Katydids: A Short, Sedentary, Solitary Life - Owlcation - Education
Updated date:

Katydids: A Short, Sedentary, Solitary Life

Dorothy is a Master Gardener, former newspaper reporter, and the author of several books. Michael is a landscape/nature photographer in NM.

A female Katydid making her way through the leaves of a plant.  She is a master at camouflage and if is very hard to find her among the leaves.

A female Katydid making her way through the leaves of a plant. She is a master at camouflage and if is very hard to find her among the leaves.

Discovered Quite by Accident

We recently discovered two female Katydids in our yard and our curiosity was aroused, as both of these had what appeared (to us) to be egg sacks hanging from the backside. We were wrong of course, and my research resulted in this article, which will show you some photos and explain exactly what it was that we were seeing. At this point, I would like to refer you to the section entitled “Breeding.”

The body of a Katydid resembles a green leaf, right down to the detailed veins, and we spotted these quite by accident. Apparently, we didn’t scare or threaten them, as they are known to fly away quickly in those cases.

All of the photos were taken by Michael McKenney are of the two female Katydids on our backyard plants, although there are hundreds of species found all around the world. We're pretty sure there's a male Katydid in our yard somewhere, although we haven't seen him yet.

In the close-up insert photo you can see the  tympanum, a slit-like or flat patch on each front leg that enables them to hear the sounds of the other Katydids.

In the close-up insert photo you can see the tympanum, a slit-like or flat patch on each front leg that enables them to hear the sounds of the other Katydids.

Their Description

Katydids are related to crickets and grasshoppers (in the order Orthoptera) and are usually green sometimes with brown markings. They are medium-sized to large insects and have a thick body, which is usually higher than it is wide. Their legs are long and thin and the hind legs are longer than the front or middle legs and are usually used for jumping. Their chewing mouthparts are on their head along with two long, thin antennae that extend back at least to the abdomen.

Adults of some Katydid species are able to fly, and virtually all of the species are camouflaged to blend in with their surroundings (mainly leaves). In all species of Katydids, their front wings have specially-shaped structures that are rubbed together in order to create sounds. They are equipped with flat patches on their legs that serve the same purpose as a human’s ears (called a tympanum, a slit-like or flat patch on each front leg), which enable them to hear the sounds of the other Katydids. They are able to pick up the sound more clearly by raising their leg.

In this photo, you are able to see the ovipositor clearly, the tubular organ through which this female Katydid will deposit her eggs, which will hatch in the spring.  Shortly after she deposits the eggs she will die.

In this photo, you are able to see the ovipositor clearly, the tubular organ through which this female Katydid will deposit her eggs, which will hatch in the spring. Shortly after she deposits the eggs she will die.

Males Sing in Unison

There are several things about Katydids that are noteworthy, none of which is more interesting than their mating calls, one of the loudest and most familiar calls of summer. Katydids are nocturnal “singers” and each different species has its own characteristic song. The males apparently sing in unison, but they are not trying to harmonize...far from it. They sing by rubbing one of their hind legs against one of their wings, and each of the males is trying to sing out the loudest and be the first to hit a note in order to attract a female mate.

Scientists have discovered that the females of several acoustic insects such as Katydids, when given the choice of two identical males, have been shown to be partial to the one that leads in the mating call.

The songs of Katydids differ as to their purpose. The singing might be for mating purposes, as described above, or for establishing a territory. The song could also be a sign of aggression toward other insects, or for establishing a defense against threats.

Songs are species-specific, but different species are able to hear the calls of others.

This female Katydid has already found her mate and will soon be laying eggs somewhere on a plant stem or a leaf, although she will not get the opportunity to raise her young, and instead will leave them to hatch in the spring as she goes off to die.

This female Katydid has already found her mate and will soon be laying eggs somewhere on a plant stem or a leaf, although she will not get the opportunity to raise her young, and instead will leave them to hatch in the spring as she goes off to die.

Their Habitat

There are hundreds of Katydid species and they are found all over the world except on the southernmost continent of Antarctica, a virtually uninhabited ice-covered landmass. On the other hand, as is the case with most insect groups, the greatest numbers of their species are found in the tropical, frost-free areas of the world. They are not social insects and don’t live in groups. As a matter of fact, rarely will you ever see more than one of them in any small given area. They are considered to be solitary and sedentary creatures, having no interaction with humans at all.

Although Katydids are not endangered, some species have become rare because of the disappearance of some particular habitats or food plants they need.

There are over 250 species in North America, most of which are in the family Tettigoniidae and divided among 7-10 sub-families. The ones that are more commonly found are the “true Katydids” (Pseudophyllinae), the “false Katydids” (Phaneropterinae), “meadow katydids” (Conocephalinae), “shield-backed Katydids” (Tettigoniinae, often divided into three subfamilies), and “cone-headed katydids” (Copiphorinae, often included with the meadow katydids.

the-brief-interesting-life-of-a-katydid

Breeding

What we had originally thought to be an egg sack dangling from the back of the Katydid turned out to be a packet of sperm cells that are passed from a male to a female. The female in the photo above is starting to stretch her head below and backward to the jelly-like substance, the outer layer of which she will eat.

The female, in order to lay her eggs, will use an organ at the back of her abdomen called an ovipositor. With precision, she will inject her grey, oval-shaped eggs onto a stem, leaf edge or on the ground. The eggs are laid at the end of summer or beginning of fall and are dormant during the winter months, hatching in the spring.

the-brief-interesting-life-of-a-katydid

The Growth Cycle of a Katydid

Katydids have incomplete metamorphosis. The nymph that hatches from an egg of a Katydid looks a lot like an adult but missing the wings. As they grow, they shed their exoskeletons in a process called molting. During their final molt, they gain their wings and become adults, which is the end of their growing and molting.

The life of a Katydid is usually a short one – most live for only about a year or less. Usually, only the eggs of a Katydid are able to survive the winter although, in tropical areas, some adult species are able to live for several years.

Predators of Katydids

Their ability to camouflage has aided the Katydids, but they are not without some natural predators during their brief lives, including snakes, birds, some spiders, frogs, bats, and shrews. They have learned to adapt and have come up with ways to hide, having been born with an uncanny ability to pose like leaves and mimic other insects.

The Diet of a Katydid

Katydids in areas other than the tropics are primarily leaf-eaters, although they often eat other plant parts and are also fond of flowers. They have been known to eat dead insects, insect eggs and aphids, especially in the tropics where they are mainly predaceous (preying on other animals).

How the Katydid Got Its Common Name

Katydids get their name from the perceived sound they make with their repetitive calls and clicks, and over the years there have been people who believe that the call of a Katydid sounds like someone calling out the words "Katy Did! Katy Didn't! Katy Did! Katy Didn't!" so that’s where the common name comes from. Both the male and female are capable of making the sound.

References

  1. Hartbauer, M. & L. Haitsziner, M. Kainz, H. Romer (2014), Competition and Cooperation in a Synchronous Bushcricket Chorus, Royal Society Open Science Journal, Royal Society Publishing, October 8, 2014
  2. Forey, Pamela; and Cecilia Fitzsimons (1987), An Instant Guide to Insects, Gramercy Books, New York

© 2018 Mike and Dorothy McKenney

Comments

Jazy on June 23, 2020:

I live in Texas, so i hope that helps with what breed he is, but a katydid lived in my bedroom for a solid 3 weeks until i eventually found him. I looked up what to feed him, and my older brother and I made him a habitat. He was already missing a hind leg, and one of his antennas was cut super short. We fed him lettuce and celery, and he's been chilling in my room and his home for about a week. We named him Spencer. While i was cleaning my room though, i felt something crawling on my ankle, and with instinct, i swiped it hard without noticing it was him, and his other leg fell off. I felt so bad, and i even cried. He looked fine though, and was struggling, but still walking around on his other 4 legs. I put him in his habitat so he didn't get stuck under something, and I could see if he needed help, considering he kept falling over. I went to bed, and woke up this morning, and he's alive and everything, but he can't move. I carried him onto my bed so i can watch him, see if maybe he's just sleeping, but he is struggling to walk across my pillow. I don't know what to do. Do i put him out of his misery, put him back in the wild, or just keep taking care of him. I really don't want to kill him, but if need be and it helps him feel at ease, do I? Please help, i feel so bad!!!

BBandtheKing on January 04, 2020:

Hello, my sons and I saved a katydid from certain death earlier this week when we heard a bird repeatedly thrashing something against the driveway. We went to investigate and after scaring the bird off found a dazed and confused katydid. It was obviously injured so we decided to bring it indoors and create a pop-up insect hospital.

I looked online to figure out what this alien like bug was and what sort of environment and nourishment it would need to survive. After setting the tank up we decided to name it Katy Did Brown (our last name) and keep it until it seemed to be feeling better.

After 2 days it was eating leaves and doing its a slow creep around the new environment. We were really excited to have this very interesting houseguest and started to reconsider releasing it. On day three we watched in astonishment as she laid 3 eggs on one of the branches in her tank. My whole house was cheering knowing that we may get to see baby katydids sometime soon.

Then 2 days later we woke up and found that Katy had died. Of course we were devastated and even guilty, thinking we may have contributed to her demise by keeping her in a tank. We buried her outside and laid a camellia flower over her little grave.

Once the funeral was over, I started searching online for what may have happened. Thankfully I found your article that explained that Katydid females die shortly after laying eggs. My sons and I talked about it and are now hoping that her eggs may hatch in the spring so we can see her babies.

Kelly Brown

Mike and Dorothy McKenney (author) from United States on September 10, 2019:

They have probably gotten into some kind of pesticide and are all slowly dying. Sometimes, people spray the edges of their house to keep insects out but almost any insect that gets into it will be affected. Sorry about this because they are such fun to watch out on plants.

Aspen Bunyak on September 02, 2019:

There are katydids all of my porch, just laying around and don't move some are dead some are not, why is this?

Nan on August 22, 2019:

Thanks for the article. I also heard a loud “scream”/shriek in the middle of the normal cricketing noises of summer. Next, I saw a bright green leaf stumbling along the ground. At first I thought it was something newly hatched. Now I think it was a katydid mom about to die. : (. Perhaps at egg-laying birth it’s a little like real labor and painful: hence the high-pitched scream I heard? Any idea if that could be?

Mike and Dorothy McKenney (author) from United States on August 12, 2019:

That is very interesting. I have never heard them scream and I'm sure I would have fainted at the sight of it on my finger...lol.

Judy on August 06, 2019:

I tried to brush a green insect off my car today and it latched onto my finger screaming. Had no idea what it was ... shook it off my finger and onto the ground...it continued screaming. Looking at these pictures I believe it was a Katydid.

Mike and Dorothy McKenney (author) from United States on October 12, 2018:

Thank you. I am so glad to have a few of them calling our backyard their home, even though it is for a short while, as they die so young. Thanks!

Mike and Dorothy McKenney (author) from United States on October 11, 2018:

And thank you!!

Chitrangada Sharan from New Delhi, India on October 11, 2018:

Excellent and informative article about Katydids!

I have seen them so many times—Amazing creatures indeed! You did a nice job by providing so many relevant details about them, which I didn’t know about.

Thanks for sharing this well presented article.

Mike and Dorothy McKenney (author) from United States on October 10, 2018:

I couldn't believe how little I knew about them, Pamela. Probably because I just haven't been looking hard enough. I go outside every day now trying to find eggs that they have deposited. I know they will, and I want Mike to get some really great pictures of them. Thanks again for your comment and for reading!

Pamela Oglesby from Sunny Florida on October 10, 2018:

It is amazing how the Katydid blends in with just another leaf. i have always heard about them, but seldom seen them. The facts of their existence is very interesting. I like all the good pictures you presented with the facts.