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Things That Make You Go Eww: Plants and Fungi That Look Like Body Parts

Updated on June 23, 2017
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FlourishAnyway is a psychologist who finds humor in the fascinating world of plants and animals around her.

The Plants and the Fungus Among Us ... Oh, My!

It's a mushroom, people.  A mushroom.  Don't get all judgmental on me.
It's a mushroom, people. A mushroom. Don't get all judgmental on me. | Source

Mother Nature: Is She Finally Going Soft in the Noggin?

One of the first signs that Mother Nature may have been going soft in the old noggin was when she started repeating herself. And I'm not talking just once.

Certain plants and fungi started taking on a striking resemblance to parts of the human anatomy. People began to whisper about her "senior moments" when they noticed that certain flowers and mushrooms actually resemble human brains, fingers and toes, eyes, and—oh, how I wish I were making this up—private parts.

Is Old Ma Nature simply bored of her job? (People say she should've retired years ago.) Has she lost her creative spark? Did she forget that she had already created something similar?

I'm choosing to believe the old broad just has a wicked sense of humor.

Whatever the case, you need to get a load of her handiwork. She's causing quite a ruckus, and we need to figure out what to do with the old card. People are starting to talk.

And the worst part is I don't think she gives a flyin' flip anymore.

When Mother Nature Starts Repeating Herself

Hey, what's wrong Ma?  Don't like your job anymore?  You're starting to repeat yourself.
Hey, what's wrong Ma? Don't like your job anymore? You're starting to repeat yourself. | Source

Plants and Fungi That Look like Brains

Look at the following plants and fungi. Then look at the human brain. You'll come to the conclusion that Ma Nature just did a "copy and paste" maneuver. Take, for instance, the false morel mushroom, which comes in several varieties in Europe and 8-10 in North America.

False Morels: Mushrooms That Look Like Brains

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Gyromitra caroliniana or False Morel is a zombie lover's delight.  They look just like brains with their folds, creases, lobes, and air pockets.  Verpa bohemica is called the Early False Morel.  It has brain-like convolutions and in susceptible people causes gastrointestinal upset and neuromuscular problems (or worse).Mother Nature must be really fond of the brain because she's copied it in so many places in the plant and fungal worlds.  The human brain weighs on average 3.3 pounds (1.5 kg).
Gyromitra caroliniana or False Morel is a zombie lover's delight.  They look just like brains with their folds, creases, lobes, and air pockets.
Gyromitra caroliniana or False Morel is a zombie lover's delight. They look just like brains with their folds, creases, lobes, and air pockets. | Source
Verpa bohemica is called the Early False Morel.  It has brain-like convolutions and in susceptible people causes gastrointestinal upset and neuromuscular problems (or worse).
Verpa bohemica is called the Early False Morel. It has brain-like convolutions and in susceptible people causes gastrointestinal upset and neuromuscular problems (or worse). | Source
Mother Nature must be really fond of the brain because she's copied it in so many places in the plant and fungal worlds.  The human brain weighs on average 3.3 pounds (1.5 kg).
Mother Nature must be really fond of the brain because she's copied it in so many places in the plant and fungal worlds. The human brain weighs on average 3.3 pounds (1.5 kg). | Source

False Morel Mushrooms

These fungi have wrinkled and convoluted caps with lobes, folds, flaps, and wrinkles just like brains. They come in colors that include gray, white, black, brown and reddish.1

False morels feed on tree roots and decomposing leaves, helping to replenish the forest. However, they are not exactly brain food.

Although some people do eat them, false morels have caused life-threatening illness and death. It is generally not recommended that they be eaten, as toxicity depends on cooking technique, personal sensitivity, and the specific variety of mushroom.

Ahhhh ... Brains! Brains!

Make the zombies happy by feeding them False Morel mushrooms and cauliflower.  They  look like brains!
Make the zombies happy by feeding them False Morel mushrooms and cauliflower. They look like brains! | Source

Simply breathing cooking vapors from these mushrooms is enough to cause health effects for some people. That is because the false morel contains a substance that is a hemolytic toxin (i.e., it destroys red blood cells); it causes damage to the liver and the central nervous system.

The active ingredient in false morels (gyromitrin) is metabolized to monomethylhydrazine, or rocket fuel, in the body. Thus it's best to leave the false morels as food for zombies—unless you want to be a zombie yourself.

Senior Moment, My Patootie! Ma Nature's Just Having Fun

Mother Nature cleverly created a vegetable that is packed with health benefits, looks like a brain, and smells like stinky farts when cooked.  Who's laughing now?
Mother Nature cleverly created a vegetable that is packed with health benefits, looks like a brain, and smells like stinky farts when cooked. Who's laughing now? | Source

Cauliflower: A Healthy Choice

Don't let cauliflower's cooking odor dissuade you. The vegetable is packed with nutritional benefits.

Cauliflower supports the body's detoxification and confers anti-inflammatory benefits as

  • an excellent source of vitamins C, K, and B6, plus folate and
  • a very good source of dietary fiber and omega-3 fatty acids, among other nutrients.2

Cauliflower: Looks like a Brain, Smells like Farts When Cooked

The next time you reach for a vegetable, pick the one that looks like a brain. Cauliflower might be a creepy looking choice, but it's also good for you.

Cauliflower is a vegetable that looks like a brain with its compact, granular head, central stalk and florets. It can be found in white, light green, and purple colors.

Raw cauliflower is firm, a bit spongy, and tastes mild. Although most people eat the florets, the leaves and stems are also edible.

If you choose to cook it, however, beware. Cooking cauliflower releases harmless sulphur compounds that smell like rotten eggs. That's "stinky fart smell" to you and me. (I suspect Mother Nature knew what she was doing with this vegetable.)

Nice One, Mother Nature! We Gotta Eat That Thing

Thanks for the visual, Mother Nature, and for the smell, too.  Cauliflower looks like a brain, with its compact head, florets and central stalk.  Cruciferous vegetables emit a foul sulphur odor that smells like rotten eggs when cooked.
Thanks for the visual, Mother Nature, and for the smell, too. Cauliflower looks like a brain, with its compact head, florets and central stalk. Cruciferous vegetables emit a foul sulphur odor that smells like rotten eggs when cooked. | Source

Celosia or Cockscomb: Flowers That Look like Brains

As if making brain-shaped fungi and vegetables weren't enough, Mother Nature also decided to get creative with flowers. What a show off!

Cockscombs, or Celosias, are a highly colored species of annual flower. They have compact, velvety textured heads that measure 2-5 inches (about 5-13 cm) across and look convoluted like human brains.3 The fragrance-free flowers come in vivid colors, including reds, golds, yellows, pinks, and purples.

In the Victorian language of flowers, the cockscomb symbolized humor, silliness, and warmth.4

Cockscombs Look like Velvety Brains on Long Stems

Imagine having a vase full of these!  There are over 60 species of Celosias.
Imagine having a vase full of these! There are over 60 species of Celosias. | Source

Reader Opinion Poll: Your Perspective

What's going on with old Ma Nature?

See results

Purple Jellydisc Is a Fungus That Looks like Intestines

Brains are one thing, intestines quite another. Old Mother Nature took a bit of a gross turn when she conjured up Ascocoryne sarcoides, commonly known as purple jellydisc.

Pink or purple in color, this fungus has a gummy texture and looks like intestines—or raw hamburger, your choice. During its development, the fungus begins by forming many cup-shaped discs that eventually converge to form a gelatinous, irregular mass.

Purple jellydisc appears throughout North America, Europe and Asia, growing in clusters among decaying stumps and logs. It can sometimes appear on live trees as well. Purple jellydisc has mild antibiotic properties which protects trees against bacteria causing tree-destroying heart rot.5

The fungus is considered inedible, in case you were wondering.

Purple Jellydisc Fungi: Ugly but Helpful

This fungus looks intestinal in nature.  It has a jelly-like consistency and has mild antibiotic properties, protecting trees against the bacteria that causes heart rot.
This fungus looks intestinal in nature. It has a jelly-like consistency and has mild antibiotic properties, protecting trees against the bacteria that causes heart rot. | Source

Devil's Fingers: What an Evil Looking Twist

Talk about creepy! Scary movies must have influenced the creation of Clathrus archeri, the fungus commonly known as Devil's fingers (pictured below).

Its four to seven slender fingers erupt from a partially buried ball known as a "suberumpent egg," and the fingers unfold to resemble the hand of Satan clawing his way out of the soil. The more common variety features red fingers while a variety found in the forests of Kerala, India, feature white fingers and black tips (shown).6

It doesn't help that the fungus smells like putrid flesh and attracts flies. Devil's fingers is a fungus native to Australia and Tasmania, but it has been introduced to North America, Europe, and Asia.

Clathrus Archeri or Devil’s Fingers: Smells like Rotting Flesh

Click thumbnail to view full-size
The Devil's Fingers fungus is also known as Octopus Stinkhorn.  It comes in both red and white varieties.  The fungus is indigenous to Australia and Tasmania.The Devil's Fingers fungus is edible but extremely foul tasting.  The suberumpent eggs taste like radishes. Are you seriously that hungry?
The Devil's Fingers fungus is also known as Octopus Stinkhorn.  It comes in both red and white varieties.  The fungus is indigenous to Australia and Tasmania.
The Devil's Fingers fungus is also known as Octopus Stinkhorn. It comes in both red and white varieties. The fungus is indigenous to Australia and Tasmania. | Source
The Devil's Fingers fungus is edible but extremely foul tasting.  The suberumpent eggs taste like radishes. Are you seriously that hungry?
The Devil's Fingers fungus is edible but extremely foul tasting. The suberumpent eggs taste like radishes. Are you seriously that hungry? | Source

Fleece Flower Root or Fo-ti: Humanoid Roots

Man-made or nature-made? The fleece flower root (pictured here) is an aggressively growing Chinese herbal root. It is said to come out of the ground looking like fully formed male or female bodies—complete with all their "bits and pieces."

The fleece flower root is used in traditional Chinese medicine to restore youth and vitality as well as sexual potency.7

Disbelievers contend that the roots are not Mother Nature's handiwork at all but rather the product of gardeners who coax the roots into humanoid shapes using plastic molds, much like other gardeners do with Buddha-shaped pears and square-shaped watermelons. What do you think?

How Awkward! The Plant That Looks Like A Person

Doll's Eyes: Deadly Eye Kebabs

It takes a sick sense of humor to dream this one up. The White Baneberry, commonly known as Doll's eyes, is a flowering perennial plant belonging to the buttercup family.

As its white flowers fall away, they are replaced by creepy looking berries that resemble eyeballs—lots of them. This eye kebab plant prefers clay soil and is native to North America.

The Doll's eyes plant is weird alright, but there's a sinister side, too. Its oblong berries contain cardiogenic toxins which quickly sedate the heart, leading to heart attack and death. Ingesting just five or six of these bad boys can cause serious damage.8

Curiously, birds are unaffected by the berries, and skilled herbalists can craft medicinal teas from the plant to treat pain and bronchial symptoms.

Heart-Stoppers: Don't Eat the Doll's Eyes

The White Baneberry or "Doll's Eyes" is considered poisonous to humans.  Eating just 5 or 6 berries can have an immediate sedative effect on the heart, causing heart attack and even death.  Birds, however, can eat the berries without a problem.
The White Baneberry or "Doll's Eyes" is considered poisonous to humans. Eating just 5 or 6 berries can have an immediate sedative effect on the heart, causing heart attack and even death. Birds, however, can eat the berries without a problem. | Source

Reader Poll

Of the fungi and plants featured here, what is Mother Nature's most impressive work?

See results

Slime Mold Makes Trees Look like They Are Sprouting Hair

If you suspect that a nearby tree is growing hair, think again. It's probably just chocolate slime mold. (Technically speaking, however, it's not a mold at all but rather a colony of single-celled protists.)

Found worldwide (except Antarctica), chocolate tube slime mold grows in clusters on the forest floor and on rotting wood.9 It starts out as a single cell organism, but when its food grows scarce, cells merge to become a multi-celled organism that can grow to the size of a pizza.

The gelatinous blob then can change shape and move along surfaces, albeit very slowly.10

Scientists have taken an interest in this primitive organism for two major reasons. Even though it lacks a brain, slime mold has demonstrated the ability to learn—to memorize and anticipate repeated events.11

Additionally, the mold is being investigated as a potential boon in cancer research because it slows blood flow to tumors.

Rock on, Mother Nature! Rock on!

Slime Mold or a Tree with a Bad Toupée?

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Slime molds may be gross, but they're potentially useful in cancer research.  They can move, change shape, and learn.  How's that for awesome?This chocolate tube slime looks like someone left their wig behind in the forest.  Creepy!
Slime molds may be gross, but they're potentially useful in cancer research.  They can move, change shape, and learn.  How's that for awesome?
Slime molds may be gross, but they're potentially useful in cancer research. They can move, change shape, and learn. How's that for awesome? | Source
This chocolate tube slime looks like someone left their wig behind in the forest.  Creepy!
This chocolate tube slime looks like someone left their wig behind in the forest. Creepy! | Source

Fenestraria or "Baby Toes"

Plants generally aren't considered "cute," but this one may be an exception, as it resembles the fat toes of babies.

Fenestraria is a perennial succulent plant that is native to the arid regions of coastal South Africa and Namibia. Its stubby little leaves peek out of the soil typically no more than 2 inches (about 5 cm), and they feature translucent windows on their flattened or slightly rounded tips.

How Cute Are Those Baby Toes?

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Baby's toes are native the the hot, sandy soils of Namibia and South Africa.  Often, only two inches of the plant peek through the soil.Baby's toes boast a white or yellow flower that resemble a daisy.  The plant is relatively easy to grow and requires minimal watering.  Green thumb not required.Compare the plant to the real thing here.
Baby's toes are native the the hot, sandy soils of Namibia and South Africa.  Often, only two inches of the plant peek through the soil.
Baby's toes are native the the hot, sandy soils of Namibia and South Africa. Often, only two inches of the plant peek through the soil. | Source
Baby's toes boast a white or yellow flower that resemble a daisy.  The plant is relatively easy to grow and requires minimal watering.  Green thumb not required.
Baby's toes boast a white or yellow flower that resemble a daisy. The plant is relatively easy to grow and requires minimal watering. Green thumb not required. | Source
Compare the plant to the real thing here.
Compare the plant to the real thing here. | Source

The Stinkhorns: Ma Nature Gone Wild?

I sure hope you didn't automatically scroll right down to this part. You didn't bypass those fascinating plants and fungi that look like brains, intestines, and fingers just to get to this low brow stuff.

You did, didn't you? If so, then ou and the old broad are clearly cut of the same cloth. (I knew it.)

When it came to creating Stinkhorns, Ma Nature outdid herself. She found something she liked and was really good at, so she just kept repeating herself. With some specimens, the results even surprised her.

With Some Creations, Mother Nature Even Surprised Herself

Oh yes, she knew what she was doing.  Don't let the old lady routine fool you.
Oh yes, she knew what she was doing. Don't let the old lady routine fool you. | Source

What Are These Shocking Stinkhorn Mushrooms?

What Mother Nature has done here is only wrong if you have a dirty mind. These are mere mushrooms, people. And only that.

Stinkhorns are a broad family of fungi called Phallaceae (as in the ahem, phallus). Stinkhorns are found across the globe, and they often pop up in urban settings. They are not harmful to either humans or pets.

Mother Nature's Phallic Symbols: She Repeats Herself A Lot

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Here is a Yellow Stinkhorn sprouting from its suberumpent, or partially buried, eggs.  Ma Nature outdid herself with the sheer variety of stinkhorns.  The Common Stinkhorn is the best known of the species.  You usually smell it before you see it.The Ravenel's Stinkhorn is widespread in eastern North America.The stinkhorn is known for its foul odor, the purpose of which is to attract flies that will spread its spores.  It's all about survival, spreading the seed, repopulation.Small and thin with a dark tip, this fungus is known as the Dog Stinkhorn.This Dune Stinkhorn prefers sandy soils.  Its fruiting body lasts a mere one to two days.
Here is a Yellow Stinkhorn sprouting from its suberumpent, or partially buried, eggs.
Here is a Yellow Stinkhorn sprouting from its suberumpent, or partially buried, eggs. | Source
Ma Nature outdid herself with the sheer variety of stinkhorns.  The Common Stinkhorn is the best known of the species.  You usually smell it before you see it.
Ma Nature outdid herself with the sheer variety of stinkhorns. The Common Stinkhorn is the best known of the species. You usually smell it before you see it. | Source
The Ravenel's Stinkhorn is widespread in eastern North America.
The Ravenel's Stinkhorn is widespread in eastern North America. | Source
The stinkhorn is known for its foul odor, the purpose of which is to attract flies that will spread its spores.  It's all about survival, spreading the seed, repopulation.
The stinkhorn is known for its foul odor, the purpose of which is to attract flies that will spread its spores. It's all about survival, spreading the seed, repopulation. | Source
Small and thin with a dark tip, this fungus is known as the Dog Stinkhorn.
Small and thin with a dark tip, this fungus is known as the Dog Stinkhorn. | Source
This Dune Stinkhorn prefers sandy soils.  Its fruiting body lasts a mere one to two days.
This Dune Stinkhorn prefers sandy soils. Its fruiting body lasts a mere one to two days. | Source

Stinkhorns are extremely diverse in physical appearance and include the Devil's Fingers example from above.

Although stinkhorns can vary dramatically from one another in appearance, all stinkhorns share two common characteristics:

  1. The fruiting body (the part that contains spores) arises from a partially submerged egg that may disappear when the fungus matures.
  2. At some stage of development, a portion of the fungus is covered with a foul-smelling slime. The scented slime smells like rotting flesh or dung and is designed to attract flies so that the fungus can scatter its spores.12 The scent is so potent that you'll probably smell a stinkhorn before you see it.

In traditional Chinese circles, people clean the slime off stinkhorns, dry them, and eat them. To the Chinese, stinkhorns are delicacies and aphrodisiacs.

The Butterfly Pea: Stop Your Inappropriate Giggling

Click thumbnail to view full-size
The Clitoria ternatea is more commonly known as the Butterfly Pea.  The flowering plant grows on a vine, is indigenous to Asia, and comes in white and bright blue varieties. Modern medicine has found value in the Butterfly Pea plant for its anti-inflammatory, fever reducing, analgesic, tranquilizing, and immunomodulatory properties.The Butterfly Pea is used as as food colorant in some cultures.
The Clitoria ternatea is more commonly known as the Butterfly Pea.  The flowering plant grows on a vine, is indigenous to Asia, and comes in white and bright blue varieties.
The Clitoria ternatea is more commonly known as the Butterfly Pea. The flowering plant grows on a vine, is indigenous to Asia, and comes in white and bright blue varieties. | Source
Modern medicine has found value in the Butterfly Pea plant for its anti-inflammatory, fever reducing, analgesic, tranquilizing, and immunomodulatory properties.
Modern medicine has found value in the Butterfly Pea plant for its anti-inflammatory, fever reducing, analgesic, tranquilizing, and immunomodulatory properties. | Source
The Butterfly Pea is used as as food colorant in some cultures.
The Butterfly Pea is used as as food colorant in some cultures. | Source

The Butterfly Pea Is the Flower That Looks like Lady Parts

Just the name of this flower is enough to make a person blush: Clitoria ternatea. Thankfully, for those of us prone to inappropriate giggling it is more commonly known as the Butterfly Pea. Either way, the damn thing looks like lady parts.

The Butterfly Pea is a perennial plant that was native to Asia but which has since been introduced to Africa, North America, and Australia. A hearty plant, it grows on vines up to 15 ft (about 4.6 m) in length, producing the vivid blue to white flowers for which it is known.

Its pea pods contain 6-10 peas each and are considered edible. In some cultures, the flowers themselves are used as a food colorant or are served up dipped, battered, and fried.

For centuries, the flower has been used in traditional medicine, particularly as an antimicrobial and anti-cancer agent. More recently, modern research has found that parts of the Butterfly Pea plant have anti-inflammatory, fever reducing, analgesic, tranquilizing, and immunomodulatory value.13

Did Mother Nature Have A Senior Moment?

It's a flower, people.  Just a flower.
It's a flower, people. Just a flower. | Source

Summary

We've found plenty of examples where plants and fungi have taken on an odd resemblance to certain human body parts. Some say these are solid evidence of the old gal's senior moments.

I still think the old gal just has a wicked sense of humor. Who else could have invent these combinations? Certainly not someone going soft in the noggin.

We've seen:

  • Brain-shaped fungi whose active ingredient is metabolized to rocket fuel
  • A brain-shaped vegetable that releases a stinky fart smell when cooked
  • A fungus that looks like intestines and protects trees with its antibiotic properties
  • A mushroom that looks like the hand of Satan hatching from a half-buried egg
  • Herbal roots that resemble a fully formed human being, complete with their bits and pieces
  • Weird eyes on a stick that are so deadly that eating just a few can instantly stop your heart
  • Blobs of slime that change shape, learn, and move along surfaces
  • Mushrooms that look like male organs and smell like rotting flesh or poop
  • Edible flowers that look like lady parts

Let's keep the old card around for a few billion more years. With creations like these, she's got a lot of good stuff still left in her. Besides, with powers like these who wants to make the old lady mad?

Sometimes she has fun with the random fruit.  She made this one look like a human backside.
Sometimes she has fun with the random fruit. She made this one look like a human backside. | Source

Notes

1Missouri Department of Conservation (n.d.). False Morels. Retrieved May 26, 2014, from http://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/false-morels.

2The George Mateljan Foundation (n.d.). Cauliflower. Retrieved May 26, 2014, from whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=13.

3Texas Cooperative Extension (2006, April). Celosia. Retrieved from http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/newsletters/hortupdate/hortupdate_archives/2006/apr06/Celosia.html.

4The Flower Expert (n.d.). Cockscomb. Retrieved May 26, 2014, from http://www.theflowerexpert.com/content/growingflowers/flowersandseasons/cockscomb.

5Wikipedia (2013, September 10). Ascocoryne sarcoides. Retrieved May 26, 2014, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ascocoryne_sarcoides.

6Wikipedia (2013, June 22). Clathrus archeri. Retrieved May 26, 2014, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clathrus_archeri.

7NYU Langone Medical Center (2014). He Shou Wu. Retrieved May 26, 2014, from http://www.med.nyu.edu/content?ChunkIID=21716.

8Hilty, J. (2014, May 9). Doll's Eyes (Actaea pachypoda). Retrieved May 26, 2014, from http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/woodland/plants/doll_eyes.htm.

9Project Noah (2011, October 11). Chocolate tube slime mold (hairy stemonitis). Retrieved from http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/7514042.

10Brown, A. (2012, December 28). What creeps and crawls, has no brain, but is intelligent?Retrieved from http://greatecology.com/creeps-crawls-brain-intelligent/.

11Barone, J. (2008, December 9). Slime Molds Show Surprising Degree of Intelligence. Retrieved from http://discovermagazine.com/2009/jan/071#.UNiAHHetvmk.

12Kup, M. (2011, April). Stinkhorns: The Phallaceae and Clathraceae. Retrieved from http://www.mushroomexpert.com/phallaceae.html.

13Voon, H. C., Bhat, R., & Rusul, G. (2012). Flower Extracts and Their Essential Oils as Potential Antimicrobial Agents for Food Uses and Pharmaceutical Applications.Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety, 11(1), 34-55. Retrieved from DOI: 10.1111/j.1541-4337.2011.00169.x.

What's In A Name? Locations With Names Associated With Plants and Fungi

show route and directions
A markerBouquet, France -
Bouquet, France
get directions

B markerFloral, Arkansas -
Floral, AR, USA
get directions

C markerFungi Passage, Virgin Islands National Park -
Fungi Passage, Virgin Islands National Park
get directions

D markerFungus Lake, Minnesota -
Fungus Lake, Superior National Forest, West Cook, MN, USA
get directions

E markerRoot, Indiana -
Root, IN, USA
get directions

F markerRoot, New York -
Root, NY, USA
get directions

G markerSlime, Croatia -
Slime, Croatia
get directions

H markerSpore, Poland -
Spore, Poland
get directions

I markerStem, North Carolina -
Stem, NC, USA
get directions

Mother Nature: Not Ready For Retirement Just Yet

Ma Nature is not ready for retirement just yet.  She's having too much fun.  Always go out on your own terms.
Ma Nature is not ready for retirement just yet. She's having too much fun. Always go out on your own terms. | Source

© 2014 FlourishAnyway

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    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 19 months ago from USA

      rajan - This one took so much research and I was very surprised myself by many. Nature is certainly no accident! Thank you for visiting and for your words of support.

    • rajan jolly profile image

      Rajan Singh Jolly 19 months ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Extremely interesting. Though I had an idea of a couple of these this hub certainly shows nature cannot be beaten anyway. Her creations are masterpieces. Thanks for the hub and a well deserved HOTD

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Jeannie - Glad you enjoyed my middle school humor!

    • Jeannieinabottle profile image

      Jeannie InABottle 2 years ago from Baltimore, MD

      Ewwww.... gross! Actually this was pretty fun. I never realized there were so many disgusting and/or inappropriate naturally occurring things in nature. ;-)

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      colorfulone - There are some Devil's Fingers that grow during the summer under a tree in a common area in my neighborhood. Until I researched these for the hub, I had no idea what they were. I had a strange fixation on the things that looked like evil hands growing out of the ground. Then they shrivel up and look really awful, like a shrunken devil. Next summer I need to take my own photo and add it to this hub. I was going to do so this past year, but someone stomped on them. Kids. Thanks for visiting, voting, and sharing!

    • colorfulone profile image

      Susie Lehto 2 years ago from Minnesota

      Another very interesting bub. Those Devil’s Fingers are really something else. Its crazy how odd some plants looks some weirdly familiar.

      Voting and and sharing.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      thoughtfulgirl2 - Thanks for reading and commenting. Have a great day.

    • profile image

      thoughtfulgirl2 2 years ago

      Interesting hub. I have also noticed that nature mimics human form in a variety of ways.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      mySuccess8 - I appreciate your kind compliments. Thank you for reading, and have a wonderful new year.

    • mySuccess8 profile image

      mySuccess8 2 years ago

      How some plants and fungi have a striking resemblance to body parts is amazing. Your selection and the photos are spectacular. You have made this even more interesting by describing the health and medicinal benefits of some of them. Congrats on Hub of the Day!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Paradise7 - Thank you for the warm kudos. I appreciate your stopping by. Have a wonderful New Year filled with peace and prosperity.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      David - I sure wish I could tell you, but I don't know. Thanks for reading.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      oceansnsunsets - Thanks for taking the time to leave me a comment! Glad you enjoyed this! Have a fabulous 2015!

    • oceansnsunsets profile image

      Paula 2 years ago from The Midwest, USA

      Oh my goodness! I couldn't believe this hub, and the pictures plants, flowers and fungi were too crazy to be true! Wow, well captured and relayed, and very fun too with the blame put on mother nature! Kind of fun, and eye opening at the same time. Thank you for sharing, this was a lot of fun and a bit crazy at time! Very entertaining.

    • David Trujillo profile image

      David Trujillo Uribe 2 years ago from Medellin, Colombia

      Now you got to tell me the song of that Youtube video!!

    • Paradise7 profile image

      Paradise7 2 years ago from Upstate New York

      Terrific hub, awesome pics, great copy, what can I say! you also made me laugh several times, while conveying some excellent information. Happy New Year to you my friend, and all the best.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Vicki - Thanks so much! Glad you enjoyed it! Have a great 2015!

    • Victoria Lynn profile image

      Victoria Lynn 2 years ago from Arkansas, USA

      Oh, my! How interesting--and funny! Good job! And congrats on HOTD!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
      Author

      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Craan - It would make for an interesting death certificate, huh? Thanks for stopping by!

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Heidi - What an awesome surprise! Thanks for stopping by!

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Bill - Thanks so much!

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      greatstuff - Thank you for reading and taking the time to comment. Ginseng does look like grarled, knobby arms and toes.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Larry - What a surprise this was! Thanks for stopping by again, Larry! Have a terrific New Year!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      pstraubie48 - Thanks so much. Angels back to you! Have a great 2015!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      ologsinquito - Thanks so much! Have a terrific day!

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      PegCole17 - Thanks for stopping by again! Have a Happy New Year, my friend!

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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      Arachnea - Thank you so much! Have a great day and a Happy New Year!

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      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Just dropped by again to say congrats on the HOTD. I love it when good writers win one of these. :)

    • heidithorne profile image

      Heidi Thorne 2 years ago from Chicago Area

      So many of your hubs are funny and informative... and this one didn't disappoint. Big congrats on Hub of the Day! Well deserved.

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      Sheila Craan 2 years ago from Florida

      This is mind boggling and a tad embarrassing if I'd have to explain a certain fungal plant or root to a child. I imagine God simply enjoys creating off the wall stuff that can make an adult chuckle and wonder. Those devil fingers were scary. If only the brain looking fungal plants were nourishing, too bad they are deadly. I mean someone could innocently commit suicide by eating some of these plants and no one would ever know, since it will seem natural and not an overdose of some pill or medication. Who would suspect these plants were deadly?

    • greatstuff profile image

      Mazlan 2 years ago from Malaysia

      Mother Nature not only makes plants that look like body parts, she has also created plants that resemble the complete human body. Ginseng is one example. It's gnarled root look like human body with stringy arms and legs...scary!

      Great hub; and congrats on your HOTD.

    • Larry Rankin profile image

      Larry Rankin 2 years ago from Oklahoma

      I had read this article a few months ago and enjoyed it immensely. I was excited to see it win HOTD. Congratulations! Very well written and researched, and your photos are excellent.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 2 years ago from sunny Florida

      Congrats of HOTD "Flourish"

      Can I just say eeeeeewwwww?

      Mother Nature surely has a sense of humor!!! Many of these I have not seen before...the 'eyes' have it....and how tempting they would be to a little one.

      Angels are on the way to you this morning ps

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      ologsinquito 2 years ago from USA

      Flourish, congratulations on HOTD!

    • PegCole17 profile image

      Peg Cole 2 years ago from Dallas, Texas

      Congratulations on earning the Hub of the Day award for this outstanding piece. Still funny on the second round of reading. Your sources, photos and information was truly educational.

    • Arachnea profile image

      Tanya Jones 2 years ago from Texas USA

      Great hub! I've shared it on my tsu page. I really appreciate the reference list you provided at the end. Also sharing on G+.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image
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      FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

      vespawoolf - Thanks for stopping by. They are quite shocking, huh? Have a great weekend!

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      vespawoolf 2 years ago from Peru, South America

      This is quite a collection of strange-looking fungi, flowers and plants. Many of them I´d never read about before. The only pretty one is the lady-part flower! Very interesting. Thank you for sharing.

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      CatherineGiordano - Glad you enjoyed this! Have a great week!

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      Catherine Giordano 3 years ago from Orlando Florida

      Outstanding. This piece has everything. it begins with a grabber of a photo and title and keeps getting better. Voting Up and I, E, A

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Zeinab - Thanks for voting, sharing and leaving a comment. Nature definitely has some strange ways of expressing herself sometimes.

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      Musu Bangura 3 years ago from Nation's Capital

      Yuck. LOL! Nature can deliver some interesting things sometimes. I've never come across any of these types of plants so seeing info like this is really something! I will definitely be passing this along and voting up!

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Cesky - Way! Glad you liked this. Have a great Sunday.

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      Cecilia Karanja 3 years ago from Nairobi

      There's no way you the Purple Jellydisc Fungi are not intestines. No way. :-)

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Sunshine625 - I could've sworn there were those devil finger things in my neighborhood about a month ago in a common area. Then someone came along and stomped them all before I could find a convenient time to stop and get a close up look and photograph. Thanks for reading and taking the time to comment on this and my profile photo. Sending hugs to Florida!

    • Sunshine625 profile image

      Linda Bilyeu 3 years ago from Orlando, FL

      LOL! I had one of those top photo "fungis" growing in my yard last month...then another popped up. They were so Ew!!! Since Florida gets a lot of rain in the summer, we have some funky fungi that sprout up. I'm allergic to mold, so my allergies suffer. But, there are some pretty unique fungi. I do like cauliflower, never realized it looked like a brain! Also...I like your new pretty profile picture! :)

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      poetryman6969 - Yes, the geoduck is a strange looking clam species. Thanks for stopping by.

    • poetryman6969 profile image

      poetryman6969 3 years ago

      Geoduck.

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Nadine - Thanks for stopping by. Nature is creepy and repetitive in places, too! Have a great weekend!

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      Nadine May 3 years ago from Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa

      This was both a funny post but very informative at the same time. You are so right that a Cauliflower looks like a brain! Never knew that some Fungi could look so ...sometimes creepy. Awesome!

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      KoffeeKlatch Gals - Thanks for reading!

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      Susan Haze 3 years ago from Sunny Florida

      awesome. hahaha I loved it.

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      grand old lady - I think you may be right. Thanks for stopping by!

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      Mona Sabalones Gonzalez 3 years ago from Philippines

      I'm thinking, you don't need to travel far to see the wonders of the world. Just look in your garden, or read this article on Hub Pages. Lol.

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Audrey - Thanks for stopping by! Glad you enjoyed this.

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      Audrey Howitt 3 years ago from California

      Loved this! How fun!

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Cyndi10 - Thank you for stopping by! I appreciate the upvote and the share! Have a great day!

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Rebecca - Sometimes the obvious is right before our very eyes! Weird, huh?!? Thanks for stopping by!

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      Cynthia B Turner 3 years ago from Georgia

      Now that was a lot of information about some very odd looking plants. It was fun to read. Those pictures of mother nature can't be topped. Very, very clever article. Voted up and sharing!

    • rebeccamealey profile image

      Rebecca Mealey 3 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

      This is so entertaining! I never thought about it, but your're right, cauliflower does indeed look like a brain. Love this!

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      livingsta - Thanks for the compliment and for sharing.

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      livingsta 3 years ago from United Kingdom

      Wow, this was an awesome read. I have never heard of these before, and I found them quite amusing added with your sense of humour. Thank you for sharing this with us. Voted up and sharing :-)

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      LadyFiddler - It does make you wonder, doesn't it?

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      Joanna Chandler 3 years ago from On planet Earth

      LOL they sure do have some resemblance :)

      Have a great week and keep flourishing

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Jackie - Glad you enjoyed these. They are strange and compelling to behold.

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 3 years ago from The Beautiful South

      I am aware of a few of these like the weird mushrooms that you can find out and about (well fungi) and I love getting pictures of the weird stuff. Some I have not seen so thank you for a fun and interesting read!

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Carolyn - I'm glad you enjoyed these odd and sometimes shocking plants and fungi. I hope the wee folk and fairy lovers get a kick of of them. Thanks for reading and sharing. Have a great weekend!

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      Carolyn Emerick 3 years ago

      This article was not only interesting, but you made me giggle throughout! I had heard of some of them, but many of the plants you mentioned were new to me. Upvoted and sharing here on HP and also on a FB page called Wee Folk and Hidden People because those fairy lovers really love mushrooms and plants too ;-)

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Monis Mas - Thanks for reading. Have a great weekend.

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      Aga 3 years ago

      Very entertaining hub! I do go Ewww about some of these LOL!

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Rozalyn - Thank you! I appreciate the read.

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      Rozalyn Winters 3 years ago

      You've got a fantastic sense of humor! :-)

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      angryelf - Mother Nature has created some intriguing works of art. Thanks a bunch for sharing, voting, and reading.

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      angryelf 3 years ago from Tennessee

      Really awesome hub! Very entertaining! Voted up for sure, and shared on Facebook :)

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Larry - They were a little short for words when I asked. Thanks for reading and sharing. Have a great day!

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      Larry Rankin 3 years ago from Oklahoma

      Wonderfully fun:) I think to be fair, you should ask the plants. Maybe they think we are the ones copying them. Thank you so much for such an entertaining read.

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Sharkye11 - Thanks for reading and viewing Mother Nature's works of art. She sure has been a busy gal. I appreciate the compliment.

    • Sharkye11 profile image

      Jayme Kinsey 3 years ago from Oklahoma

      This was hilarious and educational! I would love to grow some of these! I really enjoyed your style here. Great way to get people into science!

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Faith Reaper - They knocked my socks off too, especially being more of an animal person. Glad you enjoyed Mother Nature's visual trickery. Have a great week, and enjoy your well deserved day off.

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      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Oh my is right!!! What an eye-opener of a hub here, Flourish. You find the most interesting topics to write about and this is certainly at the top of the charts lol ... I found this fascinating as to each unique characteristic or ability of the plant or fungi lol. The only one I knew of is cauliflower. Those Devil Fingers are really something ... EWW is right. Amazing photos! Love your humor interjected throughout, which makes this even more of an entertaining read.

      I am enjoying the day off today and this hub was perfect to read this day : )

      Up and more and away

      Have a great week ahead.

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Hady Chahine - I thought the Devil's FIngers nearly looked like Satan himself was crawling out of the ground. Jeepers. Thanks for stopping by!

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Rochelle - Feel free to use the idea of putting the url on the photo. I figure it goes along with Hub "marketing," especially on Pinterest.

    • Rochelle Frank profile image

      Rochelle Frank 3 years ago from California Gold Country

      I also like the way you put your site info in your photo. I might have to borrow that idea.

    • Hady Chahine profile image

      Hady Chahine 3 years ago from Manhattan Beach

      Great hub! So perfect for Halloween, given all the creepy content. In particular the "Devil's Fingers" and "Heart-Stoppers" gave me the chills.

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Peggy W - Thanks for stopping by and for tweeting, sharing, and pinning. That's awesome of you to do all that sharing. I spent about a week researching these plants and fungi and was so surprised at what Ma Nature has been hiding from those of us who aren't exactly green thumbs. Have a great weekend.

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      Peggy Woods 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

      What an amazing array of plants and fungus which grows in various interesting ways...to say the least! I enjoyed reading this and seeing the photos. Mother Nature definitely has a sense of humor and so do you with those older gal photos you also added to this hub. Pinning this to my plants board, tweeting and sharing on HP.

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Peg - Glad you enjoyed Mother Nature's bawdy sense of humor. Have a great weekend.

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      mary615 - It took quite a bunch of researching. I got the idea when my daughter and I were walking in the woods at a stat park and we spotted a tree with a growth that looked like someone's rear end. We knew right then Mother Nature had a sense of humor. Thanks for sharing and taking enjoy your weekend.

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      Peg Cole 3 years ago from Dallas, Texas

      It's bizarre! They really look like body parts. Incredible photos and interesting facts here. Fun and funny!

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      Mary Hyatt 3 years ago from Florida

      I am just speechless! It must have taken you days to research and get all these wonderful photos for this Hub.

      I can't decide which of these "plants" impresses me the most!

      Voted UP, shared all around, including Google+

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Techygran - Thank you for reading and taking the time to leave a comment.

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      Cynthia 3 years ago from Vancouver Island, Canada

      Excellent! How very interesting!

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      oldiesmusic - I can almost see that! Thanks for stopping by.

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      oldiesmusic 3 years ago from United States

      Oh what a shame... these brain-like fungi would have been perfect for Halloween party dinners. :))

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Heidi - Thanks for visiting and sharing. I'm pretty much a brown thumb but these plants and fungi certain are head-turners. Have a great weekend.

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      Heidi Thorne 3 years ago from Chicago Area

      This should be a hit with our plant lovers! Really unique topic! Sharing with some of my gardening pals.

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      moonlake - I like the slime mold too, especially all the unknown "talents" it has. Who knew? Thanks for stopping by, and have a terrific weekend.

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      moonlake 3 years ago from America

      I love the Purple Jellydisc Fungi so gross. We have baneberry growing in our woods I'm always trying to keep the dog away from the berries. I didn't know they were called doll's eyes. Voted up.

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      Sha - That's a good idea. I could imagine how rowdy and intrigued the class would be. Have a good weekend.

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      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      prasetio30 - Thanks for stopping by. Glad you learned something and were entertained, too.