What Is Subordinationism?

Updated on August 24, 2018
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B. A. Johnson is an avid student of history. He endeavors to provide detailed and carefully documented histories of the Christian church.

Jesus Christ Baptized as the Holy Spirit descends on him in the form of a dove
Jesus Christ Baptized as the Holy Spirit descends on him in the form of a dove | Source

What is Subordinationism?

Subordinationism is a heretical doctrine on the Trinity which describes the Son and Holy Spirit as subordinate to the Father in nature and being. To put it another way, although Christian orthodoxy holds that the Son and Holy Spirit are subordinate in their roles (sometimes called “economic subordinationism”), Subordinationism in this sense considers the second two persons of the Trinity to be lesser beings, rather than co-equal persons* of the Trinity.

Origins of Subordinationism

Although Subordinationism as a concept doubtless existed well before, the codified form of this doctrine seems to have originated in the 3rd century A.D.. Origen is often cited as its originator, though this is likely based upon an incorrect and limited reading of his works1. It is more likely that Lucian of Antioch bears the responsibility.

Lucian, like Origen, was very well esteemed as a thinker in his time, but his theological school conflicted with the orthodox church. Lucian would eventually seek to be reconciled with the church before his death, but his disciples would go on to be infamous champions of the Arian Heresy. Indeed, Arius – from whom Arianism derives its names – was one of his students. Lucian taught that the Son of God had not always existed, but has come into existence sometime before creation2. He did not believe that Jesus was a mere creation, but never the less the later developed credo of “there was a time when he was not,” established Jesus as, by nature, less than the Father. Lucian died in the Roman persecutions c. A.D. 311-312.

Arius took up his master’s mantle alongside other Lucianists, including a number of bishops. Although Arius’ doctrines might be considered conservative compared to those purveyed by later so-called Arians, his name has become synonymous with the most extreme forms of Lucianism and “Arianism.3

A Byzantine depiction of Arius
A Byzantine depiction of Arius

Arguments for Subordinationism

The two most common arguments from scripture historically presented by advocates of Subordinationism are their interpretations of two terms applied to Jesus Christ in the Bible: “begotten,+” and “firstborn.”

“If the Father begat the Son, he that was begotten had a beginning of existence; hence it is clear that there was a time^ when the Son was not.4

With this understanding of the term “begotten,” it is hardly difficult to understand why Subordinationists would interpret Christ’s description as the “Firstborn of all creation,5” to mean the literal first to come into existence.

Having determined the Son’s nature is inferior to that of the father, Subordinationists then point to Jesus’ submission to the will and authority of the Father as further evidence that the Son is, by nature, subordinate.

“Firstborn”

It is interesting to consider how many dissentions would have been rendered toothless had the Church not become so quickly alienated from its Jewish roots. Few examples of this are so striking as with the controversies surrounding these two terms, “firstborn,” and “begotten.” Both terms are drawn from the picture of Jesus’ “Sonship,” and both were intended to illuminate aspects of the Son’s relationship with the Father – particularly as it pertained to the fate of creation.

To the Jews, the “firstborn” was of particular importance. While most nations favored the firstborn son with a number of exclusive birthrights, to the Jews the firstborn’s status was tied to the preservation of Israel not merely for reasons of secular interest, but for the restoration of God’s kingdom. It was from the Jewish line that the Messiah was promised – the one who would rescue God’s elect from the desperate plight their sin had brought about.

Because of this, the term firstborn became synonymous with “preeminence.” This can be seen throughout the Old Testament. For instance, God refers to Israel as “my firstborn son.” In this instance, Israel – the man – becomes representative of the Jewish nation at that time captive in Egypt, but Israel was not the firstborn, he was the younger son who nevertheless received his brother’s birthright. A similar instance is seen in Jeremiah 31:9, where Ephraim, the younger brother, is called “firstborn.” When one examines the account of Ephraim’s life in Genesis 48, we see that Ephraim was given the firstborn’s blessing because he was prophesied to be the father of a far greater nation. This term even finds itself used to describe preeminence in negative circumstances, as in Isaiah 14:30 where those in most desolate poverty are called the “firstborn of the poor.”

“Begotten”

Likewise, Orthodox Christianity has always viewed “Begotten” to be a term meant to illuminate an aspect of Jesus’ relationship with the Father without suggesting an actual comparison to human procreation.

“Begotten” is only used as an active verb to describe the son in the context of Psalm 2:7 (“I have begotten you”). In this instance, the term cannot be construed as literal:

“The king says, ‘I will announce the Lord’s decree. He said to me: you are my son! Today I have begotten you,’ ask me, and I will give you the nations as your inheritance…6

Here we see not only a non-literal use of the term, but also an extension of the metaphor of Christ as the “Firstborn” who will receive his inheritance from the Father.

Elsewhere, the term rendered “only-begotten” (monogenes) is used. Here, Christians have understood the term to emphasize the uniqueness of the Son. He is not merely A son of God, but the only-begotten son – that is, the only son who is alike in nature with the father. This is particularly important when contrasted to God’s elect (those being saved) who are described as sons of God by adoption7. By calling Jesus God’s only-begotten son, the scripture writers distinguished him as wholly unique by right of his like-nature with God.

Subordinate in Roles

It cannot be overlooked, however, that the Son and the Holy Spirit have submitted to the authority of the Father, and that their roles are subordinate to Him8. Indeed, the Holy Spirit has even submitted himself to the Son9. But should this be construed as a sign of being “by nature” subordinate?

In writing to the church of the Philippians, Paul gave them a striking example of humility to follow. He reminded them to follow the example of Jesus Christ,

“who, though he existed in the form of God did not regard equality with God as something to be grasped, but emptied himself by taking on the form of a slave, by looking like other men, and by sharing in human nature. He humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death—even death on a cross!”

Here, the Son exists in the form of God by nature, yet submits himself to the Father as an obedient Son.

Origen is often incorrectly considered a notable figure in the development of Subordinationism
Origen is often incorrectly considered a notable figure in the development of Subordinationism | Source

Conclusion

There is much that could be said concerning Subordinationism, but as much of the responsibility for this doctrine has been laid at the feet of Origen, it is perhaps only suitable that he should have the last word:

“But it is monstrous and unlawful to compare God the Father, in the generation of His only-begotten Son, and in the substance of the same, to any man or other living thing engaged in such an act; for we must of necessity hold that there is something exceptional and worthy of God which does not admit of any comparison at all, not merely in things, but which cannot even be conceived by thought or discovered by perception, so that a human mind should be able to apprehend how the unbegotten God is made the Father of the only-begotten Son. Because His generation is as eternal and everlasting as the brilliancy which is produced from the sun. For it is not by receiving the breath of life that He is made a Son, by any outward act, but by His own nature.10


Footnotes

* For those not familiar with the distinction: orthodox Christianity holds that there is only one God, but that the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit are unique, individual persons of that being. The bishops are the First Council of Nicaea agreed to express this doctrine by stating that the three persons of the Trinity are “of one substance,” (that substance being God).

^ “A time” is a loose, but necessary translation. Arius was careful not to use the term “time,” as he fully believed the Son “by his own counsel existed before times and ages, fully God, only-begotten, unchangeable.” [Arius’ letter to Eusebius, cited from Bettenson, Docs of the Christian Church]

+ c.f. John 1:14, 1:18



1. Cortez, https://westernthm.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/origens-subordinationism.pdf

2. Schaff, Introduction to Eusebius’ Life of Constantine, section 5

3. See - Johnson, https://owlcation.com/humanities/What-Was-the-Arian-Controversy-Arius-and-the-Background-to-the-First-Council-of-Nicaea

4. “The Arian Syllogism,” from Socrates, Eccl. Hist. Book 1, chapter 5. Cited from: Bettenson, Docs. Of the Christian Church

5. Colossians 1:18

6. Psalm 2:7-8, c.f. Hebrews 1:5

7. c.f. Romans 8:15, Ephesians 1:5

8. c.f. John 5:30, 14:26

9. c.f. John 15:26

10. Origen, On First Principles, Book 1, Chapter 2 - http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/04121.htm

Questions & Answers

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      • profile image

        Donny5 

        3 months ago

        Hi guys! Interesting article! I have a small note to point out which may be relevant.

        Oracle is defined as an utterance from God or a Word from the devine

        The Hebrew word which is translated as oracle is [משא] Massa

        We know that "In the beginning was the word and the word was with God and the word was God" I like to use the phrase "before anything else" in place of "in the beginning" because it makes more sense to me (having no understanding of God's time or Infinite nature)

        If God were to never create 'all things' then The Word would never 'proceed forth' from the King

        I believe God placed a secret message in Genesis 1:3 "And God said..." God "Saying" something is the carnal birth of Massa-yah (Utterance of God) or Christ, he is therefore born but it does not mean he was not existant before this birth.

        Then we see the story continued and learn that "All thing were made through him, and without him nothing would be made." That is, the spoken word of God. We can also see that in creation, all 3 have equivelant roles, the King wills it, the Word commands it and the Spirit (the Wind/that which moves) brings it to be! Awesome how God can always satisfy EVERY condition!

      • Miebakagh57 profile image

        Miebakagh Fiberesima 

        10 months ago from Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NIGERIA.

        Hello, Bede, your opinion on both sides is without parallel. It is in this sense I opinionated that the Lord Jesus came into the world to save sinners.

        God cannot just humble Himself for nothing, though He created all. It is His man that He was after. Like a husband see the wife was completely wrong, yet in his love for her overlooked all faults for love sake. In this sense likewise, the home stays sweet and lovely always. No break-up, or separation, or divorce. It is an entire UNITY! Thank you.

      • Bede le Venerable profile image

        Bede 

        11 months ago from Minnesota

        Hi Miebakagh, here’s another perspective on your observation regarding the Father as creator. According to Catholic teaching, the Son and the Holy Spirit share equally in the work of creation with the Father. Or, as the catechism puts it, the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are “One indivisible principle of creation.”

        If the Son appears to be submissive, I believe it’s according to his human nature; he emptied himself through obedience. However, though they are equal, would not the Son have a certain humble reverence even in his divine nature, since the Father is the generator?

      • Miebakagh57 profile image

        Miebakagh Fiberesima 

        11 months ago from Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NIGERIA.

        Hi, BA Johnson, I agreed. This submission is like a woman to her husband, and husband to his wife in certain matters which cannot be fully understood. But in all, it creates equity and peace. Thank you.

      • Peopleofthebook profile imageAUTHOR

        B A Johnson 

        11 months ago

        You are absolutely right; exactly how the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit can be co-equal persons and yet one being is something I don't think we will ever fully understand. And yet despite their oneness and equality, the Son submits to the Father and the Holy Spirit to the Son - that should be humbling to all of us who struggle so often with submitting to the will of God!

      • Miebakagh57 profile image

        Miebakagh Fiberesima 

        11 months ago from Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NIGERIA.

        Hi, B A Johnson, this type of teaching puzzle and baffle ones' mind. God-Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are co-equal as regards to the Holy Trinity. But as regards to the role played in creation, God, the Father is first, followed by the son, and the Holy Spirit. Any commentator corrects me where I am not forthcoming. Thank you.

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