Shakespeare Sonnet 131: "Thou art as tyrannous, so as thou art" - Owlcation - Education
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Shakespeare Sonnet 131: "Thou art as tyrannous, so as thou art"

Poetry became my passion after I fell in love with Walter de la Mare's "Silver" in Mrs. Edna Pickett's sophomore English class circa 1962.

Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford  - The real "Shakespeare"

Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford - The real "Shakespeare"

Introduction and Text of Sonnet 131: "Thou art as tyrannous, so as thou art"

From the classic Shakespeare 154-sonnet sequence, the speaker in sonnet 131 addresses the persona that is responsible for this group of sonnets (127-154) being labeled "the dark lady sonnets." Clearly, the speaker is addressing a person who has a "face" and a "neck," unlike the supposed "young man sonnets" (18-126), which never offer any evidence of referring to a human being.

The "Dark Lady" sequence focuses on a woman as it continues to maintain an ambiguity as to whether the "dark" refers to her coloring—complexion, hair, eyes— or only to her behavior. The speaker does seem to reveal that she is on the darker complexioned side of the spectrum, but also that she is quite a stunning beauty whose swarthiness adds considerably to her beauty. He implies that she is as beautiful or perhaps more lovely than the standard fair-haired beauty that seems to be the popular yardstick for feminine beauty at that period of time.

Thou art as tyrannous, so as thou art

Thou art as tyrannous, so as thou art
As those whose beauties proudly make them cruel;
For well thou know’st to my dear doting heart
Thou art the fairest and most precious jewel.
Yet, in good faith, some say that thee behold,
Thy face hath not the power to make love groan:
To say they err I dare not be so bold,
Although I swear it to myself alone.
And to be sure that is not false I swear,
A thousand groans, but thinking on thy face,
One on another’s neck, do witness bear
Thy black is fairest in my judgment’s place.
In nothing art thou black save in thy deeds,
And thence this slander, as I think, proceeds.

Reading of Sonnet 131

Commentary

Even as he defends her physical beauty, the beguiled speaker in sonnet 131 introduces the notion of the ugly "deeds" of which the dark lady persona proves capable.

First Quatrain: Beautiful but Cruel

Thou art as tyrannous, so as thou art
As those whose beauties proudly make them cruel;
For well thou know’st to my dear doting heart
Thou art the fairest and most precious jewel.

In the first quatrain, the speaker accuses the lady of tyrannical behavior that resembles that of those beautiful women who become cruel because of their beauty. She thinks she has the upper hand in the relationship, because she knows that he is captivated by her beauty and holds her in high regard.

The speaker admits that he has a "doting heart" and that to him she is "the fairest and most precious jewel." Such a position leaves him weak and vulnerable, making him accept her cruel behavior out of fear of losing her. Because she is aware of his vulnerability, she is free to cause him pain with impunity.

Second Quatrain: Conflicted by Beauty

Yet, in good faith, some say that thee behold,
Thy face hath not the power to make love groan:
To say they err I dare not be so bold,
Although I swear it to myself alone.

Even though the speaker has heard other people say that there is nothing special and particularly beautiful about this woman, he continues to think otherwise. He has hard people say that she does not have "the power to make love groan." According to others, she is incapable of motivating the kind of reaction that other really beautiful woman may engender.

And the speaker does not have the courage to argue with those who hold those negative opinions. Yet even though he will not rebut those complaints to the faces of those who hold them, he "swear[s]" to himself that they are wrong and thus continues to hold his own view as the correct one.

Third Quatrain: Intrigued by Coloring

And to be sure that is not false I swear,
A thousand groans, but thinking on thy face,
One on another’s neck, do witness bear
Thy black is fairest in my judgment’s place.

To convince himself that he is right in thinking his lady a beauty, he insists that when thinking of "[her] face," he may groan with love a thousand times. He refers to her blackness as the "fairest in [his] judgment’s place."

The speaker holds the dark features of the "dark lady" in highest regard, despite the prevailing standard of beauty reflected in the opinions of other people who criticize her negatively. As he compares the complexion and hair of lighter skinned women to his "dark lady," he finds that he remains more intrigued by her coloring.

The Couplet: Beauty Is as Beauty Does

In nothing art thou black save in thy deeds,
And thence this slander, as I think, proceeds.

The speaker then asserts that any negativity associated with blackness results only from the woman’s behavior. Her physical beauty does not contrast in the negative to blondes and other fair-haired women, but her callous and indifferent behavior renders her deserving to the "slander" she is receiving. He will not uphold the ugliness of her deeds, even though he is attracted to her natural, dark beauty.

The real ''Shakespeare"

The De Vere Society is  dedicated to the proposition that the works of Shakespeare were written by Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford

The De Vere Society is dedicated to the proposition that the works of Shakespeare were written by Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford

Shakespeare Identified Lecture, Mike A'Dair And William J. Ray

© 2017 Linda Sue Grimes

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