Rudyard Kipling's "Helen All Alone"

Updated on October 8, 2018
Maya Shedd Temple profile image

After I fell in love with Walter de la Mare's "Silver" in Mrs. Edna Pickett's sophomore English class, circa 1962, poetry became my passion.

Rudyard Kipling

Source

Introduction and Text of "Helen All Alone"

Rudyard Kipling's " Helen All Alone" consists of four stanzas with eight rimed lines and a final stanza with nine lines. His allusion to Helen works to personify the concept of temptation.

(Please note: The spelling, "rhyme," was introduced into English by Dr. Samuel Johnson through an etymological error. For my explanation for using only the original form, please see "Rime vs Rhyme: An Unfortunate Error.")

Helen All Alone

There was darkness under Heaven
For an hour’s space—
Darkness that we knew was given
Us for special grace.
Sun and moon and stars were hid,
God had left His Throne,
When Helen came to me, she did,
Helen all alone!

Side by side (because our fate
Damned us ere our birth)
We stole out of Limbo Gate
Looking for the Earth.
Hand in pulling hand amid
Fear no dreams have known,
Helen ran with me, she did,
Helen all alone!

When the Horror passing speech
Hunted us along,
Each laid hold on each, and each
Found the other strong.
In the teeth of Things forbid
And Reason overthrown,
Helen stood by me, she did,
Helen all alone!

When, at last, we heard those Fires
Dull and die away,
When, at last, our linked desires
Dragged us up to day;
When, at last, our souls were rid
Of what that Night had shown,
Helen passed from me, she did,
Helen all alone!

Let her go and find a mate,
As I will find a bride,
Knowing naught of Limbo Gate
Or Who are penned inside.
There is knowledge God forbid
More than one should own.
So Helen went from me, she did,
Oh my soul, be glad she did!
Helen all alone!

Reading of "Helen All Alone"

Commentary

The speaker in the Kipling's "Helen All Alone" is addressing the issue of temptation, and he professes relief at the end that he did not give in to it.

First Stanza: A State of Melancholy

There was darkness under Heaven
For an hour’s space—
Darkness that we knew was given
Us for special grace.
Sun and moon and stars were hid,
God had left His Throne,
When Helen came to me, she did,
Helen all alone!

The first stanza finds the speaker describing his state of the melancholy, a mental condition that causes the human mind to become stressed and then urges the person to behave against his own best interest. The speaker names his particular temptation, "Helen," alluding to the beautiful mythological character, who is reputed to have brought on the Trojan War, after she fled from her husband Menelaus with the handsome warrior Paris.

The speaker paints a scene of darkness with "Sun and moon and stars" hidden and claims that "God has left His Throne." In darkness without the presence of God, the human heart becomes open to unwholesome desires. In this state of mind, "Helen" or temptation comes to him. Each stanza's last line sums up Helen's relationship to the speaker, both spatially and emotionally.

Second Stanza: Escaping Nihilism

Side by side (because our fate
Damned us ere our birth)
We stole out of Limbo Gate
Looking for the Earth.
Hand in pulling hand amid
Fear no dreams have known,
Helen ran with me, she did,
Helen all alone!

After Helen appears, the two hand in hand try to escape that forgotten land between heaven and earth. They run toward earth furiously seeking to escape their nihilistic state of existence. They run "Hand in pulling hand amid / Fear no dreams have known." Their fate had "damned" them to be placed in Limbo even before their birth. But together they try to pull ahead of their fears "Looking for Earth" or a place where they can inhabit bodies in order to experience a sensuous existence.

Third Stanza: Determining Behavior

When the Horror passing speech
Hunted us along,
Each laid hold on each, and each
Found the other strong.
In the teeth of Things forbid
And Reason overthrown,
Helen stood by me, she did,
Helen all alone!

The two encounter "Horror passing speech" which motivates them to hold to each other. This out-of-body experience seems quite similar to in-body experience: "In the teeth of Things forbid / And Reason overthrown." They are aware that there are some things they should not do. They also perceive that they cannot always reason or understand exactly what those things are.

Fourth Stanza: The Return of Clear Thought

When, at last, we heard those Fires
Dull and die away,
When, at last, our linked desires
Dragged us up to day;
When, at last, our souls were rid
Of what that Night had shown,
Helen passed from me, she did,
Helen all alone!

In the fourth stanza, the speaker and Helen "hear those Fires / Dull and die away." And now it is becoming daylight or clear thought is returning. And they are "rid / Of what that Night had shown." They had passed through the turbulence of temptation.

Fifth Stanza: Overcoming Temptation

Let her go and find a mate,
As I will find a bride,
Knowing naught of Limbo Gate
Or Who are penned inside.
There is knowledge God forbid
More than one should own.
So Helen went from me, she did,
Oh my soul, be glad she did!
Helen all alone!

The speaker realizes that Helen would not have been a fit mate for him nor he for her. His temptation brought on by melancholy of night has lifted as Helen has passed out of his sight. He can leave the notion of Limbo behind him and not be concerned with those remaining there, nor the temptations with which man is tormented.

The speaker avers that, "There is knowledge God forbid." And he knows now that the illusion in the form of the Hellenic temptation is "More than one should own." He is lucky that he was able to overcome, for he knows that many who remain behind "Limbo Gate" have not been so lucky. So as Helen goes from him, the speaker does not despair but instead celebrates: "So Helen went from me, she did, / Oh, my soul, be glad she did!" He realizes that he has dodged the bullet, and he breathes his well-earned sigh of relief.

Rudyard Kipling

Source

Life Sketch of Rudyard Kipling

Joseph Rudyard Kipling was born December 30, 1865, in Mumbai, India (at that time the city went by the appellation "Bombay"). Kipling's father, John Lockwood Kipling, was a professor of architectural sculpture at the Bombay School of Art, and his mother Alice MacDonald Kipling was a poet. At age 6, the young Kipling was sent back to England to be educated. He returned to India in 1882.

Rudyard Kipling worked as a journalist and ventured into the creative writing of poetry and fiction. His Plain Tales from the Hills, published in 1888 gained him a following in England, and in 1889, he returned to England to live in London.

Kipling married an American, Caroline Balestier, in 1892, and the couple relocated to Brattleboro, Vermont, in the USA, where Caroline's family resided. The couple had two daughters, Josephine (1893) and Elsie (1896); the next year, while living in Rottingdean in Sussex, England, Caroline gave birth to their third child, a son named John, a war hero, who on September 27, 1915, was pronounced missing in action in northern France during the Battle of Loos.

By the late 1890s Kipling's fame had spread and he was considered a very popular writer of both children's and adult literature. He wrote his Just So Stories for his elder daughter, Josephine, who died from pneumonia at the age of six years. Other wildly famous works at the time include Stalky and Co. (1899), Kim (1901), perhaps his most noted work, and Puck of Pook's Hill (1906).

Kipling is often referred to as a British poet laureate, but he turned down that honor as well as the knighthood when they were offer to him in 1907. He did accept the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1907; he was the first English writer to be awarded that honor.

The Kiplings moved into a 17th century home in East Sussex in 1902, and they lived there for the rest of their lives. Kipling continued to travel extensively, including many journeys back to India and trips to South Africa, where he spent time during the winter months.

After his son went missing in 1915 while serving in the Irish Guards, Kipling wrote a history of the regiment titled, "The Irish Guards in the Great War." John Kipling had originally been declared unfit for military service because of his acute myopia, but the young lad desired so strongly to serve that his father interceded to help enter his son into the Guards. Kipling searched for many years trying to find his son's remains, which were finally identified nearly a century after the soldier went missing.

Kipling was greatly affected by the MIA of his son; in addition to engaging many searches for the young soldier's remains, the father joined the Imperial War Graves Commission and was responsible for selecting inscriptions for memorials, for example, "Their Name Liveth For Evermore." He worked with Winston Churchill to have all war memorials of equal size despite the rank of the soldier.

Rudyard Kipling spent his last years in poor health, suffering from a severe ulcer, from which he died on January 18, 1936. His ashes are interred in Westminster Abbey in Poets' Corner next to the graves of poet and novelist Thomas Hardy and novelist, author of the widely famous A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens.

Kipling's Reputation

Despite his wide-spread fame, Rudyard Kipling's reputation started to take hits in the 1890s. Although Kipling was a genuine talent as a writer and a thinker, his reputation continued to decline when notable personalities such as Oscar Wilde, George Orwell, and the stunningly disreputable Edward Said began to express their depraved evaluations of Kipling.

Oscar Wilde framed his jejune opinion this way: "As one turns over the pages of his Plain Tales from the Hills, one feels as if one were seated under a palm-tree, reading life by superb flashes of vulgarity."

George Orwell in 1942 offered the ludicrous remark that "during five literary generations every enlightened person has despised him" as "morally insensitive and aesthetically disgusting."

According to the disingenuous fraud, Edward Said, "Kipling could not imagine an India in historical flux out of British control." About this idiotic remark, Sam Joridson has correctly quipped, "Kipling can be accused of many things, but I’d say a lack of imagination is not one of them."

But from these statements a generalized, vague, false view of Rudyard Kipling has gripped Western culture, from the media, who never encounter a left-wing accusation of racism, it cannot embrace, to the professorate, about whom the same characterization remains relevant.

Rescuing and Rehabilitating

T. S. Eliot remarked about Kipling, " . . . it is impossible to belittle Kipling." But Eliot's critical essays about Kipling hinge on making a distention between Kipling's fiction, for which Eliot considers Kipling a master and Kipling's poetry, for which Eliot considers the novelist less masterful. Thus Eliot's attempt to rehabilitate Kipling went only so far, and likely had little effect of the ilk that continued to label Kipling a racist and a misogynist.

Among those currently who are attempting to restore Rudyard Kipling to his rightful place in the literary world as a writer and political thinker is David Gilmour whose biography, The Long Recessional, offers analyses that serve to take the sting out of many the barbs lobbed against Kipling over the decades. According to John Gross, whose review appears in The Telegraph, "you close The Long Recessional with enhanced respect for Kipling, especially after reading the closing pages. He saw the threat of Hitler from the first. His last years — he died in 1936 — were overshadowed by his premonition of the conflict to come, and in the Second World War, as Gilmour justly claims, he had his posthumous vindication."

The brilliant critic and editor of The New Criterion, Roger Kimball, credits a zeitgeist shift with the "de-claw[ing] and domesticat[ing of] Rudyard Kipling, that gradually diminished that brusque and imposing giant to an entertaining homunculus." Kimball says, "Kipling’s politics suddenly became a popular as well as an elite embarrassment."

That Rudyard Kipling had been a widely read author presented a problem for those whose political leanings had shifted with that zeitgeist. Having committed to memory Kipling's many memorable lines, quoters engaged a level of disingenuousness that can only be labeled shameful. For example, as Kimball explains,

It got to the point where people who had absorbed Kipling unwittingly suppressed his authorship. Orwell notes that Middleton Murry, quoting Kipling’s famous lines "There are nine and sixty ways / Of constructing tribal lays," mistakenly attributed them to Thackeray. Kipling might have written good poetry, but it wasn’t good for poetry to have been written by Kipling. Sanitizing Kipling, segregating his political and social opinions from his literary accomplishment, has had the unfortunate effect of diminishing the appreciation or even the knowledge of that accomplishment.

Roger Kimball's elucidating essay, "Rudyard Kipling unburdened," appearing in April 2008 in The New Criterion, can be considered one of the most comprehensive pieces to rehabilitate the reputation of Rudyard Kipling. Kimball debunks the often misunderstood lines that have served to tarnish Kipling's reputation. For example, the line with the phrase, "lesser breeds," offered fodder for the politically correct to munch on for decades. "Lesser breeds" appears in Kipling's poem, "Recessional," an occasional poem written for Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee:

If, drunk with sight of power, we loose

Wild tongues that have not Thee in awe—
Such boasting as the Gentiles use

Or lesser breeds without the Law—
Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet,
Lest we forget — lest we forget!

About the misunderstanding of these lines, Kimball explains,

As Orwell noted, the line about "lesser breeds" "is always good for a snigger in pansy-left circles." But it doesn’t refer, as Orwell also noted, to "coolies" being kicked about "by pukka sahib in a pith helmet" but rather to the awe-less multitudes "without the Law," Germans, first of all, but also anyone who glorified power without restraint or obeisance.

Another set of lines that cause the "pansy-left" to cringe is the one containing the currently offensive reference to "white": "Take up the White Man’s burden—/ And reap his old reward: / The blame of those ye better, / The hate of those ye guard—." But again, the term "white" does not refer to skin color, or to finite imperialists; it refers to "civilization" of "those who conduct themselves within the Law for the good of others"; thus "Gunga Din may have a ‘dirty’ hide, but he is ‘white, clear white, inside.'"

It is certainly sad and shameful that a set of events, including misunderstandings real or concocted, may be allowed to tarnish a good man's reputation, whether it be a writer a century or two ago or a Supreme Court nominee in present day America. Nevertheless, the "pansy-left circles" will always be with us, and as Evelyn Waugh, elucidated:

Kipling believed civilization to be something laboriously achieved which was only precariously defended. He wanted to see the defenses fully manned and he hated the liberals because he thought them gullible and feeble, believing in the easy perfectibility of man and ready to abandon the work of centuries for sentimental qualms.

Waugh's description of the "liberals" remains in place, as comedian and pundit Evan Sayet has so accurately and thoroughly elucidated. And it remains to be seen whether the Kipling reputation can ever be restored to its original luster. One can hope that those reading his works today can at least take the time to learn some history, even if they have no capacity for getting its meaning right.

As Andrew Roberts has asserted in his review of Gilmour's The Long Recessional, "The abuse of Kipling has been long and sustained, yet his works might prove our ideal cultural reference for the next stages of the war against terror: he warned that imperialists could only expect 'the blame of those ye better, / The hate of those ye guard'."

Sources

Questions & Answers

    © 2016 Linda Sue Grimes

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