The Top 10 Deadliest Spiders in the World

Updated on April 21, 2020
Larry Slawson profile image

Larry Slawson received his Master's Degree from UNC Charlotte. He has a keen interest in reptiles, insects, and arachnids.

The top 10 deadliest spiders in the world.
The top 10 deadliest spiders in the world.

The 10 Deadliest Spiders in the World

  • Brown Widow Spider
  • Yellow Sac Spider
  • Indian Ornamental Tarantula
  • Brown Recluse
  • Black Widow Spider
  • Sydney Funnel-Web Spider
  • Chinese Bird Spider
  • Redback Spider
  • Brazilian Wandering Spider
  • Six-Eyed Sand Spider

Introduction

Throughout the world, there exists a handful of spiders capable of causing serious injury (including death) to humans. Although the majority of spiders are relatively harmless to the human population at large, a small number of species are considered extremely harmful to human beings due to their potent venom and aggressive nature.

This article examines the 10 deadliest and most dangerous spiders known to currently exist worldwide. The research presented below analyzes overall venom toxicity as well as each spider’s potential for causing human fatalities in the absence of medical care or the administration of appropriate antivenom.

Selection Criteria

In order to select the spiders listed below, the author makes a number of assumptions. Since it is true that most spider bites can be effectively countered by the administration of antivenom, a presumptive mindset is necessary for the extent and purpose of this overall study. As a result, each of the spiders listed will be analyzed in accordance with their potential for causing long-term harm (or death) in the absence of antivenom or medical care. This is a necessary component to the study, as spider bite deaths have largely been on the decline (worldwide) since the Nineteenth Century.

In addition to these basic assumptions, the average (expected) time of death following a bite (without treatment) and venom toxicity is also considered for this study. While imperfect, these criteria offer a realistic measurement for determining the deadliest and most dangerous spiders of the world.

"Birds I am fine with - spiders are an entirely different matter."

— Tippi Hedren
The infamous Brown Widow Spider.
The infamous Brown Widow Spider. | Source

10. Brown Widow Spider

  • Common Name: Brown Widow Spider
  • Binomial Name: Latrodectus geometricus
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Subphylum: Chelicerata
  • Class: Arachnida
  • Order: Araneae
  • Infraorder: Araneomorphae
  • Family: Theridiidae
  • Genus: Latrodectus
  • Species: L. geometricus
  • Synonyms: Theridium zickzack (Karsch, 1878); Latrodectus concinnus (O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1904); Chacoca distincta (Badcock, 1932)

Characteristics

The Brown Widow is a species of spider from the Theridiidae family that includes the infamous Black Widow. Also known as the "Brown Button Spider," the "Grey Widow," or the "Geometric Button Spider," the Brown Widow is easily identifiable due to its light brown coloration, and yellowish-orange hourglass along its abdomen. The Brown Widow is found throughout the world, including Africa, the United States, Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and South America. As a relatively large spider (approximately 1 to 1.25 inches in length), the Brown Widow is a formidable opponent for most insects, due to its size and toxic venom. The spider prefers warm and dry areas that include brush piles, wooded areas, crawl spaces, as well as porch railings, and flower pots.

Brown Widow Bite Symptoms and Treatment

The Brown Widow is highly venomous, and contains a neurotoxin known to attack the nerve endings of its victims. Common symptoms of a Brown Widow bite include, extreme pain, muscle spasms, vomiting, nausea, and extreme sweating. In cases of severe envenomation, muscle contractions (tetanus-like), spinal and cerebral paralysis, and death have also been recorded. Fortunately, due to the small size of their mouth, severe bites (and fatalities) are relatively rare for the Brown Widow as they are often incapable of delivering large doses of venom to humans. Despite the rarity of fatal occurrences, however, researchers warn that extreme care should always be taken with the Brown Widow, particularly with individuals that possess weakened immune systems as dangerous (and life threatening) bites do occur on occasion.

The Yellow Sac Spider.
The Yellow Sac Spider. | Source

9. Yellow Sac Spider

  • Common Name: Yellow Sac Spider
  • Binomial Name: Cheiracanthium
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Subphylum: Chelicerata
  • Class: Arachnida
  • Order: Araneae
  • Infraorder: Araneomorphae
  • Family: Eutichuridae
  • Genus: Cheiracanthium

Characteristics

The Yellow Sac Spider is a species endemic to the Americas, and is typically found living in forests, gardens, and occasionally human homes. At approximately 0.12 to 0.6 inches in length, the spider is relatively small. It is also primarily nocturnal, and actively hunts throughout the night rather than using webs to catch prey. As its name implies, the Yellow Sac Spider can be identified by its yellow-beige coloration, along with dark brown markings along its palps, jaws, and feet. It is also common for the spider to have an orangish-brown stripe along the center of its abdomen as well.

Yellow Sac Spider Bite Symptoms and Treatment

The Yellow Sac Spider is highly venomous, and is capable of biting humans with ease. In fact, some researchers believe that the spider accounts for more human bites than any other species of spider in the world. In contrast to the Brown Recluse’s relatively painless bite, a bite from the Yellow Sac Spider often begins with moderate to severe pain, followed by intense itching. This is due, in part, to the spider’s venom which contains cytotoxins. Reddening of the skin, rashes, burning, blistering, and small welts (with necrotic centers) are also common. More severe symptoms of a Yellow Sac Spider bite include nausea, fever, abdominal cramps, and general sickness.

Symptoms usually resolve within seven to ten days. Although bites from this spider rarely result in permanent damage or death to humans, the possibility of anaphylactic shock is always a major concern for Yellow Sac Spider bites, and should be treated with extreme care.

The massive Indian Ornamental Tarantula.
The massive Indian Ornamental Tarantula.

8. Indian Ornamental Tarantula

  • Common Name: Indian Ornamental Tarantula
  • Binomial Name: Poecilotheria regalis
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Subphylum: Chelicerata
  • Class: Arachnida
  • Order: Araneae
  • Infraorder: Mygalomorphae
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Genus: Poecilotheria
  • Species: P. regalis
  • Synonyms: Ornithoctonus gadgili (Tikader, 1977)

Characteristics

The Indian Ornamental Tarantula is a species of spider found in South Asia, as well as Southeastern India. In the wild, the spider lives primarily in holes or in trees, spinning large funnel webs to subdue flying insects. After catching an insect in their web, the Indian Ornamental quickly paralyzes its prey with powerful venom; incapacitating the insect and allowing the spider to eat when ready. As with most tarantula species, the Indian Ornamental is quite large, with a leg span of over seven inches (18 centimeters). The species can be easily identified due to its large size, as well as the bright yellow markings that dot its legs.

Indian Ornamental Tarantula Bite Symptoms and Treatment

As a highly venomous species, the Indian Ornamental Tarantula is capable of delivering severely painful bites. In addition to pain and severe swelling, the spider’s large fangs are capable of producing deep puncture wounds in their victims that often lead to secondary infections (bacterial). Despite causing no reported deaths, the threat of anaphylactic shock is a potential hazard of the Indian Ornamental which, in itself, is potentially fatal if not treated promptly.

As with any spider bite, experts agree that prompt medical attention should be sought out to treat symptoms and reduce the chance of long-term complications.

The highly-venomous Brown Recluse Spider.
The highly-venomous Brown Recluse Spider. | Source

7. Brown Recluse

  • Common Name: Brown Recluse
  • Binomial Name: Loxosceles reclusa
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Subphylum: Chelicerata
  • Class: Arachnida
  • Order: Araneae
  • Infraorder: Araneomorphae
  • Family: Sicariidae
  • Genus: Loxosceles
  • Species: L. reclusa
  • Synonyms: Loxosceles reclusus

Characteristics

The Brown Recluse is a species of spider from the Sicariidae family. Primarily found in North America (throughout the Midwest and Southern United States in particular), the Brown Recluse is easily recognizable due to its light (to medium) brown appearance, as well as its black lines that favor a violin in appearance. For this reason, the Brown Recluse is sometimes referred to as the “Fiddleback Spider,” the “Brown Fiddler,” or the “Violin Spider.”

Brown Recluses are relatively small (0.24 to 0.79 inches in length), and live predominantly in woodpiles, dark areas, and places that are generally dry (and away from humans). As a nocturnal species, the spider often does most of its hunting at night, preying on small insects as well as other spiders that it comes into contact with.

Brown Recluse Bite Symptoms and Treatment

The Brown Recluse possesses a deadly hemotoxic venom that can be extremely serious if medical treatment is not sought immediately. Although most Brown Recluse bites are small and produce no visible signs of envenomation, severe bites are capable of producing skin necrosis (with wounds as large as ten inches in diameter) as well as a range of other dangerous symptoms. These include extreme pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, muscle pain, and rashes. In more severe bites, symptoms include hemolysis (bursting of red blood cells), thrombocytopenia, organ damage (and failure), intravascular coagulation of the blood, as well as death.

Children – particularly those under seven years of age – are particularly susceptible to the Brown Recluse’s bite, and make up the majority of fatalities (along with the elderly and those with weakened immune systems). Symptoms of a Brown Recluse bite often develop within 2 to 8 hours, with necrosis beginning several days later. Fortunately, serious bites are relatively rare as the Brown Recluse is not known to be aggressive.

The deadly Black Widow Spider.
The deadly Black Widow Spider. | Source

6. Black Widow Spider

  • Common Name: Black Widow
  • Binomial Name: Latrodectus
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Subphylum: Chelicerata
  • Class: Arachnida
  • Order: Araneae
  • Infraorder: Araneomorphae
  • Family: Theridiidae
  • Genus: Latrodectus

Characteristics

The Black Widow is a highly venomous species of spider from the Theridiidae family, which includes 31 different species of black and brown widows. The spider is easily identifiable due to its dark color and red markings along its abdomen that are often in the shape of an hourglass. The Black Widow gets its name from the fact that females often kill their male counterparts after mating; using their former mates as a source of “easy” food to provide adequate nutrition for the birthing process. Black Widows are found on every continent of the world (with the exception of Antarctica), and prefer dark areas such as woodpiles, basement areas, holes, and crawl spaces indoors.

Black Widow Bite Symptoms and Treatment

Despite the spider’s relatively small size, its venom is extremely potent and contains the neurotoxin known as “latrotoxin.” It is believed that the spider’s venom is fifteen times more potent than a rattlesnake. However, due to their small size, only tiny amounts of venom are injected into their victims (making the bites more unpleasant rather than deadly). After biting their victims, the toxin begins to take effect relatively quickly, causing severe muscle pains, muscle spasms, abdominal cramping, hyperhidrosis, elevated heart rates (tachycardia), as well as dizziness. Symptoms typically last for 3 to 7 days, but can persist for several weeks depending on the severity of the bite.

In the United States alone, nearly 2,200 people are bitten by black widows each year, with only a few requiring medical treatment or hospitalization. Although antivenoms exist to counteract the spider’s venom, they are typically used as a means to relieve pain rather than save lives (due to the rare instances of death associated with the spider’s bite). In fact, no fatalities have been reported in the United States from black widow bites since 1983. This is due, in part, because of the rarity of black widow bites.

As a non-aggressive spider, black widows usually only bite when startled or when they are in imminent danger. Additionally, most bites that occur are usually “dry bites,” meaning that no venom was injected into the injured party.

Quick Fact #1

Black Widow Spiders spin some of the strongest known silk in the world. Their silk is often compared to that of Kevlar, and has been found to be stronger than steel (pound-for-pound).

The dangerous Sydney Funnel-Web Spider.
The dangerous Sydney Funnel-Web Spider. | Source

5. Sydney Funnel-Web Spider

  • Common Name: Sydney Funnel-Web Spider
  • Binomial Name: Atrax robustus
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Subphylum: Chelicerata
  • Class: Arachnida
  • Order: Araneae
  • Infraorder: Mygalomorphae
  • Family: Atracidae
  • Genus: Atrax
  • Species: A. robustus
  • Synonyms: Euctimena tibialis (Rainbow, 1914); Poikilomorpha montana (Rainbow, 1914)

Characteristics

The Sydney Funnel-Web Spider is a highly venomous species of spider from the “mygalomorph” order that is native to Eastern Australia. True to its name, the spider is predominantly found within a 100-mile radius of Australia’s capital city, Sydney. With a body length of 0.4 to 2 inches, the spider is relatively large, with a glossy, dark coloration that ranges from blue to black. Found mostly under logs and local plant life, the spider is mostly terrestrial, and favors moist sand areas.

Sydney Funnel-Web Spider Bite Symptoms and Treatment

Sydney Funnel-Web Spiders contain highly potent doses of venom that are extremely dangerous to humans if left untreated. The spider’s venom contains a powerful compound known as “Delta Atracotoxin.” Known to latch on to their victims (biting multiple times), full envenomation is common with the Sydney Funnel-Web Spider, with symptoms beginning less than an hour after the bite. The bite is extremely painful due to the large fangs of the spider. Common symptoms include muscular spasms and pain, difficulty breathing, confusion, disorientation, dizziness, excessive saliva secretion, and loss of consciousness.

Bites are considered medical emergencies, and require immediate hospitalization. Although antivenoms exist to counteract the Funnel-Web Spider’s bite, rapid treatment is required for best results. Due to the existence of the antivenom, however, no fatalities have been reported since 1981.

Quick Fact #2

When attacking their prey, the Sydney Funnel-Web Spider is known to inflict multiple bites, causing severe pain due to its powerful venom and large fangs.

The massive Chinese Bird Spider.
The massive Chinese Bird Spider. | Source

4. Chinese Bird Spider

  • Common Name: Chinese Bird Spider
  • Binomial Name: Cyriopagopus hainanus
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Subphylum: Chelicerata
  • Class: Arachnida
  • Order: Araneae
  • Infraorder: Mygalomorphae
  • Family: Theraphosidae
  • Genus: Cyriopagopus
  • Species: C. hainanus
  • Synonyms: Selenocosmia hainana (Liang, 1999); Ornithoctonus hainana (Liang, 1999); Haplopelma hainanum (Liang, 1999)

Characteristics

The Chinese Bird Spider is a species of spider from the Theraphosidae family (tarantulas), and is found predominantly in China and Southeast Asia. The spider possesses a dark black and brown body, along with black stripes that run across its upper back. At nearly 2.36 inches in length (60 millimeters), the spider is relatively large (with a leg span of nearly eight inches), making it a formidable opponent to most insects.

The spider is known to live mostly underground, constructing burrows that are lined with silk to alert it to prey. As a nocturnal species, the Chinese Bird Spider primarily hunts at night, preying mostly on large insects and other spiders that may cross its path.

Chinese Bird Spider Bite Symptoms and Treatment

The Chinese Bird Spider is considered highly venomous. Although little is known about the spider’s effect on humans (due to the relatively rare occurrence of bites), small doses of its venom have proven extremely lethal to both mice and rats during laboratory experiments.

The spider’s venom contains a complex neurotoxin with several compounds known to block neurotransmitters in its victims. In the number of human cases observed, the Chinese Bird Spider’s bite caused severe nerve damage, often leaving the victim completely paralyzed within hours. Without appropriate treatment, fatalities have also been known to occur. To prevent long-term injuries (or death), experts recommend immediate medical attention.

The deadly Redback Spider.
The deadly Redback Spider. | Source

3. Redback Spider

  • Common Name: Redback Spider
  • Binomial Name: Latrodectus hasseltii
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Subphylum: Chelicerata
  • Class: Arachnida
  • Order: Araneae
  • Infraorder: Araneomorphae
  • Family: Theridiidae
  • Genus: Latrodectus
  • Species: L. hasseltii
  • Synonyms: Latrodectus scelio (Thorell, 1870); Latrodectus scelio indicus (Simon, 1897); Latrodectus indicus (Pocock, 1900); Latrodectus hasselti indicus (Pickard-Cambridge, 1902); Latrodectus ancorifer (Dahl, 1902); Latrodectus hasselti aruensis (Strand, 1911); Latrodectus hasselti ancorifer (Kulczynski, 1911); Latrodectus cinctus (Gerschman and Schiapelli, 1942); Latrodectus mactans hasselti (Chrysanthus, 1975)

Characteristics

The Redback Spider – also known as the "Australian Black Widow" – is a species of highly venomous spider from the Theridiidae family. Found predominantly in Australia, Southeast Asia, and New Zealand, the Redback Spider is a species known to seek shelter near (or inside) human dwellings. The Redback is easily identifiable due to its spherical black body, red stripe, and reddish-orange hourglass along its abdominal area (similar to the Black Widow). Although relatively small (at only 0.4 inches), the Redback Spider is a formidable opponent to most insects.

As a nocturnal species, the spider primarily hunts at night, and has been known to prey on various bugs, other spiders, and a variety of small vertebrates. Using its web as a form of “glue,” the Redback Spider is known to subdue its prey with web as it repeatedly bites its victim’s head; rendering the bug or animal completely paralyzed within seconds. Although the Redback Spider primarily feeds on insects, it has been known to eat small lizards and even snakes on occasion.

Redback Spider Bite Symptoms and Treatment

Throughout Australia, the Redback Spider is responsible for more bites than any other species of spider in the region. Each year, approximately 2,000 to 10,000 people are bitten by the spider due to their preference for warm spaces indoors. The Redback Spider’s venom is incredibly strong, and is one of the few spiders in the world capable of inflicting serious harm to humans. Its venom contains a mixture of cellular constituents, enzymes, and toxins, including the neurotoxin known as alpha-latrotoxin.

Symptoms of a Redback Spider bite include severe pain, swelling, extreme sweating, vomiting, nausea, muscle spasms, and convulsions. The onset of symptoms is relatively rapid (within an hour), and can also include chest pain, headaches, hypertension, and extreme drowsiness. Pain can last for several weeks, with complications such as pulmonary oedema, respiratory failure, coma, seizures, and skin infections relatively common. Children and individuals with compromised immune systems are at the greatest risk for death; however, healthy adults have been known to die from severe envenomation as much as thirty days after the bite took place. For this reason, the Redback Spider is incredibly dangerous.

Treatment (which includes antivenom) is the best line of defense against the Redback Spider, and is often effective if prompt medical care is given right away.

The highly-venomous and deadly Brazilian Wandering Spider.
The highly-venomous and deadly Brazilian Wandering Spider. | Source

2. Brazilian Wandering Spider

  • Common Name: Brazilian Wandering Spider
  • Binomial Name: Phoneutria fera
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Subphylum: Chelicerata
  • Class: Arachnida
  • Order: Araneae
  • Infraorder: Araneomorphae
  • Family: Ctenidae
  • Genus: Phoneutria
  • Species: P. fera
  • Synonyms: Ctenus ferus (Perty, 1833); Ctenus sus (Strand, 1909)

Characteristics

The Brazilian Wandering Spider is a highly venomous species endemic to the tropical regions of South America. Also known as the “Armed Spider” or “Banana Spider,” this species of spider is extremely large (5.1 to 5.9 inches), and can be easily identified by its hairy appearance, along with its dark, linear stripes that cross its black and brown-colored body.

The spider gets its name from its natural tendency to “wander” the jungle floor; particularly during the night hours. They are frequently found hiding in termite mounds, banana trees, under fallen logs, or rocks due to its preference for dark and moist areas. Currently, the Wandering Spider is found predominantly in the forests of Costa Rica, Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, and Guyana.

Brazilian Wandering Spider Bite Symptoms and Treatment

The Brazilian Wandering Spider is extremely venomous, and is one of the few spiders known to pose a threat to human life. The spider’s venom contains potent neurotoxins (known as PhTx3) that inhibit glutamate release, calcium intake, and glutamate uptake in an individual’s neural synapses. Upon biting its victim, the deadly venom causes muscle spasms as well as breathing difficulties, eventually resulting in paralysis and asphyxiation (if left untreated). The venom is also known to stimulate an individual’s sensory nerves, causing extreme pain, swelling, and inflammation throughout the body.

Potent enough to kill a mouse with a single bite, the Brazilian Wandering Spider’s venom is quite harmful to humans, with several documented cases of human deaths reported in recent years (particularly among the young and elderly). Fortunately, fatal bites from the Wandering Spider are relatively rare due to its small mouth and inability to inject large quantities of venom into human skin.

The highly-venomous Six-Eyed Sand Spider; the deadliest spider in the world.
The highly-venomous Six-Eyed Sand Spider; the deadliest spider in the world. | Source

1. Six-Eyed Sand Spider

  • Common Name: Six-Eyed Sand Spider
  • Binomial Name: Hexophthalma
  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Subphylum: Chelicerata
  • Class: Arachnida
  • Order: Araneae
  • Infraorder: Araneomorphae
  • Family: Sicariidae
  • Genus: Hexophthalma

Characteristics

The Six-Eyed Sand Spider is a species of highly-venomous spider from the Sicariidae family. First discovered in the late 1800s, the Six-Eyed Sand Spider is medium-sized (0.6 inches to 2 inches in length) and is found predominantly in the deserts of Southern Africa. The spider can be easily identified due to the presence of small hairs that cover its body, as well as its reddish-brown (occasionally yellow) coloration. This coloration, along with its natural ability to hold particles of sand against its body, allow the Six-Eyed Spider to easily blend into its natural habitat. Capable of burying itself under the sand, the spider is known to ambush its prey which include scorpions, as well as small bugs and insects.

Six-Eyed Sand Spider Bite Symptoms and Treatment

The Six-Eyed Sand Spider is highly venomous. Recent investigative studies have shown that the spider’s venom is more lethal than any species of spider in the world (making it a clear choice for the number one spot on this list). Although very shy (and non-aggressive), human bites do occur on occasion with serious results. Its venom possesses a harmful necrotic agent, along with a potent hemolytic known to burst red blood cells in its victims. Common symptoms of a Six-Eyed Spider bite include massive hemorrhaging, severe pain, nausea, abdominal pain, and severe skin necrosis.

Little is known about the spider’s effect on humans, as only two human cases have been observed over the last century. In one case, the victim lost his arm, while the other died from a massive loss of blood. Laboratory experiments have indicated that the Six-Eyed Spider’s venom is lethal to rabbits within five hours. With no form of antivenom in existence, bites from these spiders are generally believed to be extremely serious, and similar to the effects of rattlesnake bites. For these reasons, the Six-Eyed Sand Spider is considered the deadliest and most dangerous species of spider in the world.

Suggestions for Further Reading

  • Bradley, Richard A. and Steve Buchanan. Common Spiders of North America. Oakland, California: University of California Press, 2013.
  • Foelix, Rainer. Biology of Spiders. New York, New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.

Works Cited

Books/Articles:

  • Black Widow Spiders. Accessed August 06, 2019. https://www.poison.org/articles/2012-jun/black-widow-spiders.
  • “Black Widow Spiders.” National Geographic, September 24, 2018. https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/invertebrates/group/black-widow-spiders/.
  • Ashish. "Brazilian Wandering Spider (Phoneutria): Science ABC. May 07, 2019. Accessed August 06, 2019. https://www.scienceabc.com/nature/animals/brazilian-wandering-spider-bite-attacks-and-other-facts.html.
  • "Brown Recluse Spider." Entomology. University of Kentucky. Accessed August 06, 2019. https://entomology.ca.uky.edu/ef631.
  • "Redback Spider." Spider Facts and Information. Accessed August 06, 2019. https://www.spidersworlds.com/redback-spider/.
  • "World's Deadliest Spider: The Funnel-web." Australian Geographic. July 10, 2019. Accessed August 06, 2019. https://www.australiangeographic.com.au/topics/wildlife/2017/02/worlds-deadliest-spider-the-sydney-funnel-web/.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

Questions & Answers

  • What is the difference between venomous and poisonous?

    Contrary to popular belief, there is a fundamental difference between venomous and poisonous animals. Venomous refers to an animal that either bites or stings to inject their toxins into a victim. Poisonous, on the other hand, refers to animals that release their toxins via a non-aggressive means (i.e. from being touched or eaten). Although both venom and poison are toxins, venom is only effective if it enters the body's bloodstream, while poison can be absorbed through the skin or from consumption. In short, the difference between the two lies in their molecular composition and the means from which they are delivered.

© 2019 Larry Slawson

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment
    • Larry Slawson profile imageAUTHOR

      Larry Slawson 

      6 months ago from North Carolina

      Thank you my friends :) So glad you guys enjoyed the article!

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 

      6 months ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Really a neat article. Required reading for my son and I tonight.

    • Miebakagh57 profile image

      Miebakagh Fiberesima 

      6 months ago from Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NIGERIA.

      Hi, Larry, spiders are very dangerous insects. They foods which consists mortly of dangerous insects make them more letheral. Two days ago, I saw something very unusual, and it was flying. As I look more it was a spider. No wonder certain persons will never know what bite them. Thanks for sharing an informative article.

    • Larry Slawson profile imageAUTHOR

      Larry Slawson 

      6 months ago from North Carolina

      Thank you Angel :) Haha, yes that would be an interesting article. And I agree.. I don't want to get near any of these spiders either! Lol

    • Angel Guzman profile image

      Angel Guzman 

      6 months ago from Joliet, Illinois

      Larry very well researched and scary read! I do not want to get near any one of these! I wouldn't be against watching the sand and walking spiders fight each other, lol. Hmm maybe for your next article you can write the benefits of spiders. Happy Holidays and Cheers to a Great New Year.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, owlcation.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://maven.io/company/pages/privacy

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
    ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)