Rose-Breasted Grosbeak Facts, Pictures, and Migration

Updated on April 18, 2019
EricDockett profile image

Eric is an amateur birder and photographer who is amazed by the natural world just about every day.

The Rose-breasted Grosbeak is a beautiful backyard visitor during the summer months.
The Rose-breasted Grosbeak is a beautiful backyard visitor during the summer months.

The Rose-Breasted Grosbeak

The migration of the Rose-breasted Grosbeak may go unnoticed by some northerners. Many of us in the cooler climes of North America celebrate the arrival of the first American Robin each spring. But there is another visitor who comes on the heels of the Robin, one you might miss if you aren’t paying attention.

The Rose-breasted Grosbeak is a true harbinger of spring, a traveler from a tropical land, and when it returns from its winter grounds we can be assured the warm weather is right behind it. Some people may not know the name of this black-and-white bird with the red patch on its chest, but it is one of the prettiest and best-traveled songbirds in North America.

This bird spends the snowy season in Mexico and Central America, and some even find their way to the Caribbean, but in the springtime they return to their temperate breeding grounds.

In the summer they spend much of their time looking for insects, but if you keep an eye out you will see them at your bird feeder as well. In fact, if you take take some simple steps to make your backyard more bird-friendly you should see the them coming around quite often.

In this article you'll find some interesting facts about the Rose-breasted Grosbeak, as well as pictures to help to identify males and females, information on the Rose-breasted Grosbeak migration, and tips for attracting them to your backyard.

Rose-breasted Grosbeak Male in Summer Plumage
Rose-breasted Grosbeak Male in Summer Plumage

Male and Female Identification

The male and female of the species look like two very different type birds. Both are about eight inches tall, and both with heavy bills, but there the similarities begin to wither.

The male dons a vibrant black-and-white plumage with a bright red spot on his chest, while the female is more subdued shades of brown and white. Non-breeding males, too, are brown and white, with just a hint of the rose coloring on their chest.

During the overwinter period both sexes appear as drab versions of their summer selves.

Rose-beasted Grosbeak Female in Spring
Rose-beasted Grosbeak Female in Spring

Attracting the Rose-Breasted Grosbeak to Your Yard

As an insect-eater this bird most often finds its dinner while hunting in the branches of trees. It loves big-bodied insects like beetles, caterpillars, gypsy moths and grubs, but its heavy beak is made for munching up foods much tougher than the average bug. It will consume a wide variety of seeds found throughout its natural range, and will be happy to check out what you’re offering in your feeder.

The Rose-breasted Grosbeak will be a shy but reliable visitor to you bird feeder in the summer months. Serve high-quality black-oil sunflower seeds in a good mix and you’ll see these guys coming around in no time. This is a bird that falls somewhere between the small and medium-size range, so platform and hopper feeders are optimal and will allow it easy access to the seed.

However, it can manage with tube feeders intended for smaller perching birds when necessary, and (at least in my backyard) has shown a fair aptitude for problem solving when it can’t quite get to the seed it wants.

Since it is such a timid species, consider posting several feeders in order to alleviate congestion and encourage it to come in for seed. Once it discovers a reliable seed source it will be back repeatedly.

Like many songbird species, the Rose-breasted Grosbeak will happily make use of water features such as a birdbath.

Take care to note the female when she visits, as her coloring may cause you to misidentify her at first.

Rose-breasted Grosbeak Female at Feeder
Rose-breasted Grosbeak Female at Feeder

Classification

The Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianusis) is a member of the Cardinal family (Cardinalidae) and subdivided to the genus Pheucticus. Like the Northern Cardinal, it is a passerine, or perching bird, what we more often think of as a songbird. Despite the relative rarity of sightings as compared to its Cardinal cousin, it is not a threatened species and is fairly abundant throughout its range.

This “grosbeak” designation can be a bit befuddling. Some misidentify this bird as a member of the finch family (Fringillidae). Indeed, they do look somewhat like large finches, particularly the females and non-breeding males. But this designation is not technically correct. There are a few species referred to as “grosbeak” within the finch family, but the Rose-breasted Grosbeak and its direct relatives are not among them.

There are several different grosbeaks of the Cardinal family throughout North America, and each occupies its own niche in a different geographical areas.

The Male Rose-breasted Grosbeak at a Bird Feeder

Other Grosbeaks and Related Species

As mentioned above, the Rose-breasted Grosbeak is not closely related to finches, but is in fact a member of the Cardinal family. This makes it kin to the widely known Northern Cardinal as well as more obscure species such as the Pyrrhuloxia (Desert Cardinal) of Mexico and Southern Texas, the Dickcissel of the central United States, and the various Bunting species found in North America.

Other relatives include:

  • Black-headed Grosbeak: A bird that is common to the western parts of the United States during breeding months, and overwinters in Mexico. Because of overlapping territories in some areas of the Great Plains, interbreeding sometimes occurs between Rose-breasted and Black-headed Grosbeaks.
  • Blue Grosbeak: A beautiful deep-blue colored bird, distinguished from the related Indigo Bunting by its heavy bill. This bird is common to the south-central and southeastern parts of the United States, and shares an overwinter area with the Rose-breasted Grosbeak in Mexico and Central America.

Male Rose-breasted Grosbeak in Apple Tree
Male Rose-breasted Grosbeak in Apple Tree

Habitat and Nesting

Deciduous forests and mixed woodlands are preferred habitat during the summer months, but the Rose-breasted Grosbeak also does well in rural areas with sporadic human habitation. Backyard feeders are helpful, but due to its diverse diet this bird can do just fine regardless of human influence.

As a migratory bird, the extra calories from bird feeders can help to build energy reserves for the long flight south as well as provide easy sources of sustenance along the way.

In its summer habitat it will build a nest off the ground made primarily of twigs. Woodlands with a stream or field nearby are common nesting sites, with a fair buffer between the nest and human habitation. Swampy areas are often preferred above dry forests. The nest may be several feet off the ground, or as high a fifty feet.

Breeding males first establish a territory, often returning to the same area each year. They then attract a female with their bright red breasts and striking black-and-white contrast, and the pair remains together for the duration of the season. The male will help with the construction of the nest and even do his part for the incubation of the eggs, giving the female a reprieve from time to time.

A clutch of three to five eggs will hatch out in about 13 days, and within two weeks the chicks will leave the nest. Like most birds, they’ll follow their parents around for a little while until they get the hang of things.

Rose-breasted Grosbeak Male at Bird Bath
Rose-breasted Grosbeak Male at Bird Bath

Migration and Overwintering

In the summer (breeding) months the Rose-breasted Grosbeak will spend its time in the North American forests and scrublands, with a range throughout much of the Northeastern part of the continent.The males will arrive in mid-spring and are soon followed by the females a few weeks later.

This is the time for those of us in the North to spot this busy traveler while we can. It only stays in its northern range for short periods of time, perhaps only three months in some areas, possibly as long as five in its southern breeding range.

By September it is time to fly south for the winter again, on a return trip that allows it to avoid the cold weather. It’s a pretty smart bird, when you think about it!

For the overwinter period the Rose-breasted Grosbeak will settle into the tropical regions of southern Mexico, the Caribbean, South and Central America. During the winter it prefers forests and may flock in loose groups. They will consume fruits and nectars as a larger percentage of their food sources, in addition to the usual seeds and insects. While somewhat territorial in their breeding territory, they are much more tolerant of each other in their winter grounds.

Rose-breasted Grosbeak Migration Patterns
Rose-breasted Grosbeak Migration Patterns | Source

The Long Flight South

The Rose-breasted Grosbeak is an interesting and enigmatic voyager, a visitor from another world here in our part of the country for a short time each year before it moves along and forgets all about us. Like the migration of the Robins, when the day comes that you realize these birds are no longer coming around you know that winter is on the way. Unlike us, they have the common sense to leave with the summer, and follow the warm weather south.

So, as the snow starts to fall, and the temperatures plummet, imagine the Rose-breasted Grosbeaks you observed over the past summer. While you shiver, they bask in the sun. While you shovel, they enjoy tropical fruits and nectar. While you curse the snow, the sleet and the freezing rain, they are bathed by warm showers and ocean breezes.

On second thought, maybe it’s better not to think about it. It’s far too depressing to be jealous of a bird!

Rose-breasted Grosbeaks in Your Backyard

Does the Rose-breasted Grosbeak come to your yard?

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    • profile image

      Debbie 

      6 weeks ago

      We have just had a juvenile grosbeak on our feeder for the last two days. It looks like the female spring grosbeak. It loves the sunflower hearts. There is only the one. Are there more and we just

    • profile image

      Linda 

      2 months ago

      We live in the Southern Tier of NewYork state. Lots of male and female grosbeaks visit our feeders on the deck. You can walk out on the deck and they are not bothered by our presence.

    • EricDockett profile imageAUTHOR

      Eric Dockett 

      3 months ago from USA

      Hi Margo! Thanks so much for the kind words! Regarding your upside-down visitor, the White-Breasted Nuthatch comes to mind. I believe they are common in your area.

    • profile image

      Margo 

      3 months ago

      Hi Eric. I certainly enjoy reading your articles every day. Thank you. I'm in the Lakes Region of NH and we have seen the males at the feeders ever day since mid-May. We may have females too but i didnt know they looked so different and may have mistaken them for another bird. The Orioles left for a while but we had a beautiful male at the suet feeder this morning. Too many Blue Jays to count!

      We have one bird that comes to the feeder I call the "upside down" bird. It actually eats upside down. I just love watching them all!

    • profile image

      Rhonda Cummins 

      3 months ago

      I had a pair show up at my feeders on May 9th. They have been here every day . On June 15th both the male and female were at the feeder very often al day and I haven't seen them since! I could just cry! I'm hoping they will bring their babies to my feeder! May 15th was the last day I saw the baltimore orioles also! I'm just so sad here in central Iowa!

    • profile image

      Barbara Barto 

      4 months ago

      We have had Rose-breasted Gross beaks at our feeders for the past 15 years - Thomaston CT - they arrive around May 2 - this year they arrived about 10 days late - they were at our feeders for about a week - we haven’t seen them since - we are heartbroken -

      What happened to them?

    • Joanne Lythgoe profile image

      Joanne Lythgoe 

      4 months ago

      Just saw a male rose breasted grosbeak on my feeder in Park City Utah! 7,000 ft elevation. Beautiful bird!!

      Today is June 8th.

    • profile image

      Kit Hunter 

      4 months ago

      Had a male on my feeder in Ogden, Utah. Have never seen one in Utah. He was here on may 27, have not seen since

    • profile image

      Donna Salis/Christensen 

      4 months ago

      Saw one over a week ago when the Orioles first appeared. Usually, have plenty by now, but cooler & wetter than normal weather this Spring may be influencing their arrival.

    • profile image

      Colene 

      4 months ago

      Just saw are first Rose Breasted Grosbeak this morning in central Michigan. Sharing the grape jelly with the Baltimore Orioles. Fun to watch them all!!

    • EricDockett profile imageAUTHOR

      Eric Dockett 

      4 months ago from USA

      Hi Lynn - My guess is if they are there now you've probably got them for the summer.

    • profile image

      Lynn 

      4 months ago

      Grosbeaks have been appearing at my feeder here in Milwuakee, 2nd week in May. Can anyone tell me if they will stay all summer? I hope so, they are gorgeous!

    • profile image

      Tammy 

      5 months ago

      Here in Fulda, Indiana, visiting males & female grosbeaks moved through couple weeks ago. Now a lonely immature male showed up gobbling up the sunflower seeds. He is taking advantage of suet also.

    • profile image

      Paula 

      5 months ago

      In the Brainerd lakes area in north central Minnesota. Saw them on my feeder for the first time this week. At least one male and ine female that I can tell. Beautiful! They add to the beauty of the Baltimore Orioles on the other feeder

    • profile image

      Michelle 

      5 months ago

      I live in the Nashville TN area and have a male visiting my feeders. I have never seen one here. I am keeping an eye out for the female.

    • profile image

      Alice in Oxford Ct 

      5 months ago

      So glad to see Grosbeak both male and female are coming back at feeders on the first week of May. They always stayed longer than other birds, must be very hungry. The male bird also loves corn on the cob I left outside they don‘t mind chilly raining day at 40s in Ct. My zoom lense camera aiming them quickly they seem don‘t care that much.

    • profile image

      Brian Kinstler 

      5 months ago

      I have three males and at least one female in my tiny Milwaukee backyard, and I’ve only ever seen one before in my life — seems they are appearing all over the area suddenly and in unusually large numbers this year. Maybe the recent Artic vortex threw off migration patterns? Glad to have them, though!

    • profile image

      GB 

      5 months ago

      They always return to my 23 heavily wooded acres in Eaton County. Thanks for the info about migration ranges. They're very bold, even more than Chickadees. I can get within a foot of them while they're feeding on small black oil sunflower seeds. They have a beautiful song.

    • profile image

      Don and Michelle H. 

      5 months ago

      We live In Troy, Ohio and spotted our first male black-headed grosbeak yesterday at the feeder out our house and he is back today. Now that we know what the female looks I am sure we saw one last summer at the feeder. My husband sees male grosbeaks at the golf course all the time. Beautiful birds. So exciting!

    • profile image

      Tara 

      5 months ago

      I have 4 males at my safflower feeder for the last 3 days. I am north of Toronto , Ontario . It is my first time seeing these beautiful birds at this house

    • profile image

      Kara 

      5 months ago

      I live just north of Toronto, Ontario, and, much to my delight, I saw my first male and female grosbeaks here yesterday with a return visit this morning. Beautiful!

    • profile image

      Rob and Anne 

      5 months ago

      Two gorgeous males with two females arrived at our East Lansing, Michigan feeder today. Typically stay around for three or four days, early May. Seem very happy with oily, black sunflower seed.

    • profile image

      Kate Barbati 

      5 months ago

      I grew up in Boston, NY (30 years ago) and they were always around. I now live in Blasdell, NY (for the past 5 years) and had my very first one visit today!! I was so happy - they are my favorite bird!

    • profile image

      Annie 

      5 months ago

      Live in the south side of Milwaukee. These last two days have seen as many as 5 males at one time at my feeder. They are just beautiful. Hope they stay.

    • profile image

      Bernadette Martin 

      5 months ago

      Have two males at my feeder this week. Have never seen them before. I live in the Niagara Peninsula.

    • profile image

      Amy 

      5 months ago

      Male and female in Niagara Falls Canada all day today. The female has been eating the oranges put out for the orioles

    • profile image

      Michael Anderson 

      5 months ago

      I live in Vernon Parrish Louisiana and have a pair of these at our feeder every year for the past five years during the month of May. For several weeks during May we will see them each day at our feeders then they disappear we assume to head north.

    • profile image

      Kathy Mac 

      5 months ago

      Arrived here in Northern Il a few days. Had three males and at least a couple females feeding in my yard all at once. They seem to love the grape jelly and suet. They will hop right on my teacup and eat the grape jelly. When they are busy eating, they don't mind me photographing. Beautiful songs!

    • profile image

      Lt 

      5 months ago

      Have 2 males, with red chests, and 1 female, live just outside lake placid, new york

    • profile image

      Sally 

      5 months ago

      My rose breasted grosbeak showed up as always this week - early May, near Richmond, VA. 2019. He spent the day and left. Hope his cousins will come by throughout the summer! I love this bird!!

    • profile image

      Babbitt 

      5 months ago

      I live in Indiana I have a lot of rose breast grosbeaks i n my yard a

    • profile image

      Steve 

      5 months ago

      Ihavealotof rosebreated grosbeaks in my yard as of5 -7-19

    • profile image

      Glenda McGee 

      5 months ago

      I had a male eating sunflower seeds at my feeder. It was eating unlike any bird I had ever seen, as though it was starving. It let me approach and never stopped eating until I was about 5 feet away.

      It was very very very hungry.

      The grosbeaks showed up in my Catskills neighborhood this weekend.

      All my neighbors with feeders mentioned them.

      I wonder if they migrate in a wee flock.

    • EricDockett profile imageAUTHOR

      Eric Dockett 

      5 months ago from USA

      Thanks for all of the great comments on Rose-Breasted Grosbeak sightings in your areas. I always love seeing the reports roll in from south to north every spring. So much appreciated!

      I finally spotted two males at my feeder here in PA over the weekend. In a related story, I also have an Eastern Towhee hanging around, a bird I have not seen in several years.

    • profile image

      Kristen Esbensen 

      5 months ago

      Saw a female this evening at my backyard feeders. 5/3/2019.

    • profile image

      Becky 

      5 months ago

      Noticed them today in northern Illinois. They have dominated the bird feeder! Beautiful birds, was surprised at how different the female looks compared to the male.

    • profile image

      Butchie Barnes 

      5 months ago

      Two males seen in central Mississippi yesterday and today!

    • profile image

      BJ Brignoli 

      5 months ago

      We had 2 males & 1 female.

      Arrived early at feeders this year.

      They fueled up a few days and gone this morning.

      What a joy. Wish they’d stay longer.

      (Had a pair that stopped by on their return last fall.) Fingers crossed!

      May 5, 2019

      Canandaigua Lake, NY.

      (Finger Lakes Region)

    • profile image

      Joyce 

      5 months ago

      First male grosbeak at my feeder in Harrisonburg,Virginia. Sure hope I get more. Beautiful bird.

    • profile image

      C A White 

      5 months ago

      At the feeder today.....4 May.....Stafford, NY

    • profile image

      Cole 

      5 months ago

      Two males stopped by for lunch in Amawalk,N.Y.

    • profile image

      Carol Bull 

      5 months ago

      Six males and two females at our feeders last couple days. Would love for them to stay here for a long period. Love watching them in Woodland, Illinois.

    • profile image

      John 

      5 months ago

      Sighting of

      Grosbeak at bird feeder in St. Catharines Ont. May 3/19. Vivid colours!

    • profile image

      Linda Winkler 

      5 months ago

      The Rose-Breasted Grosbeaks arrived Yesterday have 5 pairs hope they will stay around. Minooka illinois

    • profile image

      Natela 

      5 months ago

      These beauties appeared in Pennsylvania in Pocono in my feeders today May 3, 2019. charming little birds !!!!

    • profile image

      Madsci51 

      5 months ago

      The Rose Breasted Grosbeaks have arrived, Today is May 2, 2019 at 130PM. Centerville Ohio south of Dayton Ohio, Normal arrival time for 3 to 7 days. Hope it will be the longer time.

    • profile image

      LTD626 

      5 months ago

      My Grosbeak showed up today May 2 in the middle of the thumb of Michigan.

    • profile image

      John 

      5 months ago

      Woke up this morning to 3 males on my feeder. We usually have 2 pair around all summer

    • profile image

      DEW 

      5 months ago

      Saw my first one last night. So pretty! Then again this morning, I saw a total of 3!! I hope they stay just a little longer! Hershey, PA

    • profile image

      Nancy 

      5 months ago

      Sighted first one 4/23, a week earlier than usual in Niles, Michigan. This morning there are six males at our feeder!

    • profile image

      Karen 

      5 months ago

      I saw a male in my yard in the Richmond area for the first time about 2 weeks ago. A couple days ago he came to my feeder, and was back twice today. Is he feeding to gain strength to go further north?

    • profile image

      Pam Phillips 

      5 months ago

      A beautiful male at my feeder here in Nashville! Thrilled to have him! Watched him skirmish with a red-bellied woodpecker and a cardinal, jockeying for position on the platform feeder: I think I may have spotted a female a few days ago, but wasn’t able to identify at the time. They still have a long way to travel so I hope they stick around a few days to fuel up.

    • profile image

      Janice 

      5 months ago

      We live in Memphis, Tenn. (western edge of the state) and this is the second spring we have seen these beautiful birds at our feeders. Arrived on 4/27 this year and have seen only males -- up to six of them around the feeders at one time -- until this morning (4/30) when the first female appeared. We are not close to either migratory route shown on the map.

    • profile image

      Sandy 

      5 months ago

      Matthews, NC. They visit our feeders around Mother’s Day. This year 2019, they are 2 weeks early. Have seen 2 males and one female. I look forward to their brief stop over every year.

    • profile image

      Ted Lee 

      5 months ago

      Just a male on my hanging feeder in Emporia,VA. Beautiful bird!

    • profile image

      linda 

      5 months ago

      i live in louisiana the rose breast grouspeck was in my front yard this year i seen them for 2 are 3 days after they were here i dont see them any more

    • profile image

      Jean 

      5 months ago

      I live in Winchester Va and this is the first time I have seen a male munching seeds at the feeder. Beautiful bird.

    • profile image

      Sandi 

      5 months ago

      A pair have been coming to my feeder for the past few days here in Natchitoches, Louisiana - first time I have seen them here

    • profile image

      Anne 

      5 months ago

      So happy to report, I have identified a female rose breasted grosbeak at my safflower feeder. Tampa, FL. On April 26, 2019.

    • profile image

      Nancy 

      5 months ago

      Daily we have had 3 males and 2 females frequenting our bird feeders with sunflower seeds. I live in Seminole, FL.

    • profile image

      NiStone 

      5 months ago

      We live in Jacksonville, FL and had our first male grosbeak this week, April 22. It was beautiful! It ate from the bird feeder and the ground. It also used our birdbath!

    • profile image

      Tony Ross 

      5 months ago

      We live in Marietta, Ga. and have a pair that visit our feeder

      every year. Been about 4 days so far, we look forward to seeing

      them every spring.

      I keep songbird seed, peanut and fruit mix out during the spring.

      Local birds seem to love suit for feeding hatchlings

    • profile image

      George 

      5 months ago

      A male grosbeak Has been eating all day at my bird feeder in Sarasota, FLorida. Mix of seeds.

    • profile image

      Angela Erin 

      5 months ago

      I live in Sandy Springs Georgia and just saw a male rose breasted grosbeak at my feeders. I always wonder if it’s the same one that comes through every year. He is usually at my feeders just a few days and then he’s gone til the fall when I will see him again for a couple of days. It’s like saying hello to an old friend.

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      Brownie Ramsey 

      6 months ago

      We live in Jacksonville, Florida and for the past 2 days we have seen a Grosbeak at one of our sunflower seed feeders !!!!!!!! Was sure it was some kind of woodpecker until I googled it !!!!!!!!!!! So surprised !!!!!!!!!!! Hope he continues to come !!!!!!!!!!

    • profile image

      Edward Letkiewicz 

      6 months ago

      The first 1-2 weeks of May every year. I have a big platform feeder and I really enjoy when they spend a little time with me. Such beautiful birds.

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      Chris 

      12 months ago

      I live the west coast central Florida and just spotted a non breeding male at my bird feeder. Very rare to see one here, must be migrating south,passing through. What a delight. I used to see then in New Hampshire every summer!

    • profile image

      Renee Anderson 

      14 months ago

      We have so many coming to the feeders this year, we have had them around for quite a few years but not in the numbers we have seen this year. They started bringing the young around June 23 and they were still coming with fledglings as of yesterday. It is very quite here this afternoon though and I am wondering if they have left Love having them around and so happy their numbers are increasing.

    • profile image

      Carole Roseman 

      15 months ago

      We've had them returning for many many years to our home - with multiple feeders - in NY State near MA border.

      Love those birds !!

    • profile image

      donald hass 

      15 months ago

      They come to my feeder, I only have sunflower seeds in it.

    • EricDockett profile imageAUTHOR

      Eric Dockett 

      17 months ago from USA

      Thanks for the kind words, Dolores! They are beautiful birds, and certainly worth taking some time out of a busy day just to observe.

    • Dolores Monet profile image

      Dolores Monet 

      17 months ago from East Coast, United States

      I enjoyed your article and loved the pictures. I've only see a Rose breasted Grosbeak once and it was in my yard in Baltimore, Md. This was several springs ago and I had so much to do. But I gave up getting anything done. Seeing such a striking bird in my own back yard I had to spend several hours just watching him.

    • profile image

      Wioletta 

      17 months ago

      Just saw my first Grosbeaks today in Middlebury CT is beautiful I hope it will return to my feeder.

    • moonlake profile image

      moonlake 

      17 months ago from America

      Yesterday I put a photo on Facebook of rose breasted grosbeak on my feeder.

      I don’t see them as often here as I did when I lived further north. Beautiful birds. Enjoyed your hub.

    • EricDockett profile imageAUTHOR

      Eric Dockett 

      17 months ago from USA

      @Becky - I would assume so, but people in the southern US may be better able to answer that. I don't typically see the large migrating flocks others are reporting.

    • profile image

      Misty Sinistore 

      17 months ago

      Saw my first Grosbeak last year only saw it once. It has been at my feed for about a week this year and I am so excited. The research I've done states it's shy but this little guy is far from shy. I hope he sticks around and I get to spot his girlfriend. We are in Columbia County NY

    • profile image

      Mtlcda 

      17 months ago

      I moved back to Canada recently and getting my bird feeders out was a priority. I was thrilled to see a male grosbeak at the feeders this morning. Crossing my fingers I see more. I live on the St. Lawrence directly south of Ottawa.

    • profile image

      Dave. - Brookville Ohio 

      17 months ago

      Had my first male grosebeak at my feeder this morning and a female this afternoon. First female I have seen. Last year had two males that I had noticed. Beautiful birds!!

    • profile image

      Dave 

      17 months ago

      Had a male at our feeder this evening. Beautiful Hope he stays around.

    • profile image

      Becky 

      17 months ago

      Are the Grosbeaks observed returning to South America in the same areas where they appeared in spring?

    • profile image

      David Matthews 

      17 months ago

      I am just west of Nashville, Tennessee and the male and female grosbeaks are having a ball at my sunflower seeds feeders. I must have 10-15 or so. I don’t show as a breeding ground on the map in this article. I do hope they stay. We’ve had them for a couple of weeks so far and all day long.

    • profile image

      Jim 

      17 months ago

      Saw my first rose breasted today in Riva, Md. Near Annapolis.

      Beautiful. Perhaps he'll be back tomorrow.

    • profile image

      Bskurn 

      17 months ago

      Just saw 2 males!! Usually see 1 female and 1 male here in N IN. Do the babies follow parents back to nesting grounds?

    • profile image

      JimCharly Bennett 

      17 months ago

      Beautiful birds, Had 2 males and 1 female at feeders over a period of 5 days in 2017. In 2018, May 1st, a male showed up. On the 2nd we had 2 males, today, the 3rd, we had 2 males, a female and 1 non-breeding male.

      Beautiful creatures. (Lexington, KY)

    • profile image

      Bob 

      17 months ago

      We saw our first 2 males and one female this morning on our feeders. They come thru Evansville, IN every spring and fall. They are absolutely beautiful!

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      Pam 

      17 months ago

      Brevard nc have had them at the feeder 5 pairs for the first time ever thrilling

      Used to see them in Northern NJ

    • EricDockett profile imageAUTHOR

      Eric Dockett 

      17 months ago from USA

      Thank you everyone for reporting your sightings! I never expected that when I published this article. Sadly, I've yet to see my first Rose-breasted Grosbeak of the season, but I'm ready with camera when they start coming around.

    • profile image

      Pamela Brockman 

      17 months ago

      I've had two males and a female coming the male is smaller ,I read it takes 13days to hatch ,and in two weeks they leave the nest , follow the parents untill they get the hang of things then leave , maybe it was a baby because I haven't seen it for a few days ! I'm in Arkansas

    • profile image

      thomas ray 

      17 months ago

      saw two male and one female rose breasted grosbeak at my feeder yesterday morning and two males today. I live in western kentucky. also saw two male baltomore orioles at my grape jelly feeder they are beautiful.

    • profile image

      Judy Biser 

      17 months ago

      Just saw a male rose-breasted grossest at our feeder in Westernport, MD. He is a beautiful bird! We were thrilled to have him visit!

    • profile image

      Joy Adams 

      17 months ago

      Have had the male come to my feeder for two days now! Live in the Chattanooga TN area! So excited to see this beauty!

    • profile image

      thomas ray 

      17 months ago

      I saw my first rose-breasted grosbeak of the year at my feeder yesterday. he was beautiful. I know he was only passing through . maybe I will see him when he comes back this fall. Im in mortons gap ky.

    • profile image

      Dorothy, Mobile AL 

      17 months ago

      4.29.18 saw a male yesterday, first time in about 5 years! Happy to just get to have a glimpse of this beautiful bird

    • profile image

      amanda lebanon, mo 

      17 months ago

      Saw three at my feeder this morning. I did not recognize them so I looked them up and found that they were red-breasted grosbeaks.

    • profile image

      Maureen, Central NJ 

      17 months ago

      I saw one in my backyard near my feeder. Wasn't sure what it was so I looked it up and found it was a red-breasted grosbeak!! A beautiful bird!! I hope I see it again soon!

    • profile image

      Alice F, Karnack, Tx 

      17 months ago

      Saw my very first this morning at the feeder. Absolutely beautiful.

    • profile image

      Robin W.Armstrong 

      17 months ago

      I had a male Rose breasted Grosbeak at my feeders on 4/25/18,the first and only one I have ever seen....what a treat !!

      He stayed for about 10 min.

      I'm in Pace, Fl.

    • profile image

      Rosemary Gray, Rock Hill SC 

      17 months ago

      Saw my first red-breasted grosbeak ever on the feeder today. Absolutely strikingly beautiful!

    • profile image

      Howard , Raeford NC 

      17 months ago

      Had three males visiting feeder yesterday evening,enjoying black sunflower seeds.

      First sighting of species for me. Looked up picture to identify, very handsome with bright plumage. Robins have been migrating for several weeks. 4/24/18

    • profile image

      Janice Rogers, Stem NC 

      18 months ago

      I just saw my first two yesterday morning (Sunday, April 22, 2018). They only stayed for a short while at the bird feeders and then took off. I wish they would come back.

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