AcademiaAgriculture & FarmingHumanitiesSocial SciencesSTEM

Fascinating Facts about Octopuses - Adorable, Dumbo and a Genome

Updated on September 07, 2015
AliciaC profile image

Linda Crampton is a teacher with an honours degree in biology. She loves to study nature and write about animals and plants.

This picture of a dumbo octopus represents the first time that coiled arms (or legs) were seen in this species.
This picture of a dumbo octopus represents the first time that coiled arms (or legs) were seen in this species. | Source

Fascinating Octopuses

Octopuses are fascinating invertebrates. At least some species have the intelligence that we normally associate with vertebrates. Octopuses have a different body structure from vertebrates, yet they can sense and manipulate objects very effectively. Researchers continue to discover new facts about these impressive and unusual animals.

Three especially interesting octopuses live off the coast of California. One lacks an official name but is sometimes described as adorable due to its cute appearance. The dumbo octopus reminds observers of the Disney cartoon character known as Dumbo the Elephant. Scientists have recently sequenced the genome of the California two-spot octopus and have found that it contains some very unusual features.

Octopuses or Octopi?

The word "octopus" comes from Ancient Greek and means "eight legs". Some people have assumed that the word octopus is derived from Latin, which would make its plural form "octopi". Since this assumption is incorrect, octopi is technically the wrong plural form of octopus.

The blue-ringed octopus of Australia and Indonesia exists as several species and has a deadly bite. It's thought to be the only octopus that is dangerous to humans. This is Hapalochlaena maculosa.
The blue-ringed octopus of Australia and Indonesia exists as several species and has a deadly bite. It's thought to be the only octopus that is dangerous to humans. This is Hapalochlaena maculosa. | Source

Features of an Octopus

Most octopuses have some features in common. Since not all octopuses are well known and new species are still being discovered, there may be some that break the following "rules".

  • All octopuses live in the ocean.
  • They have a soft body (to a greater or lesser extent) with eight arms. In most species the arms have suckers.
  • The arms of an octopus surround its mouth. The mouth contains a tough, parrot-like beak that is used to kill prey and tear it apart. Inside the beak is a tongue-like radula covered with rasping teeth.
  • All octopuses have a venomous bite, which is some cases produces painful results. Only the blue-ringed octopus is dangerous to humans, however. Its bite is deadly and its venom kills rapidly.
  • The sac-like body covering behind the head of an octopus is known as the mantle. The vital organs are located under the mantle.
  • Many octopuses release ink from an ink sac when they are threatened. Octopus ink contains concentrated melanin, the same pigment that colours our skin and hair. The release of a cloud of ink confuses predators, allowing the octopus to escape.

The common octopus, or Octopus vulgaris, in the Mediterranean Sea
The common octopus, or Octopus vulgaris, in the Mediterranean Sea | Source

More Octopus Features

  • Most octopuses have a well developed eye which has an iris, a lens and a retina, like our eyes. Octopus eyes are believed to have evolved independently from those of humans.
  • Octopuses breathe by means of gills. Water enters the body through an opening at the bottom of the mantle, flows over the gills and then leaves the body through a tube called the siphon. The siphon can be seen on the side of an octopus's body. The gills extract oxygen from the water and give up carbon dioxide.
  • An octopus has three hearts.
  • The blood of an octopus is blue. The pigment in the blood is called hemocyanin and contains copper. The pigment in our blood is called hemoglobin. It's red in colour and contains iron.
  • Octopuses move by crawling over the ground or by swimming. Some swim by a type of jet propulsion. They absorb water through the opening in their mantle and then expel it forcefully through their siphon.
  • At least two thirds of an octopus's neurons, or nerve cells, enter its arms. The arms can even perform jobs when separated from an octopus (for a limited time).
  • At least some octopus species can solve problems and puzzles, learn new things and use tools.

The East Pacific red octopus (Octopus rubescens) can be found off the coast of California and in other areas.
The East Pacific red octopus (Octopus rubescens) can be found off the coast of California and in other areas. | Source

Octopus Reproduction

  • During mating, the male inserts a packet of sperm into the female's body with a specialized arm called a hectocotylus. Sometimes he detaches the arm with its sperm and gives it to the female to store until later.
  • Fertlization takes place inside the female's body.
  • Once the eggs are laid, the female cares for them until they hatch. She then leaves the youngsters to their fate.
  • Sadly, octopuses don't live for very long. Some of the larger ones may live as long as five years, but that seems to be the maximum lifespan and isn't often attained. Some octopuses live for only six months. Females die soon after the eggs have hatched. Males die soon after reproduction as well.

Suborders in the Order Octopoda

Octopuses belong to the order Octopoda, which contains two suborders. Members of the suborder Cirrata have fins on their mantle and an internal shell. Members of the suborder Incirrata lack fins and an internal shell.

An Octopus That is Adorable

The Adorable Octopus - Possibly Opisthoteuthis adorabilis

The "adorable" octopus lives in the deep water of Monterey Bay in California. It doesn't have an official scientific or common name yet, even though the animal has been known since 1990. The name Opisthoteuthis adorabilis has been suggested. After studying the features of the octopus, scientists are certain that it should be classified in the genus Opisthoteuthis. They haven't decided on its species, however.

The octopus is small and delicate. It could definitely be classified as cute. It's pale to dark orange in colour and has a gelatinous and fragile body. The octopus also has large eyes, a feature that probably helps it to see in the dark water of its natural habitat. Its arms are short and webbed. There is a small fin located high up on each side of its mantle. The octopus spreads the web between its arms like a parachute and uses its fins to help it steer as it swims. The "parachute" is a feature of the family Opisthoteuthidae. Members of the family are known as umbrella octopuses.

Stephanie Bush is a scientist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. She is the researcher that has been most involved in the study of the octopus and came up with the idea of the "adorabilis" name. The final decision about the species name of the octopus will be hers.

Egg Development

The eggs of the adorable octopus take two and a half to three years to hatch. This long time period is common for the eggs of deep sea animals. The eggs have to develop in a cold environment under high pressure.

A dumbo octopus preparing to swim
A dumbo octopus preparing to swim | Source

The Dumbo Octopus - Grimpoteuthis

Dumbo octopuses belong to the genus Grimpoteuthis. There are seventeen or eighteen specIes. They live in many places around the world in addition to California. Dumbo octopuses belong to the same family as the adorable octopus and have certain features in common with them, including the webbed arms and the fins. The fins of a dumbo octopus are long and substantial, however, and often look quite peculiar to people who are not familiar with the animal.

Like the adorable octopus, dumbo octopuses are small animals that live in deep water and have large eyes. They generally don't have the delicate appearance of the adorable octopus, however.

The dumbo octopus has a U-shaped shell inside its mantle. This means that its body is not completely soft and that it can't squeeze through small spaces, unlike the finless octopuses. The shell often gives the mantle a smooth and slightly bulbous appearance.

Dumbo the Elephant

Dumbo is a cartoon character in a 1941 Walt Disney movie of the same name. Dumbo has huge ears. He discovers that he can use his ears like wings and can fly.

A Dumbo Octopus Swimming in Deep and Cold Water

The Life of a Dumbo Octopus

Dumbo octopuses are predators, like other octopuses. They feed on worms, crustaceans, shellfish and copepods. They have a beak but may or may not have a radula. They usually swallow their prey whole.

Dumbo octopuses move by crawling over the ocean bottom and by swimming. They flap their fins and sometimes fold and unfold their "umbrella" as they swim. Their movements are often slow and graceful. They can use their siphon and the jet propulsion method favoured by finless octopuses if necessary, however.

The female dumbo octopus receives sperm from a male. Fertlization is internal. There is some evidence that the female contains eggs at different stages of development and can lay eggs at any time of the year.

Dumbo Octopus in Action

Finned Octopuses

The adorable octopus, dumbo octopuses and other members of the finned suborder don't produce ink. There may be other major differences between them and the octopuses without fins. Finned octopuses are poorly understood at the moment.

The California Two-Spot Octopus - Octopus bimaculoides

The California two-spot octopus is a finless octopus. It's found in many locations, including California. Adults are variable in colour. They commonly have a mottled yellow, brown or grey appearance.

The name of the octopus comes from a large eye spot or ocellus below and slightly behind each eye. The ocellus consists of a black background containing a blue ring. It's more visible at some times than at others. For example, in the video below the ocellus can be seen at the start of the video and then disappears.

Like the other members of its suborder, the California two-spot octopus hides in a den when it's not hunting. It's a predator and eats crustaceans such as crabs and lobsters, mollusks and small fish. The octopus is also known as the bimac octopus and is sometimes kept as a pet.

California Two-Spot Octopus off Catalina Island

What is a Genome?

A genome is the complete set of genes in an organism. A gene is a section of a DNA molecule with a specific function. A single DNA molecule contains many genes and there are multiple DNA molecules in a cell. All the cells in an organism - with the exception of the eggs and sperm - contain identical DNA molecules. Not all of the genes in the DNA are active in a particular cell, however.

The Genome of the California Two-Spot Octopus

Scientists have jokingly said that the unusual genome of the California two-spot octopus comes from "something like an alien" in order to emphasize its intriguing nature. Octopuses aren't aliens from space, despite the claims of some publications, but their genome does have some unexpected features.

  • The genome of the California two-spot octopus is nearly as large as a human's. In addition, it contains 33,000 genes that code for proteins. The human genome contains fewer than 25,000 protein-coding genes.
  • The octopus genome contains 168 protocadherin genes, which is more than twice as many as humans. These genes are very important in the development of the nervous system and in the interaction of neurons.
  • A gene family with the interesting name of zinc-finger transcription factors is greatly expanded in the octopus genome. The family contains about 1,800 genes in octopuses. These genes are thought to be important in octopus development.
  • Researchers have found six genes that code for proteins called reflectins. These proteins control how light is reflected from the skin, thereby altering the appearance of the octopus.

A Section of a DNA or Deoxyribonucleic Acid Molecule

This is a section of a DNA molecule. DNA contains four bases - adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine. The order of the bases on one strand of DNA forms the genetic code.
This is a section of a DNA molecule. DNA contains four bases - adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine. The order of the bases on one strand of DNA forms the genetic code. | Source

More Octopus Genome Discoveries

  • The octopus genome shows that some of the animal's tissues have the ability to edit RNA (ribonucleic acid). DNA can't leave the nucleus of a cell. The ribosomes that make protein are located outside the nucleus, however. Normally, the DNA code in the nucleus is sent via RNA to the ribosomes, which make protein by reading the RNA code. If octopus proteins need to be changed, this can done by quickly changing the code in the RNA. The DNA doesn't have to be altered.
  • Octopuses have a large number of transposons, or jumping genes, that move around in the genome.
  • Genes that are active in the suckers of an octopus control the production of a protein that resembles the acetylcholine receptor in humans. Acetylcholine is a vital chemical in humans that controls the transmission of a nerve impulse from one neuron to another. Acetylcholine must bind to receptors on the surface of neurons in order to do its job. Researchers think that in the octopus the receptors are involved in the ability of the suckers to taste.

California Two-Spot Octopus Eggs Hatching

The Importance of Learning More about Octopuses

Octopuses are fascinating animals to observe and study. They are very unusual invertebrates and are an important part of their ecosystem. It's interesting and educational to learn about their lives and behaviour.

One of the amazing things about life on Earth is that all living things contain DNA and that genes work in the same way throughout the living world. The only entities that don't have DNA are some viruses. They do contain a genome, but it's made of RNA instead of DNA. This similarity between life forms means that by exploring DNA in other organisms - especially the more complex animals like octopuses - we may learn something that applies to our own genome. That's an intriguing thought.

Further Reading

  • An analysis of the genome of the California two-spot octopus

© 2015 Linda Crampton

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Buildreps profile image

      Buildreps 17 months ago from Europe

      What an astounding beautiful article, Linda. You've provided so much details and so much facts about octopi:) that my head is dazzling. Thanks for this greatness.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you very much for such a kind comment, Buildreps! I appreciate your visit and comment a great deal.

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 17 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Well we have no shortage of them in the Puget Sound, that's for sure. Great information here, as always.

    • Susan Hambidge profile image

      Susan Hambidge 17 months ago from Hertfordshire, England

      This is really good hub, I love the adorable octopus!

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Hi, Bill. Thanks for the comment. I always appreciate your visit.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you very much, Susan. I like the adorable octopus, too!

    • Larry Rankin profile image

      Larry Rankin 17 months ago from Oklahoma

      Such interesting looking animals. I didn't realize they were venomous. I'm always learning something new about our planet.

      Wonderfully done!

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Hi, Larry. Thank you very much for the comment. I think that nature is very interesting!

    • m abdullah javed profile image

      muhammad abdullah javed 17 months ago

      Linda you took us to the depth of ocean with your beautiful description of octopi ☺, I was expecting you would say in what ways the octopuses are useful in future predictions? Anyway it's a wonderful and interesting hub. Thanks.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you very much for the visit, m abdullah javed. I appreciate your visit.

    • AudreyHowitt profile image

      Audrey Howitt 17 months ago from California

      What a fabulous article Linda!! You should be proud! Sharing!

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you for such a kind comment, Audrey! I appreciate your comment and the share very, very much.

    • PegCole17 profile image

      Peg Cole 17 months ago from Dallas, Texas

      Fascinating article and interesting facts about these amazing creatures. I had read somewhere that they were intelligent but to learn that they can solve puzzles is incredible. You did a great job in making this interesting.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you very much, Peg. Octopuses are certainly amazing!

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 17 months ago from England

      Hi Alicia, I am a great fan of Octopus, I love them because of their great intelligence, so this was fascinating reading! great article, voted up and shared! nell

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Hi, Nell. Thanks so much for the comment, the vote and the share! I'm a great fan of the octopus, too.

    • drbj profile image

      drbj and sherry 17 months ago from south Florida

      What a fascinating trip into the world of these unusual octopuses, Alicia. I learned many new facts and enjoyed the videos immensely. Now how did scientists discover that some of these species could solve puzzles?

      This is an exceptional Hub, m'dear and more than deserves its Up.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you very much for the lovely comment and the vote, drbj! Most of the work on octopus intelligence has been done on captive animals. Octopuses can do all sorts of interesting things! Describing them would make a hub in itself. I might write about them some time.

    • Mel Carriere profile image

      Mel Carriere 17 months ago from San Diego California

      As usual this was fascinating and educational stuff. I wish I had been paying more attention when I went to Catalina. Great hub.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thanks, Mel. I appreciate your visit and comment, as always.

    • BlossomSB profile image

      Bronwen Scott-Branagan 17 months ago from Victoria, Australia

      Such an interesting article - thank you! Also for clearing up the octopuses/ octopi dilemma. In Australia we also have blue-ringed ones that are poisonous, but quite pretty.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Hi, Blossom. Thank you very much for the comment! I think the blue-ringed octopus is pretty, too.

    • Rachel L Alba profile image

      Rachel L Alba 17 months ago from Every Day Cooking and Baking

      Amazing! I never knew that there were so many different kinds of octopuses. I loved the video with the babies being hatched. Also the Dumbo octopus was indeed adorable. If I could I would give this a high vote.

      Blessings to you.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you very much, Rachel. I appreciate your visit and the kind comment! Blessings to you, as well.

    • bdegiulio profile image

      Bill De Giulio 17 months ago from Massachusetts

      Wonderful hub Linda. I was not aware that there was a Dumbo Octopus. How cute. As always thank you for the education. Have a great weekend.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you so much for the visit and comment, Bill. I hope you have a great weekend, too.

    • thumbi7 profile image

      JR Krishna 17 months ago from India

      Wow! so much information on octopuses. I never knew eggs of octopuses take long time to hatch.

      Though the name is 'dumbo' I like the color of it

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Hi, thumbi7. Yes, octopus eggs in deep water can take a surprising long time to hatch! I like the appearance of dumbo octopuses, too. Thanks for the comment.

    • peachpurple profile image

      peachy 17 months ago from Home Sweet Home

      Fascinating pictures

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 17 months ago from southern USA

      Incredible article, Linda. They are certainly fascinating animals. I never knew they have three hearts! That one eye is creepy to me along with those eight arms with suctions ...however, the Dumbo one is truly adorable.

      Sharing everywhere

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you very much, peachpurple.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you so much, Faith. I appreciate your comment and shares a great deal! Octopus eyes are certainly interesting.

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 17 months ago from Massachusetts, USA

      What an interesting article. You have given context and character to a fascinating creature that is often feared, but misunderstood. I loved the videos as well in this beautifully crafted hub.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you very much, Genna. I appreciate the kind comment. I think that octopuses are fascinating, too. I wish they lived longer.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 17 months ago from Stillwater, OK

      These are lovely and fascinating. There is so much that remains to be known about the deep sea and its inhabitants. Thanks for sharing one of the most interesting parts of it.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 17 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Hi, Deb. I agree - ocean life is certainly fascinating, especially deep sea life. Thanks for the comment.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 16 months ago from USA

      Now we know the appropriate plural and why! Thanks for all the fascinating facts about these creatures. Three hearts. Who knew?

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 16 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Hi, Flourish. Thank you very much for the visit and the comment!

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 16 months ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Informative and most interesting.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 16 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thanks for the comment, Devika.

    • Express10 profile image

      H C Palting 15 months ago from East Coast

      I would love to see these creatures in the wild. Some commenters are lucky enough to be able to do so. It's a bit sad that they have such short lifespans. Thank you so much for the details and effort you put into providing to us about these fascinating creatures.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 15 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you very much for the visit and the comment, Express10. I think it's sad that the animals live for such a short time, too.

    • stuff4kids profile image

      Amanda Littlejohn 15 months ago

      An extraordinarily informative article about these astonishing cephalopod molluscs and adorned with such beautiful photographs! You've clearly done a lot of research here and it makes for a fabulous read.

      I understand that one of the most extraordinary features of these animals is their apparent intelligence. At least among the larger members of the family.

      I really enjoyed reading this - thank you so much!

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 15 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you very much for such a kind comment, stuff4kids! I appreciate your visit. The intelligence of some octopuses is very interesting. They are fascinating animals.

    • Scribenet profile image

      Scribenet 15 months ago from Ontario, Canada

      What a fascinating creature. Some even manage to look cute! Very interesting biology. They are the real blue-bloods...lol.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 15 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thanks for the comment, Scribenet. I think that some octopuses look cute, too!

    • truthfornow profile image

      truthfornow 15 months ago from New Orleans, LA

      I had no idea that there were so many different species. Very fascinating and informative.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 15 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you, truthfornow. I appreciate your visit and comment.

    • poetryman6969 profile image

      poetryman6969 15 months ago

      A fascinating article. Some think that the octopus can tell us something about how a non-human intelligence would approach the world.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 15 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thanks, poetryman. It's very interesting to think about what the octopus could teach us.

    • sgbrown profile image

      Sheila Brown 15 months ago from Southern Oklahoma

      I have always been fascinated by octopus. You gave so much interesting information here and the videos are great!

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 15 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you very much for the visit and the kind comment, Sheila.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 14 months ago from sunny Florida

      This should be entitled Everything You Do Not Know About the Octopus :D

      I thought I knew thing or two about this amazing creature ...however, there was so much you filled in that I had no idea about.

      The adorabilis is a cutie pie..the video was amazing....

      Thank you for sharing such a fine tuned hub with us.

      Angels are on the way to you this early morning hour ps

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 14 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you for the lovely comment, Patricia. I appreciate it a great deal. As always, I'm grateful for the angels as well!

    • ignugent17 13 months ago

      Great information. It is my first time to see the image of this kind of octopus. Thanks for sharing. :-)

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 13 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thanks for the visit and the comment, ignugent17!

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 12 months ago from The Beautiful South

      I have always been fascinated by the octopus. You could never convince me that such complex beauties as these just happened. Not in a million years.

      You did a great job!

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 12 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you, Jackie. I've been fascinated by octopuses for a long time, too. They are very interesting animals.

    • Thelma Alberts profile image

      Thelma Alberts 10 months ago from Germany

      Congratulations on the HOTD! This is a fascinating hub with lots of informations. Thanks for sharing AliciaC.

    • Kristen Howe profile image

      Kristen Howe 10 months ago from Northeast Ohio

      Linda, congrats on another HOTD! You're on a roll. This is a fascinating hub on octopuses and those different kinds that I never heard of. Real interesting and amazing to know all about them. Thanks for sharing.

    • RTalloni profile image

      RTalloni 10 months ago from the short journey

      Congrats on your Hub of the Day award for this very interesting post on a sea creature that has always creeped me out. I don't have many fears about the ocean, but encountering an octopus has always been one.

      Now, I do feel a bit differently.

      I knew there had to be different sorts but had never taken the time to explore them. Your introduction to these was a neat read. Heeeheheeeee on the aliens from outer-space concept!

      Thanks for more insight into these truly fascinating creatures of the deep. The answers yet to come to researchers prove how little we now know about the infinite mysteries of physical life on earth. The fact that we are able to do such detailed research in this day and time is an amazement in and of itself!

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 10 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you very much for the congratulations, Thelma. I appreciate your visit.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 10 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Hi, Kristen. Thanks for the congrats. I always appreciate your visits and comments.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 10 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Hi, RTalloni. Yes, octopuses are fascinating creatures. It's wonderful that we are developing better ways to learn about them. I agree with you - there is almost certainly much more to discover about life on Earth! Thank you for the congrats.

    • swilliams profile image

      Emunah La Paz 10 months ago from Arizona

      What an insightful article! I don't find octopuses to be cute, however I can see the similarity found in the Dumbo Octopuses, to be similar to the Disney Character. Great article!

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 10 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you very much for the visit and the comment, swilliams!

    • bdegiulio profile image

      Bill De Giulio 10 months ago from Massachusetts

      Congratulations Linda. Always an education. Thank you.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 10 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Thank you, Bill. I appreciate the congratulations.

    • ValKaras 6 months ago

      Linda - What a great hub about these strange marine creatures! About their plural - I thought it was a Latin name, since "octo" in Latin means eight, and in that case "octopi" would be the proper plural. However, (as always) modified to fit English the way it gets pronounced, because not much respect is given to the original way it sounds in Latin - which would sound like "octopee", not "octopye". Similar like in math, 3.14 is originally pronounced as "pee", not "pye". Just a little about this stuff.

      However, no matter what they are called, again, these creatures are fascinating, like many other in the ocean, and you have done a great work in this hub. I certainly admire your knowledge about so many different species.

    • AliciaC profile image
      Author

      Linda Crampton 6 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      Hi, ValKaras. Thank you very much for the interesting comment. I appreciate your visit and your kindness!

    Click to Rate This Article