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  • How to use "said" correctly in a story, what to use instead of it, and other ways to convey how a word or line of dialogue was said.

    550 Alternative Words for "Said"

    550 Alternative Words for "Said"

    by ajbarnett355

  • These contemptuous F-Words are divided into subsections for describing people, animals and things, also for use as verbs. Meanings are added for those who are interested in learning something new.

    50 Unfriendly F-Words You Can Say Instead

    50 Unfriendly F-Words You Can Say Instead

    by Dora Weithers65

  • A pun is a play on words designed to tickle and tease. But what's a paranomasia, and why should you care? Find out by reading the whole article.

    How Puns Work as a Play on Words

    How Puns Work as a Play on Words

    by JohnMello9

  • Writers often struggle to find the right word to capture the qualities of touch and texture. Here is a list to help you find the perfect word.

    400 Words to Describe Texture

    400 Words to Describe Texture

    by ajbarnett40

  • The phonetic alphabet can serve many useful purposes in communication, education and linguistics. ABC is Alpha Bravo Charlie.

    What Is the Phonetic Alphabet?

    What Is the Phonetic Alphabet?

    by Stephen Bush7

  • Often English speakers reach back into history in expressing themselves without realizing they are doing so.

    Origins of Familiar Phrases

    Origins of Familiar Phrases

    by Rupert Taylor0

  • Here, in the USA, we excel at destroying language. “What does that word mean?” You ask? Not us. Here in the good ol' USA, we assume and call it good. That's why "literal" is no longer literal.

    The Decline of American English Is Self-Inflicted

    The Decline of American English Is Self-Inflicted

    by kwade tweeling2

  • The days of the week and the months of the year are the yardstick by which we define the turning of the Earth on its axis, and the revolution of the Earth around the Sun, and by which we date the events of our lives. But where do the names come from?

    Days of the Week—Origin of Their Names

    Days of the Week—Origin of Their Names

    by Greensleeves Hubs12

  • English is a fascinating cocktail of other languages, both modern and ancient. In this article, I take a light-hearted look at the how the world of ancient Greece affects our vocabulary today.

    My Big Fat Greek Vocabulary

    My Big Fat Greek Vocabulary

    by Mary Phelan3

  • WordPlay can be puns, anagrams, palindromes and more. A lipogram is a form of word-play which requires the omission of one or more letters from a text.

    What Is a Lipogram?

    What Is a Lipogram?

    by Catherine Giordano66

  • Round about the third glass of wine someone decides it’s amusing to introduce tongue twisters into the party. No it’s not; it’s maddening and people have been shot for less.

    Tangling With Tongue Twisters

    Tangling With Tongue Twisters

    by Rupert Taylor2

  • Tortured translations of local languages into English cause hilarity for tourists and embarrassment for hosts; but, it works the other way round too.

    Mangled English Translations

    Mangled English Translations

    by Rupert Taylor1

  • The early 1900's were a time of displacement of over 500,000 people in the U.S. Many became Hobos and became a migrant society. As they traveled they developed a communication code using symbols.

    All Things Hobo—Signs and Symbols

    All Things Hobo—Signs and Symbols

    by Joel Diffendarfer11

  • In this lesson, we take a look at what the grammatical function of a noun is. We also take a detailed look at all five functions of a noun, and give simple examples to deepen your understanding.

    Functions of Nouns

    Functions of Nouns

    by myvenn11

  • I discovered that no one else seemed to use some of the words our family used. Thinking that they must be related to my ancestors I wondered if this might happen to other people, too.

    Are They Cornish Words?

    Are They Cornish Words?

    by Bronwen Scott-Branagan26

  • The wise ESL and EFL teacher should spend extra time making sure that his or her students understand common words used as homonyms, homophones, and homographs. This can only be done through practice.

    Homonyms, Homophones, and Homographs for ESL Students

    Homonyms, Homophones, and Homographs for ESL Students

    by Paul Richard Kuehn32

  • Writing and editing require knowledge of correct spelling and word use, in order to be truly effective. If you don't know the difference between peek, peak, and pique, you may lead your readers down a wrong path.

    Choose the Right Word: Peek, Peak, or Pique

    Choose the Right Word: Peek, Peak, or Pique

    by Aficionada5

  • This is a research based examination seeking the correct form or use between the contested terms "buck naked" and "butt naked." Research from the OED, academic debate, and a general academic search. Reasonable arguments and even some humor peppered in.

    Is It "Buck Naked" or "Butt Naked?"

    Is It "Buck Naked" or "Butt Naked?"

    by Shadesbreath65

  • The Naughty Grammarian instructs on the finer points of English usage, points either never learned or long ago forgotten. This lesson is about misuse of the past tense.

    Is It Drug or Dragged?

    Is It Drug or Dragged?

    by Catherine Giordano12

  • Do you know what euphemisms are? This article takes a look at what euphemisms are and some of the most common euphemisms for death, sucide, pregnancy, going to the toilet, etc.

    Euphemisms for Death, Suicide, and Others

    Euphemisms for Death, Suicide, and Others

    by myvenn2

  • A game of word definitions created by a malevolent writer who has juggled with the subject matter all his life.

    Dictionary Quiz

    Dictionary Quiz

    by Rupert Taylor5

  • Bull and cows turn up in our language as colourful illustrators of thoughts.

    Holy Cow-Bovine Idioms

    Holy Cow-Bovine Idioms

    by Rupert Taylor3

  • There is an old proverb "English is a but-put language." The two words are spelt the same, but pronounced differently. Here are some common words or phrases we pronounce or use incorrectly.

    The Art of English (Mis)pronunciation

    The Art of English (Mis)pronunciation

    by Glossophiliac0

  • Idioms are especially difficult for foreigners of any language. Idioms are not necessarily predictable in their use or context. Here is a list of happy idioms in the English language.

    Happy Idioms - Figurative Language

    Happy Idioms - Figurative Language

    by Marisa Hammond Olivares48

  • A simple explanation of the difference between the two often-misused words "percent" and "percentage" and when you should and shouldn't use them.

    Word Use: Percent vs. Percentage

    Word Use: Percent vs. Percentage

    by Laura Schneider10

  • Ope is a phrase that supposedly exists only in the Midwest. Here, we examine usages of this phrase and other slang from the Midwest.

    The Midwest Accent & Slang Terms

    The Midwest Accent & Slang Terms

    by Melanie Palen7

  • Brief comparison between British and American English; then an overview of various native languages, dialects and accents in Britain to highlight the language diversity in UK compared to the USA.

    American vs British Accents, Dialects and Languages

    American vs British Accents, Dialects and Languages

    by Arthur Russ5

  • Learn how to simplify your print and online content using plain English so that your communications are clear and easy to understand for a wide audience.

    A Guide to Using Plain English

    A Guide to Using Plain English

    by Sally Hayes20

  • Ahhh, isn't love grand? Yes, it is. But do you know where the most famous love idioms and phrases originated from? The Bible? History? Medical Studies? Yes, that's where they come from!

    Origins of Romantic Idioms and Phrases

    Origins of Romantic Idioms and Phrases

    by Autumn5

  • Structuralists and Descriptivists had different approaches to the study of grammar and this can be especially seen in the work of Bloomfield and Chomsky.

    Grammar and Structural Analysis

    Grammar and Structural Analysis

    by Bronwen Scott-Branagan17

  • A brief look at language study and grammar, including traditional types of grammars and universal grammar as seen by grammarians and linguists.

    The History of Grammar

    The History of Grammar

    by Bronwen Scott-Branagan17

  • Of the world’s approximately 6,000 languages, English is said to be one of the easier ones to learn despite its idiosyncrasies of spelling and pronunciation.

    The Oddities of English and Other Languages

    The Oddities of English and Other Languages

    by Rupert Taylor3

  • The days of the week and the months of the year are the yardstick by which we define the turning of the Earth on its axis, and the revolution of the Earth around the Sun, and by which we date the events of our lives. But where do the names come from?

    Months of the Year—Origin of Their Names

    Months of the Year—Origin of Their Names

    by Greensleeves Hubs4

  • Good writing is at an all time low. As a result of the lack of teaching in schools, most people can no longer write a grammatical sentence. Here's why it matters.

    Why Grammar Matters

    Why Grammar Matters

    by Tessa Schlesinger2

  • Need another word instead of "said?" Try my Easy charts of Other Words for Said. Plus ideas for writing good dialogue and using Author Tags for Research Citation.

    Other Words for "Said"

    Other Words for "Said"

    by Virginia Kearney12

  • It may surprise many people to learn that most Cajuns under the age of 50 don't speak French; even those who do don't usually speak it as their first language. However, almost all of us grow up speaking some French, and our vocabulary is full of...

    How to Speak Cajun English (Or at Least Understand It)

    How to Speak Cajun English (Or at Least Understand It)

    by ckadyarc68

  • In this article we answer the question "what is the grammatical function of a pronoun?" And we also take a detailed look at all the grammatical functions of pronouns.

    Grammatical Functions of Pronouns

    Grammatical Functions of Pronouns

    by myvenn11

  • One of the most common word usage mistakes in the English language is confusing the words "worse" and "worst."

    Worse vs. Worst

    Worse vs. Worst

    by Wendy Leanne67

  • The English language is full of words that sound alike but are written differently, or are spelled alike but pronounced differently, and which make you look silly when you mix them up. This article discusses why we shouldn't try to peak someone's interest, wet someone's appetite, say "Here comes the Calvary," drink expresso, or use affect as a noun outside of clinical psychology.

    You’re Saying It Wrong: Five Commonly Misspoken (and Misspelled) Words and Phrases

    You’re Saying It Wrong: Five Commonly Misspoken (and Misspelled) Words and Phrases

    by Jeff Berndt21

  • Plain English is in short supply in school reports, government documents, the fine print of insurance policies, and a host of other areas.

    Fighting Gibberish and Bafflegab

    Fighting Gibberish and Bafflegab

    by Rupert Taylor2

  • English grammar can be difficult and confusing at times, even for native speakers. Learn more about classifying sentences to improve your speaking and writing skills.

    English Grammar: Classifying Sentences

    English Grammar: Classifying Sentences

    by L Sarhan4

  • A brief examination of the correct grammatical use and origins of the phrase "bad rap." The purpose being to provide research based confirmation of its standard use and to show the grammatical basis for considering the phrase "bad wrap" to be incorrect.

    Is it

    Is it "Bad Rap" or "Bad Wrap?"

    by Shadesbreath115

  • The English language isn't always the easiest. In fact, there are some troublesome words that tend to haunt many people especially writers. Here are 34 that are commonly confused.

    34 Words Authors Get Confused

    34 Words Authors Get Confused

    by Rebecca Graf11

  • Phonological, orthographic, semantic, and contextual levels of lingusitic awareness are necessary for measuring reading fluency. Take a short simple test to see if you demonstrate reading fluency.

    Measuring Reading Fluency

    Measuring Reading Fluency

    by Paul Richard Kuehn20

  • British and American English can be vastly different, much to the surprise and humor of everyone involved! Here are a few fun tidbits about how our neighbors speak across the pond.

    British and American English Differences

    British and American English Differences

    by Ann Leavitt53

  • Top 10 Most Annoying Cliches - From meaningless contradictions to condescending insults, cliches can be unbearably irritating.

    Top 10 Most Annoying Cliches

    Top 10 Most Annoying Cliches

    by Thomas Swan42

  • Simple similes - a comparison of two things that have something in common but are really very different. Similes are a form of figurative language and are used to evoke sensory details and imagery.

    Simile Examples and Video: Keeping Similes Simple

    Simile Examples and Video: Keeping Similes Simple

    by Marisa Hammond Olivares15

  • We all know how important knowing the perfect word to use at just the right time can be, but can you use these meta-linguistic words? Read on to learn a few handy words-on-words and get smarter.

    40 Words About Words: How Many Do You Know?

    40 Words About Words: How Many Do You Know?

    by Richard Green2

  • The English language abounds with expressions that have been in common usage for so long that everyone knows exactly what they mean. Known as idioms, many of these expressions have surprising origins.

    10 Common English Idioms and Their Surprising Origins.

    10 Common English Idioms and Their Surprising Origins.

    by Stephen Barnes4

  • Not all grammar is cut and dry. There are some that are debated quite vehemently with no clear answer.

    4 Pieces of Debated Grammar

    4 Pieces of Debated Grammar

    by Rebecca Graf5

  • Calling all logophiles and lexophiles—it’s time to have some fun wordplay fun. Paraprosdokians use puns and other techniques to alter meaning in an unexpected and funny way.

    What is a Paraprosdokian?

    What is a Paraprosdokian?

    by Catherine Giordano25

  • An overview of the word passion including the etymological history of the word and how it has changed over time.

    The Etymology of Passion

    The Etymology of Passion

    by Admiral Murrah4

  • Phrases are the building blocks of all sentences. This tutorial will examine the different types of phrases that we will encounter throughout the Bible.

    Block Diagramming: Types of Phrases

    Block Diagramming: Types of Phrases

    by Steven Long0

  • 50 idioms and phrases that have their origins in all things nautical. Sea-faring has developed a unique language and terminology over the centuries and many of these snippets of language are now incorporated into everyday our vocabulary, often without us realising where they began.

    50 Nautical Terms and Sailing Phrases That Have Enriched Our Language

    50 Nautical Terms and Sailing Phrases That Have Enriched Our Language

    by Ben Reed2

  • Learn more about the types of nouns in English grammar. Increase your understanding with instructional videos and interactive quizzes on nouns.

    English Grammar: Types of Nouns

    English Grammar: Types of Nouns

    by L Sarhan6

  • Lady Semicolon is at once elegant and intimidating. Many a writer will avoid her, but a few bold souls will invite her to their dinner parties. Will you invite Snooty Semicolon to your literary circles? She awaits your response.

    The Semicolon—Sassy and Snooty—Rules and Uses

    The Semicolon—Sassy and Snooty—Rules and Uses

    by Cynthia Calhoun30

  • Onomatopoeia. Words that sound the same as their meanings. Words that imitate sounds associated with objects or actions. Words we use every day. Zip! Screech! Click! Clack! Snap Crackle Pop! Buzz! Chirp! Clang! Clap! Crackle! Hiss!

    English-Language Onomatopoeia Words: Examples and Meaning

    English-Language Onomatopoeia Words: Examples and Meaning

    by WorkAtHomeMums5

  • Have you ever wanted to impress a friend or co-worker with your intellect? Do you want to push your next paper up a few grades? In this article I've listed 21 words that will help you to do so.

    21 Words That Will Make You Sound Smarter

    21 Words That Will Make You Sound Smarter

    by K S Lane3

  • This article is to explain how tongue twisters work., mostly the woodchuck tongue twister. I also have some history on the English language to help others further understand these phrases.

    Woodchuck Tongue Twister Explained

    Woodchuck Tongue Twister Explained

    by Kayla Sulpizio0

  • Here is another dastardly list of words with definitions and pronunciation. The quiz will help you remember the words. If you don't know what legerity means, read on! If you do, try the quiz.

    50 Words You Probably Don't Know

    50 Words You Probably Don't Know

    by Richard Green0

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