he was. The speaker's fellow travelers continue to move "through strange, far-away countries." He gives them kudos for their venturesome nature, and he admits that he had experienced some guilt for remaining in leisure and not accompanying them, but he just could not spur himself to continue on that particular journey.

Question: Does this poem belong to the classification of poetry known as a "hero" or epic poetry?

Answer: No, it does not. Tagore's "Journey" is a lyric poem that sings the praises of his inner spiritual journey to God-union.

Question: What did the speaker see after he "woke" from "[his] slumber"?

Answer: After the speaker is awakened from his ambiguous stupor, he realizes that he has found what he was looking for. He had feared that "the path was long and wearisome / and the struggle to reach [the Divine Beloved] was hard." But in the end, he has finally discovered that all he had to do was allow his inner self to approach the door of the Divine Beloved. All extraneous journeys become unnecessary in that exalted environment.

Question: What kind of activities did the speaker not indulge in ?

Answer: The speaker did not continue on the hike with his companions.

Question: How does the speaker feel after he rethinks his decision to rest from the hike?

Answer: In the final analysis, the speaker is awakened from his ambiguous stupor, and he realizes that he has found what he was looking for. He had feared that "the path was long and wearisome / and the struggle to reach [the Divine Beloved] was hard." But in the end, he has finally discovered that all he had to do was allow his inner self to approach the door of the Divine Beloved. All extraneous journeys become unnecessary in that exalted environment.

© 2015 Linda Sue Grimes

Comments

Linda Sue Grimes (author) from U.S.A. on February 17, 2020:

Thank you for your kind words, Umesh Chandra Bhatt!

Tagore's works are always inspirational, deserving a close reading. His collection, Gitanjali, won for him earn the 1913 Nobel in Literature Prize. Western and Eastern readers alike enjoy this fine poet/craftsman's works. Many of his hymns have been rendered as chants for meditation. The world's literary output is fuller and richer because of the creations of this divinely inspired poet/thinker.

Umesh Chandra Bhatt from Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, India on February 16, 2020:

Nice explanation of one of the famous poems of Tagore.

Linda Sue Grimes (author) from U.S.A. on October 22, 2018:

gyanendra mocktan,

Thank you for the kind words. I wish you all the best. Blessings and continued success in all you do!

Sincerely,

lsg

gyanendra mocktan on October 22, 2018:

Linda Sue Grimes:

I am grateful to you for your treasures here. I will make a point every day that I am going to do what you have advised me here.

Thank you.

Linda Sue Grimes (author) from U.S.A. on October 21, 2018:

gyanendra mocktan:

As you keep practicing, reading, and writing, your fluency and facility with the language will continue to improve. Your words will learn to follow your heart. You have a fine master in Tagore! Have a blessed day!

gyanendra mocktan on October 21, 2018:

Linda Sue Grimes, Thank you for our compassionate response here. In your article, I not only went through the poems, importantly, I glided through your words. The way explain is so lucid.

I have the book Gitanjali with me. I sing This is my prayer to Thee my Lord, Strike, Strike, Strike at the penury of my heart.

Will I be able to describe it in your way? That is the biggest challenge for me.

Thank you

Linda Sue Grimes (author) from U.S.A. on October 21, 2018:

Thank you, gyanendra mocktan!

Rabindranath Tagore's poems are always inspiring and deserve much close reading. His Gitanjali was responsible for helping him earn the 1913 Nobel in Literature Prize. Both Western and Eastern readers appreciate this marvelous craftsman's works. And many of his hymns have been employed as chants used in meditation. Our world literary canon is much richer because of this divinely inspired poet and thinker.

gyanendra mocktan on October 21, 2018:

Linda Sue Grimes, thank you for your gentle tough with Tagore's poem. In fact, our life also seems to be of the same kind. Thank you/

Linda Sue Grimes (author) from U.S.A. on August 15, 2018:

Thank you, Tijani! Tagore's works are always worth close study, and they always offer a marvelous inspirational journey. He certainly deserved to win the 1913 Nobel in Literature Prize. Western culture is richer for having known and appreciated this fine craftsman.

Tijani Achamlal from Morocco on August 14, 2018:

Very interesting.Thanks for sharing.

Linda Sue Grimes (author) from U.S.A. on May 28, 2018:

Thank you, Shubhda Ahlawat. Tagore's work is always a pleasure to read, with beautiful mages that uplift and inspire. He remains one of the most famous Indian writers of all time. And he was also an educator who founded his own school. He was a true Renaissance man, achieving excellence in many different areas of thought and endeavor.

Shubhda Ahlawat from India on May 28, 2018:

that's an amazing insight.

Linda Sue Grimes (author) from U.S.A. on May 04, 2018:

Thank you, Sean. Tagore's work always offers a pleasurable read that enlightens as well as entertains. He remains one of my favorite poets, and his life work in education is inspiring also.

Ioannis Arvanitis from Greece, Almyros on May 04, 2018:

Excellent work, dear Linda! Your approach shows a noble Heart!

Thank you so much for this gift!

Gratitude!

Sean

Linda Sue Grimes (author) from U.S.A. on March 21, 2018:

Best of luck with your exams, Labdheekumari from India! You are blessed to be studying Tagore.

Labdheekumari from India on March 20, 2018:

Mam it is in my book. N I am having my exams today. So your explanation is very precious for me. Thanks a lot.

N about Rabindranath Tagore, he is composer of our national enthem, he was incredible......

Linda Sue Grimes (author) from U.S.A. on March 19, 2018:

In 1913 when the prize was still prestigious, Rabindranath Tagore earned the Nobel Prize for Literature for his collection titled Gitanjali, which he translated into English prose paragraphs. His poems are always spiritually uplifting. He was a great poet, skilled craftsman, and deep thinker.

Thank you for your response, Labdheekumari!

Labdheekumari on March 19, 2018:

Best explanation ever!

Linda Sue Grimes (author) from U.S.A. on August 18, 2017:

Thank you, Xyz. Glad you found the hub useful.

Blessings for the day!

--lsg

Xyz on August 18, 2017:

Excellent explanation

Linda Sue Grimes (author) from U.S.A. on May 28, 2017:

It is always an inspiration to read, study, and comment on the works of Tagore. He was an amazing thinker and craftsman of fascinating, endearing, and enduring poetry.

Tagore was awarded the Nobel Prize inLiterature in 1913, back when that award had credibility and prestige.

Thank you for your comment, Ra. Have a blessed day!

Ra, on May 28, 2017:

Beautifull explanation

Linda Sue Grimes (author) from U.S.A. on March 21, 2017:

Thank you for the comment, Debangee.

Yes, Tagore is a truly great artist, who has uplifted and inspired many readers for many years. He earned the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1913 back when that prize was truly prestigious.

DEBANGEE MANDAL from India on March 21, 2017:

Rabindranath Tagore is an inspiration himself.. thanks for the article