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60+ Awesome Sounding Words

Angel loves words, learning all about what they mean, and sharing her knowledge with others.

60+ of the Coolest, Most Epic Words in the English Language

Are you searching for interesting, epic words for your story, novel, or just for everyday use? Look no further! In this article, you'll find a list of 60 of the most awesome sounding words in the English language, plus cool words that start with the letter "Z," a list of silly words, some commonly misused words, words that sound funky and awkward, and more!

#1–15#16–30#31–45#46–60

1. Apocalyptic

16. Equilibrium

31. Mitigate

46. Serpentine

2. Bamboozled

17. Exquisite

32. Nefarious

47. Silhouette

3. Bizarre

18. Flippant

33. Onomatopoeia

48. Sinister

4. Blasphemy

19. Gerrymandering

34. Persnickety

49. Statuesque

5. Bumblebee

20. Hyperbolic

35. Phosphorous

50. Stoicism

6. Capricious

21. Hypnosis

36. Picturesque

51. Synergistic

7. Clandestine

22. Incognito

37. Plebeian

52. Tectonic

8. Cognizant

23. Indigo

38. Quadrinomial

53. Totalitarian

9. Conundrum

24. Insidious

39. Quintessential

54. Trapezoid

10. Corrosion

25. Kaleidoscope

40. Rambunctious

55. Ubiquitous

11. Crestfallen

26. Kleptomania

41. Reptilian

56. Vermillion

12. Dastardly

27. Languish

42. Sabotage

57. Villainous

13. Diabolical

28. Luminescence

43. Sanctimonious

58. Whimsical

14. Dwindling

29. Melancholy

44. Scrupulous

59. Wizardry

15. Effervescent

30. Mercurial

45. Serendipity

60. Zigzag

1. Apocalyptic

(adjective) of, relating to, or resembling an apocalypse

2. Bamboozled

(adjective) thrown into a state of confusion or bewilderment especially by being deliberately fooled or misled

3. Bizarre

(adjective) strikingly out of the ordinary

4. Blasphemy

(noun) the act of insulting or showing contempt or lack of reverence for God

5. Bumblebee

(noun) any of numerous large robust hairy social bees

6. Capricious

(adjective) governed or characterized by caprice; impulsive, unpredictable

7. Clandestine

(adjective) marked by, held in, or conducted with secrecy

8. Cognizant

(adjective) knowledgeable of something especially through personal experience

9. Conundrum

(noun) an intricate and difficult problem

10. Corrosion

(noun) the action, process, or effect of corroding

11. Crestfallen

(adjective) having a drooping crest or hanging head; feeling shame or humiliation

12. Dastardly

(adjective) characterized by underhandedness or treachery

13. Diabolical

(adjective) of, relating to, or characteristic of the devil

14. Dwindling

(verb) to become steadily less; shrink

15. Effervescent

(adjective) having the property of forming bubbles; marked by or producing effervescence

16. Equilibrium

(noun) a state of intellectual or emotional balance; a state of balance between opposing forces or actions that is either static (as in a body acted on by forces whose resultant is zero) or dynamic (as in a reversible chemical reaction when the rates of reaction in both directions are equal)

17. Exquisite

(adjective) marked by flawless craftsmanship or by beautiful, ingenious, delicate, or elaborate execution

18. Flippant

(adjective) lacking proper respect or seriousness

19. Gerrymandering

(noun) the practice of dividing or arranging a territorial unit into election districts in a way that gives one political party an unfair advantage in elections

20. Hyperbolic

(adjective) of, relating to, or marked by language that exaggerates or overstates the truth; of, relating to, or marked by hyperbole

21. Hypnosis

(noun) an artificially induced trance state resembling sleep, characterized by heightened susceptibility to suggestion

22. Incognito

(adjective) having one's identity concealed, as under an assumed name, especially to avoid notice or formal attentions

23. Indigo

(noun) a blue dye obtained from various plants, especially of the genus Indigofera, or manufactured synthetically

(noun) a color ranging from a deep violet-blue to a dark, grayish-blue

24. Insidious

(adjective) intended to entrap or beguile

(adjective) stealthily treacherous or deceitful

(adjective) operating or proceeding in an inconspicuous or seemingly harmless way but actually with grave effect

25. Kaleidoscope

(noun) an optical instrument in which bits of glass, held loosely at the end of a rotating tube, are shown in continually changing symmetrical forms by reflection in two or more mirrors set at angles to each other

26. Kleptomania

(noun) an irresistible impulse to steal, stemming from emotional disturbance rather than economic need

27. Languish

(verb) to be or become weak or feeble; droop; fade

(verb) to lose vigor and vitality

28. Luminescence

(noun) the emission of light not caused by incandescence and occurring at a temperature below that of incandescent bodies

(noun) the light produced by such an emission

29. Melancholy

(noun) a gloomy state of mind, especially when habitual or prolonged; depression

(noun) sober thoughtfulness; pensiveness

30. Mercurial

(adjective) changeable; volatile; fickle; flighty; erratic

31. Mitigate

(verb) to lessen in force or intensity, as wrath, grief, harshness, or pain; moderate

(verb) to make less severe

32. Nefarious

(adjective) extremely wicked or villainous; iniquitous

33. Onomatopoeia

(noun) the formation of a word, as cuckoo, meow, honk, or boom, by imitation of a sound made by or associated with its referent

34. Persnickety

(adjective) overparticular; fussy

(adjective) snobbish or having the aloof attitude of a snob

35. Phosphorous

(adjective) containing trivalent phosphorus (a solid, nonmetallic element existing in at least three allotropic forms . . . the element is used in forming smoke screens, its compounds are used in matches and phosphate fertilizers, and it is a necessary constituent of plant and animal life in bones, nerves, and embryos)

36. Picturesque

(adjective) visually charming or quaint, as if resembling or suitable for a painting

(adjective) (of writing, speech, etc.) strikingly graphic or vivid; creating detailed mental images

37. Plebeian

(adjective) belonging or pertaining to the common people

(adjective) of, relating to, or belonging to the Ancient Roman plebs

(adjective) common, commonplace, or vulgar

38. Quadrinomial

(adjective) consisting of four terms

39. Quintessential

(adjective) of the pure and essential essence of something

(adjective) of or relating to the most perfect embodiment of something

40. Rambunctious

(adjective) difficult to control or handle; wildly boisterous

(adjective) turbulently active and noisy

41. Reptilian

(noun) a reptile

(adjective) groveling, debased, or despicable; contemptible

42. Sabotage

(noun) any underhand interference with production, work, etc. in a plant, factory, etc. as by enemy agents during wartime or by employees during a trade dispute

43. Sanctimonious

(adjective) making a hypocritical show of religious devotion, piety, righteousness, etc.

44. Scrupulous

(adjective) having scruples, or moral or ethical standards; having or showing a strict regard for what one considers right; principled

45. Serendipity

(noun) an aptitude for making desirable discoveries by accident

(noun) good fortune; luck

46. Serpentine

(adjective) of, characteristic of, or resembling a serpent, as in form or movement

(adjective) shrewd, wily, or cunning

47. Silhouette

(noun) a two-dimensional representation of the outline of an object, as a cutout or configurational drawing, uniformly filled in with black, especially a black-paper, miniature cutout of the outlines of a person's face in profile

(noun) the outline or general shape of something

48. Sinister

(adjective) threatening or portending evil, harm, or trouble; ominous

(adjective) bad, evil, base, or wicked; fell

49. Statuesque

(adjective) like or suggesting a statue, as in massive or majestic dignity, grace, or beauty

50. Stoicism

(noun) a systematic philosophy, dating from around 300 B.C., that held the principles of logical thought to reflect a cosmic reason instantiated in nature

(noun) (lowercase) conduct conforming to the precepts of the Stoics, as repression of emotion and indifference to pleasure or pain

51. Synergistic

(adjective) pertaining to, characteristic of, or resembling synergy (the interaction of elements that when combined produce a total effect that is greater than the sum of the individual elements, contributions, etc.; synergism

52. Tectonic

(adjective) of or relating to building or construction; constructive; architectural

(adjective) pertaining to the structure of the earth's crust

53. Totalitarian

(adjective) of or relating to a centralized government that does not tolerate parties of differing opinion and that exercises dictatorial control over many aspects of life

(adjective) exercising control over the freedom, will, or thought of others; authoritarian; autocratic

54. Trapezoid

(noun) a quadrilateral plane figure having two parallel and two nonparallel sides

(noun) a bone in the wrist that articulates with the metacarpal bone of the forefinger

55. Ubiquitous

(adjective) existing or being everywhere, especially at the same time; omnipresent

56. Vermillion

(noun) a brilliant scarlet red

57. Villainous

(adjective) having a cruel, wicked, malicious nature or character

(adjective) of, relating to, or befitting a villain

58. Whimsical

(adjective) given to whimsy or fanciful notions; capricious

(adjective) of the nature of or proceeding from whimsy, as thoughts or actions

(adjective) erratic; unpredictable

59. Wizardry

(noun) the art, skill, or accomplishments of a wizard

60. Zigzag

(noun) a line, course, or progression characterized by sharp turns first to one side and then to the other

(adjective) proceeding or formed in a zigzag

Fun Words Starting With Z

WordDefinition

Zaps

Destroy or obliterate

Zarf

A holder, usually of ornamental metal, for a coffee cup without a handle

Zebu

A species or subspecies of domestic cattle originating in South Asia

Zeda

An example of a zeda is the car used to patrol the streets of a city

Zerk

A fitting often found on a wheel to allow lubrication

Zyme

An enzyme or the origin of an old medical theory that many contagious diseases were caused by enzymes that fermented in the body

Zonk

Hit or strike

Ziti

Pasta in the form of tubes resembling large macaroni

Zizz

A whizzing or buzzing sound

Zeks

An inmate of a forced-labor camp

Silly Words

The English language is one of the strangest languages out there. English contains contradicting rules, incredibly unique words, and confusing idioms. It's an easy language to be confused by or to misuse in ironic ways. Let’s explore some of the craziest words in our living language!

Silliest and Funniest Words to Say

WordDefinition

Hifalutin

Pretentious, fancy people

Squelch

A soft, sucking sound such as that made by walking heavily through mud

Pitter-patter

A rapid succession of light sounds or beats

Cooties

A children's term for an imaginary germ or repellent quality transmitted by obnoxious or slovenly people

Aardvark

A nocturnal, burrowing mammal with long ears, a tubular snout, and a long, extensible tongue that feeds on ants and termites

Thesaurus

A reference work that lists words grouped together according to similarity of meaning

Gibberish

Unintelligible or meaningless speech or writing; nonsense

Stupendous

Extremely impressive

Whatnot

An item or items that are not identified but are felt to have something in common with items already named

Noggin

A person's head

Akimbo

With hands on the hips and elbows turned otuward

Bologna

A large, smoked, seasoned sausage made of various meats, especially beef and pork

Whippersnapper

A young, inexperienced person considered to be presumptuous or overconfident

Whittle

Carve (wood) into an object by repeatedly cutting small slices from it

Balderdash

Senseless talk or writing; nonsense

Lollygag

Spend time aimlessly; idle

Spaghettification

The process by which (in some theories) an object would be stretched and ripped apart by gravitational forces upon falling into a black hole

Pumpernickle

Dark, dense German bread made from coarsely ground whole-grain rye

Knickerbocker

A New Yorker

Pantaloons

A man's close-fitting garment for the hips and legs, worm especially in the 19th century; trousers

Snickerdoodle

A soft cookie made with flour, butter, sugar, and eggs and rolled in a mixture of cinnamon and sugar before baking

Jibber-jabber

Foolish or worthless talk; nonsense

Commonly Misused Words

We’re all guilty of using a word the wrong way from time to time
(myself included). It’s the words that we think we’re using correctly that wreak the most havoc. We throw around the wrong words in meetings, e-mails, and important documents. To anyone who knows how these words work, reading these messages infuriating. Let's explore some of these words.

Most Commonly Misused Words

WordDefinition

Accept

Consent to receive (a thing offered)

Affect

Have an effect on; make a difference to

Ironic

Happening in the opposite way as what is expected, and typically causing wry amusement

Et cetera

Indicating that a list is too tedious to give in full

Gibe

An insulting or mocking remark; a taunt

Cue

A thing said or done that serves as a signal to an actor or other performer to enter or to begin their speech or performance

Adverse

Preventing success or development; harmful; unfavorable

Enervate

To sap or weaken

Nonplussed

Stunned; bewildered

Parameter

A variable

Awkward Words

When you poll a group of people on the “most disgusting words,” moist always wins in a landslide. In fact, it's the most-universally hated word in the English language. For a word to be truly objectionable, it shouldn’t just sound disgusting. In fact, there's a formula for a disgusting word. To determine why a word seems disgusting, make sure it contains phonetically abrasive letters like “b,” “g,” “m,” “u,” and “o,” which you’ll find to be common among the most hated words. Let's take a look at a few of these disgusting words.

Most Awkward Words

WordDefinition

Moist

Slightly wet; damp or humid

Bottom

The lowest point or part; buttocks

Squatting

To sit in a low or crouching position with the legs drawn up closely beneath or in front of the body

Spelunking

The exploration of caves, especially as a hobby

Cockamamy

An altered form of the term decalcomania, which denotes a process of transferring pictures and designs from specially prepared paper to surfaces such as glass or porcelain

Cumbersome

Large or heavy and therefore difficult to carry or use; unwieldy

Lugubrious

Looking or sounding sad and dismal

Gurgle

To make a hollow bubbling sound like that made by water running out of a bottle

Curd

A soft, white substance formed when milk sours, used as the basis for cheese

Slurp

To eat (or drink) something with a loud, sloppy sucking noise

Cool Old Words

Language changes over time. Words and phrases will always come and go. In many cases, there is a good reason for words leaving our vocabulary. These words are no longer in everyday use or have lost a particular meaning in current usage (but are sometimes used to impart an old-fashioned flavor to historical novels). Here are ten old English words and slang terms that are fun to say and should never have left us in the first place.

Cool Old English Words

WordDefinition

Bedward

Heading for bed

Billingsgate

Abusive language and curse words

Crapulous

Feeling ill as a result of too much eating or drinking

Fudgel

The act of giving the impression you are working, when really you are doing nothing

Groke

To stare intently at someone who is eating in the hope that they will give you some

Hugger-mugger

Secretive or covert hehavior

Jargogle

To confuse or jumble

Mumpsimus

An incorrect view on something that a person refuses to let go of

Quagswag

To shake something backward and forward

Trumpery

Things that look good but are basically worthless

Slang Words

If you’re a teenager, it might not even occur to you that the words you say are completely foreign to your parents. This is the list for you. Slang is very informal language. It can offend people if it is used about other people or outside a group of people who know each other well. We usually use slang in speaking rather than in professional writing. Slang normally refers to particular words and meanings. However, they can also include longer expressions and idioms. Here are fun examples of slang words throughout the decades!

Slang Words Throughout the Decades

WordDefinitionDecade

23 skiddoo

To get going; move along; leave; scram

1920s

The cat's pajamas

The best; the height of excellence

1920s

Hotsy-totsy

Perfect

1920s

Girl Friday

A secretary or female assistant

1930s

Blockbuster

A huge success

1940s

Boo-boo

A mistake; wound

1950s

Groovy

Cool; hip; excellent

1960s

Mind-blowing

Unbelievable; originally an expression for the effects of hallucinogenic drugs

1970s

Fly

Cool; very hip

1980s

Homeboy

A friend or buddy

1990s

Peeps

Friends; people

2000s

On fleek

Smooth; nice; sweet

2010s

Are there any words I missed? Let me know in the comments!

Jp on August 24, 2020:

Wow, thanks for this! I shall be sure to use them in my writings.

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