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The Monkey Puzzle Tree - An Unusual and Endangered Plant

A young monkey puzzle tree in a botanical garden; the appearance of the tree changes as it matures
A young monkey puzzle tree in a botanical garden; the appearance of the tree changes as it matures | Source

An Unusual Tree

The monkey puzzle tree is an unusual, attractive and very interesting plant. Its ancestors coexisted with the dinosaurs and formed large forests. The modern tree has strange leaves, a distinctive trunk and branches that emerge from the trunk in whorls. The female trees produce large and tasty seeds which are very popular in some parts of the world. As it matures, the tree loses its lower branches and becomes a tall and very imposing plant.

The monkey puzzle tree, or Araucaria araucana, is an evergreen conifer that is native to Chile and Argentina. It's the national tree of Chile. The tree's common name comes from the idea that a monkey would be unable to climb it. It's also known as the Chilean pine or the Chile pine, although it's not a member of the pine family. The tree grows slowly and lives for hundreds of years. It has been introduced to many places around the world, where it grows as an ornamental plant.

Monkey puzzle trees in the snow in Chile
Monkey puzzle trees in the snow in Chile | Source

Monkey puzzle trees and pine trees belong to the plant order known as the Pinales. The monkey puzzle tree belongs to the family Araucariaceae within this order while pine trees belong to the family Pinaceae.

Trunk and Leaves

Monkey puzzle trees are fascinating plants that some people consider to be weird or even bizarre. Mature trees may reach 150 feet in height - or even higher according to some sources - and have a trunk diameter of up to 7 feet. Another startling fact is that the trees are thought to live for as long as a thousand years.

The first thing that strikes an observer of a young tree is probably its upright form and its symmetrical shape. If the observer moves closer, they will see the tree's strange leaves and trunk.

The leaves of the monkey puzzle tree are thick and stiff and have a pointed tip. The leaves overlap each other and completely cover the branches. They are sometimes said to look "reptilian" because they remind people of a reptile's scales. The trunk is grey in color and has circular ridges.

As the tree matures, the ridges on the bottom of the trunk start to look like folds. The base of the trunk eventually resembles an elephant's foot. The lower branches of the tree fall off, leaving a crown of branches at the tip and a tall trunk underneath. The crown is often umbrella shaped. The overall effect is impressive because of the great height of the tree.

The "reptilian" leaves of a monkey puzzle tree
The "reptilian" leaves of a monkey puzzle tree | Source
Spiny leaves growing on the trunk of a very young monkey puzzle tree
Spiny leaves growing on the trunk of a very young monkey puzzle tree | Source

Cones and Seeds

Monkey puzzle trees are either male or female. The cones are borne on the upper branches. The male cones are also known as pollen cones and the female cones are known as seed cones. Pollination (transfer of pollen from the male cones to the female cones) is by wind. The cones take eighteen months or longer to mature.

The male cones are 3 to 5 inches long when fully mature, while the more spherical female cones reach 6 to 12 inches. The latter may weigh several pounds. There are reports of some cones weighing as much as ten pounds. It's not a good idea to stand under a monkey puzzle tree when it's dropping its cones!

The seeds of the monkey puzzle tree are large, edible and - according to people who have eaten them - delicious. They are about the size of an almond and form a staple food in parts of South America. They also have a spiritual significance for indigenous people. The seeds are eaten raw or are boiled or roasted. They are also milled into a flour that is used to make bread and fermented to make a beverage.

A male cone
A male cone | Source
A female cone
A female cone | Source

Introduction of the Tree to Britain

Archibald Menzies was a British Navy surgeon and a plant collector. He's credited with the British discovery of the monkey puzzle tree while on a voyage with Captain George Vancouver in H.M.S. Discovery.

In 1795, Archibald Menzies and other officers from the Discovery attended a meal hosted by the Governor of Chile. They were served a dessert of seeds from the monkey puzzle tree. Menzies saved some of the seeds and germinated them on board the ship. When he returned to Britain he had five young monkey puzzle trees with him. They were planted in the Royal Botanic Garden at Kew.

The monkey puzzle trees seen in most parks and gardens today are juveniles. People might think that they need to take a trip to South America to see the mature trees. There is at least one place in Britain where older trees can be viewed, however - on the grounds of Bicton Agricultural College in Devon.

The Monkey Puzzle Avenue at Bicton Agricultural College

Why are Monkey Puzzle Trees Endangered?

The IUCN, or International Union for Conservation of Nature, has classified the wild monkey puzzle tree population as endangered. This is worrying information. It would be very sad to lose this unique tree from the Earth.

The number of monkey puzzle trees has been reduced due to deforestation caused by logging and burning. These activities are used to clear trees from land so that it can be used to grow crops or to provide a grazing area for animals. Monkey puzzle trees are actually quite resistant to fires caused by natural causes but are less able to protect themselves from fires deliberately set by people. The tree is also harvested for its fine-grained wood. It's illegal to cut down a wild monkey puzzle tree, but unfortunately this law is often disobeyed.

The population of monkey puzzle trees is becoming fragmented as trees are destroyed. Since the trees grow so slowly and don't reproduce for many years after seed germination, they can't recover from population stresses very well. They are protected in some parts of their range, but they need more help.

A very young monkey puzzle tree in a container, showing the branches arranged in whorls
A very young monkey puzzle tree in a container, showing the branches arranged in whorls | Source

Growing the Trees from Seeds and Seedlings

Outside of their native habitat, monkey puzzle trees grow well in Britain and in the Pacific Northwest region of North America (Oregon, Washington and British Columbia). They also grow in Northern California and in some other parts of North America.

The tree does best in a mild climate that receives a good supply of rain. It likes full sunlight. It grows in a wide variety of soils as long as they are well drained. The tree will tolerate salt spray from the ocean. However, it doesn't do well in a hot, dry climate or in polluted areas. It's classified as hardy to zone 7.

Seeds or seedlings of a monkey puzzle tree produces a lovely ornamental plant. The tree is sometimes grown in a container as a house plant. Patience is needed if the grower wants to obtain seeds from the tree, however, and there is no guarantee of success.

Monkey puzzle trees grow very slowly. The seeds generally germinate in one to two months. It may take as long as thirty to forty years before new seeds are produced, and even then this will only happen if a tree is a female and if there is a male tree in the area. The gender of a tree can be determined only when cones are produced.

A tree needs to be planted while a person is relatively young if they hope to harvest seeds during their lifetime. If it's too late for this, the future ability of the tree to bear seeds (if it's a female) would have to be a gift to descendants or to people who buy the property containing the tree.

A monkey puzzle tree seedling
A monkey puzzle tree seedling | Source

Repotting Monkey Puzzle Tree Seedlings

Monkey Puzzle Tree Trivia - The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

A monkey puzzle tree played a significant role in in the 1947 movie "The Ghost and Mrs. Muir", which starred Gene Tierney and Rex Harrison. In the movie, Mrs. Muir purchases Gull Cottage. The cottage is haunted by Captain Gregg, the previous owner of the home. A friendship develops between Mrs. Muir and the Captain, although the pair both have strong personalities and frequently argue with each other.

Mrs. Muir orders the beautiful monkey puzzle tree in the garden to be cut down because its branches broke one of the cottage's windows during a windstorm. The destruction of the monkey puzzle tree that he planted both angers and hurts the Captain. The incident also appears in one episode of the "The Ghost and Mrs. Muir" TV show, which was aired in 1968. The movie has a happy ending, however. When Mrs. Muir dies of old age, the Captain comes to greet her. The pair leave Gull Cottage, united in spirit form.

Monkey puzzle trees do have a way of making themselves noticed, whether in movies or in real life. They are distinctive trees that grow very well in my area. I enjoy observing them and find them very appealing plants.

The branches of a monkey puzzle tree provide shade in a botanical garden.
The branches of a monkey puzzle tree provide shade in a botanical garden. | Source

© 2014 Linda Crampton

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Comments 114 comments

CMHypno profile image

CMHypno 2 years ago from Other Side of the Sun

What an interesting hub Alicia and beautiful photographs. Monkey Puzzle Trees take me back to my childhood because there was a very large one in the front garden of the house where I used to go to my ballet lessons. There is quite a few of them in larger gardens where I grew up in south Devon, they seem to like the mild, damp climate


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the comment, Cynthia. As in Devon, the climate is mild and often wet where I live. Monkey puzzle trees like it here, too! There's a tree in two different gardens just a short walk from my house.


VioletteRose profile image

VioletteRose 2 years ago from Chicago

What a beautiful tree! I hope they will be saved. Thanks for sharing this information on the monkey puzzle trees, I am pinning this.


Jodah profile image

Jodah 2 years ago from Queensland Australia

I have never heard of a monkey puzzle tree Alicia. In he first picture I thought it looked similar to one of our Australian tree, the Bunya Pine which also has huge cones containing edible seeds(nuts), but when you showed that it has spikes up the trunk while young and then loses the lower branches as it ages I realised they were different. besides, as you said, it isn't a pine. Very interesting hub, voted up.


billybuc profile image

billybuc 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

Endangered? I didn't know that, but that would explain not seeing many of them around. I saw quite a few of these when I was a child. Very interesting.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you for the comment and the pin, VioletteRose! I appreciate your visit.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks for the comment and the vote, Jodah. The Bunya Pine is another fascinating tree. I'm in the process of writing a hub about it!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Bill. Yes, the tree is endangered in the wild. There do seem to be quite a lot in gardens, at least where I live.


Blond Logic profile image

Blond Logic 2 years ago from Brazil

I never knew much about them other than I admired one my relative had in her garden in Britain.

Fascinating hub.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the comment, Blond Logic. I appreciate your visit.


bdegiulio profile image

bdegiulio 2 years ago from Massachusetts

Hi Linda. I have never heard of the Monkey Puzzle Tree and can't say that I have ever seen one. How interesting. I'll have to ask around here to see if anyone knows if there are any in the area. Great job, thanks for the education.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

I appreciate your comment, Bill. Thanks for the visit.


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

Thank you for sharing about the unusual Monkey Puzzell Tree. I have never seen one before. When I saw the young one there in your photo, it reminds me a bit of the Yucca plant, but of course they do not grow into a tree. I would love to see a Monkey Puzzle Tree. I always learn something new when reading your interesting hubs.

Up +++ and away


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you, Faith. I always appreciate your kind comments and votes!


truthfornow profile image

truthfornow 2 years ago from New Orleans, LA

I have never heard of or seen this type of tree - there you go teaching me something about nature again.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, truthfornow. Thanks for the comment!


DDE profile image

DDE 2 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

Most unusual and so beautiful.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you for the visit and the comment, Devika.


FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

What a fascinating tree! Thanks for sharing information on it and beautiful images. I had never heard of it. It's a shame that people are dishonoring laws about cutting them down.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Flourish. I agree - the monkey puzzle tree is fascinating! Thanks for the comment.


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 2 years ago from Essex, UK

Very attractive hub Linda about these most distinctive trees. Here in Britain I remember quite a lot of monkey puzzles when I was growing up. At the time I didn't appreciate their odd shape, but now I find them curious and strangely beautiful and very different from the normal trees one sees in the countryside. Sad to hear they are endangered in the wild, and they also don't seem to be so common nowadays here in Britain, though that may just be down to the part of the country in which I now live.

The history is interesting and the photos are beautiful, and the videos are well chosen. The lay out of the hub is also appealing. Voted up accordingly (and shared) Alun


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the comment, the vote and the share, Alun. I appreciate your visit. "Curious and strangely beautiful" is exactly the right way to describe monkey puzzle trees, in my opinion!


chef-de-jour profile image

chef-de-jour 2 years ago from Wakefield, West Yorkshire,UK

Monkey puzzle trees are a bit strange yet very appealing. I always need to stop if I'm walking and pass one in a garden, they're just so unusual - odd but beautiful shapes - a mathematician's plant. I love their spiky profile too.

I didn't know they were in danger, like many trees in the wild, so your hub may help bring attention to their plight.

Votes and a share for a hub about this ancient tree.


joanveronica profile image

joanveronica 2 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

Hi from Chile! I've just read this Hub, thank you for posting it. It was a really strange sensation to read about this beauty which is part of the scenery where I live. In fact the photo with the snow covered trees is one of the best I've ever seen. I used it in a post on my blog, and I love it! I've eaten the seeds many times, there is a period of the year when they can be found by the basketful in the food markets. Delicious! The Pehuenche Native Americans live in the Andes region near my hometown of Concepcion. They are known as the "People of the Pignon" which is the name of the tree and the seeds. They cook with the seeds, it's their livelihood. Their unique cuisine has now become a tourist attraction which has been great, because it has provided these people with a source of income they so badly need. The trees that show in the video are a long way from being "adult" they would need about 500 more years, I would think! Great post, I enjoyed it.


iguidenetwork profile image

iguidenetwork 2 years ago from Austin, TX

Wow.. so you really need to be patient in growing a monkey puzzle tree. It's really a unique and beautiful tree. I also watched a video about the monkey puzzle seed, where a guy got to taste it for the first time. He said it was nice, but rather complex and hard to describe ("puzzle" indeed). Thanks for sharing your interesting hub. I like things like botany too.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, chef-de-jour. Thanks for the vote and the share. I love your idea of the monkey puzzle tree as a "mathematician's plant"!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you for sharing the very interesting and informative facts, Joan! I'm glad that the monkey puzzle seeds are so helpful for people.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, iguidenetwork. Yes, patience is certainly important when growing a monkey puzzle tree! I have never tasted the seeds myself. That would be an interesting experience!


annart profile image

annart 2 years ago from SW England

I'm not surprised to find out that they're endangered as we see far fewer these days. I love them and there are quite a few in the south west of England; I think the climate suits them quite well. They always look so 'fluffy'!

Great hub! Ann


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Ann. "Fluffy" is a good word to describe the young trees! Thank you very much for the comment.


sallybea profile image

sallybea 2 years ago from Norfolk

AliciaC

I have seen several Monkey Puzzle trees growing in the UK, usually planted unwisely in too small an area. I don't think people realize sometimes that they can grow quite so large. I saw them in South Africa when I lived there but I never realized that one could eat any part of them. Very informative and interesting hub - thank you for sharing.

Sally


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Sally. Yes, the two trees in my neighbourhood are already filling the front gardens of the homes. I wonder myself if the house owners know how huge the trees can become! Thank you for the visit and the comment.


Suzanne Day profile image

Suzanne Day 2 years ago from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

This looks like a very unusual tree. I quite like the shape of it and think I've seen some planted ornamentally here in Melbourne. I didn't know they were a prehistoric type of tree, but I will be keeping my eyes open for them to point out to my kids as we go around. Voted useful!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Suzanne. Thanks for the comment. Monkey puzzle trees are definitely worth observing!


aviannovice profile image

aviannovice 2 years ago from Stillwater, OK

I had never heard of this tree until now. At your initial picture, at first I thought that it was a palm relative. What makes it most interesting, is the fact that it can grow in so many different parts of the world. I do hope that it will proliferate once again. Perhaps a protected forest somewhere is in order.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Deb. Yes, the monkey puzzle tree is versatile with respect to the area that it can inhabit. Like you, I hope that it proliferates in its natural habitat. It's an interesting and useful tree.


WriterJanis profile image

WriterJanis 2 years ago from California

What an interesting looking tree. I do hope they can save them. They're quite beautiful.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, WriterJanis. I think the trees are beautiful, too. It would be a great shame if they disappeared from the Earth.


Vellur profile image

Vellur 2 years ago from Dubai

Great hub, interesting and informative. Monkey puzzle trees look wonderfully unique, great photos. Voted up.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much, Vellur. I appreciate your comment and vote.


grand old lady profile image

grand old lady 2 years ago from Philippines

I now know that I have a monkey puzzle tree! I have no idea how my garden grows, but different plants emerge from it, then die. Then new plants and bushes come up. I can only blame it on pollination. Definintely I don't plant seeds. But the monkey tree, we have. Interesting to know there are many varieties of monkey trees as well.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

It sounds like you have a very interesting garden, grand old lady! The monkey puzzle tree certainly looks very different at different stages of its life. I'd love to find one hiding in my garden!


Austinstar profile image

Austinstar 2 years ago from Somewhere in the universe

Congratulations on winning the Best All-Around Hub! And, by Jove, it's a great hub indeed!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you so much, Austinstar! I appreciate your kind comment and congratulations.


aka-rms profile image

aka-rms 2 years ago from USA

Congratulations. I can see why this one won. Very interesting!


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

Congratulations, dear Alicia!!! This hub is certainly Best All-Around Hub! All of your hubs are truly fantastic.

Blessings and love always


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the comment and the congratulations, aka-rms!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you so much for the very kind comment and the lovely congratulations, Faith!! I appreciate your visit. Congratulations to you on your very well deserved Hubbie award, too! Blessings and best wishes to you.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida

Congrats on winning the Best All Around Hub! What an honor. It is a stellar Hub for sure.

Very interesting to read and informative. I'd sure like to see one of these trees!

Voted UP, etc.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the congratulations, Mary! I appreciate your visit and comment. I am very honored by the win and grateful for the award.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

I thought I knew a lot about odd trees until I read this hub, Alicia. If I lived in a cooler climate I would have to grow one these beautiful and interesting trees.

Congratulation on your well deserved Hubbie award on this fine article. It is well earned. :)


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the kind comment and the congratulations, Randy! I'm happy to meet someone else who thinks that monkey puzzle trees are beautiful and interesting.


joanveronica profile image

joanveronica 2 years ago from Concepcion, Chile

Hi Alicia, congratulations on winning that prize! And I'm so happy that the Araucaria tree is getting so much publicity, it's nice to think that an indigenous product of my area of the world, is getting so well known and admired by so many readers. Here in Chile they are a protected species, they can't be cut down except with a special authorization from the Forestry area of the Ministry of Agriculture (CONAF). Congratulations once again!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you for the second visit and the congratulations, joanveronica! I hope that the monkey puzzle tree is getting some publicity. It's a very worthy tree to protect!


Paula Atwell profile image

Paula Atwell 2 years ago from Cleveland, OH

Congrats and I have to say not only have I never encountered one of these, I have never heard of them before.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks, Paula. Monkey puzzle trees are interesting, but they aren't very well known in some areas. I've always lived in places where they grow well, so I'm used to seeing them!


GoodLady profile image

GoodLady 2 years ago from Rome, Italy

Congratulations ! So happy you won the award. All your Hubs are wonderfully informative. I look forward to learning all about the tree when I get back home after my holidays. I sent you an e, but you must have changed your address.

You so deserve your award. X


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you so much, GoodLady! I appreciate your visit and your very kind congratulations and comment a great deal. I hope you're having a great holiday! I'll send you an email.


AudreyHowitt profile image

AudreyHowitt 2 years ago from California

Such an interesting tree--we have one that looks somewhat like this not too far from us--now I will have to go take a better look at it


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Audrey. Yes, monkey puzzle trees are very interesting. I enjoy observing the ones in my neighbourhood.


Paula Atwell profile image

Paula Atwell 2 years ago from Cleveland, OH

My daughter thinks she wants to go to college to become a botanist. I will encourage her to read this.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much, Paula. I hope your daughter enjoys the article if she reads it.


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 2 years ago from England

Hi, I haven't thought about a monkey puzzle tree in years! How fascinating! I had totally forgotten about them, and they live for a thousand years? Wow! this was great reading Alicia, I learned so much about this amazing tree.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Nell. Thanks for the comment. I think that monkey puzzle trees are amazing, too!


goatfury profile image

goatfury 2 years ago from Richmond, VA

This is an absolutely beautiful article, ripe with great media as well. I have very little interest in the subject matter, but after looking through it, I'm interested in learning more. Wow.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, goatfury. Thank you so much for such a lovely comment! I appreciate it very much.


chateaudumer profile image

chateaudumer 2 years ago from Northern California and the Philippines

I love and enjoy reading hubs about trees, flowers and other ornamental. This tree reminds me of my Ylang-Ylang trees in my gardens at Chateau Du Mer, Boac, Marinduque, Philippines.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

I've never heard of the Ylang-Ylang tree before. Thank you for the comment and for introducing me to a new plant!


teaches12345 profile image

teaches12345 2 years ago

I am going to have to see if our local botanical garden has one of these trees. It is a shame that they are endangered. I always enjoy your posts and come away much more informed about the topics. Congratulations on your Hubbie Award!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks for the comment and the congratulations, Dianna. I appreciate them both very much! I hope you're able to find a monkey puzzle tree.


shara63 profile image

shara63 2 years ago from Delhi

Congratulations....they really did justice...it's a wonderful hub..indeed!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the kind comment, shara63!


Venkatachari M profile image

Venkatachari M 2 years ago from Hyderabad, India

Very interesting hub. You have given it a good detailed narration with beautiful images to make it a wonderful quality hub. Thank you for sharing.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much, Venkatachari M. I appreciate your comment.


RTalloni profile image

RTalloni 2 years ago from the short journey

Such a neat post about this amazing tree. It reminded me of a palm tree when I first saw the picture of the mature ones. Though it would be a shame to cut the remaining trees, the wood sounds lovely. I enjoyed learning about it. Would love to see a mature one in real life. I checked to see if seeds for eating might be for sale and the first listing is 24 seeds for 24.99! Another has a better price, offering 100 seeds for 80.99.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks for the comment, RTalloni. Those seeds for eating are expensive. It sounds like we either need to grow our own seeds or move to South America to get a reasonable price!


ladyguitarpicker profile image

ladyguitarpicker 2 years ago from 3460NW 50 St Bell, Fl32619

Hi AliciaC , I really liked reading this hub. I have never seen a tree like this one. I have a home in the woods and have many different kinds of trees.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, ladyguitarpicker. I would love to have a home in the woods! Trees, plants and forest animals are so interesting to observe. Thank you for the comment.


prasetio30 profile image

prasetio30 2 years ago from malang-indonesia

Beautiful and I have never knew about this plant. Thanks for writing and sharing with us. Again, I learn from you. Good job and Voted up!

Prasetio


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the comment and the vote, Prasetio. It's great to hear from you again! I hope things are going well for you,


Adventuretravels profile image

Adventuretravels 2 years ago from London UK

I find these trees fascinating. There's a big one near my house, I'll now look at it in a completely different light! Thanks for this and CONGRATULATIONS on your well deserved award.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the comment and the congratulations, Adventuretravels!


Nadine May profile image

Nadine May 2 years ago from Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa

Linda what an interesting hub, and just for your information, the photo of the first monkey puzzle tree was the Tree that was in front of the home that burned down in my article about my precognition dream. Never knew that they are endangered trees.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks for the comment, Nadine. I appreciate your visit. How interesting that you had a monkey puzzle tree in front of your home!


ecogranny profile image

ecogranny 2 years ago from San Francisco

It is easy to see why this hub received the Best All Around Hub for 2014. It is indeed exemplary. Congratulations!

I had never seen a monkey puzzle tree until I moved to the San Francisco Bay area. They are quite distinctive, and I marvel each time I come across another. I did not realize they were native to South America, nor that they could survive cold weather.

Beautifully written article. Thank you.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you so much for the lovely comment and congratulations, ecogranny! Monkey puzzle trees are certainly distinctive. I think they're lovely trees.


Heidi Vincent profile image

Heidi Vincent 2 years ago from GRENADA

Very interesting tree! Thanks for sharing.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you, Heidi. It's nice to meet you!


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

What an unusual (and beautiful) tree! Thanks for making it's plight of endangerment known!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thanks for the visit, Rebecca. I agree with you - the monkey puzzle tree is both unusual and beautiful!


newbizmau profile image

newbizmau 2 years ago from Mobile, AL

I loved reading through all the history. So interesting the difference in how it looks at a young age to fully mature.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you, newbizmau. I find it interesting that the monkey puzzle tree changes its appearance so dramatically, too!


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 2 years ago from Houston, Texas

I have a photo of one taken on one of our trips to the Pacific Northwest and it was either in Oregon, Washington or up in Vancouver. Will have to look at my photo albums! Thanks for filling in some information about them that I did not know. Up votes and happy to G+, pin, and share on HP.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you so much for the votes and all the shares, Peggy! I appreciate your support. It's interesting that the Pacific Northwest is such a good area for monkey puzzle trees. I'm happy that this is the case, though, because it gives me the opportunity to observe the tree.


ReviewsfromSandy profile image

ReviewsfromSandy 2 years ago from Wisconsin

Interesting tree. Just like its name.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Yes, the tree and its name are intriguing! Thanks for the comment, ReviewsfromSandy.


Patsybell profile image

Patsybell 2 years ago from zone 6a, SEMO

I have never heard of this tree before your informative hub. Now I will notice it when I visit botanical Parks. Voted up, U, I, tweet Pin.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much for the votes and the shares, Patsybell! I appreciate your visit and comment.


javr profile image

javr 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

Monkey Puzzles are very nice trees. I didn't know that they were endangered.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, javr. I think that monkey puzzle trees are very nice, too. Thanks for the visit.


Thelma Alberts profile image

Thelma Alberts 2 years ago from Germany

A beautiful tree! I love it. Thanks for the very good and useful information. Happy weekend! Good night!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you, Thelma! I hope you have a very happy weekend, too.


liamhubpages profile image

liamhubpages 23 months ago

Wow, amazing photos and a great hub! Really enjoyed reading!


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 23 months ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you very much, liamhubpages. It's nice to meet you!


Robert Benedetti 22 months ago

I just moved to Austin and would like to purchase a Monkey Puzzle tree for my property. Do you have any local recommendations please. Thanks


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 22 months ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Robert. I'm sorry, but I don't know of any monkey puzzle tree sellers in Austin. Good luck with your search. I hope you find a tree.


Don H 4 months ago

Surprised there are no comments from Florida. There are several in lot across the street here in Ft MYers. They look dissimilar from your pics but clearly have the spike nodules all over the trunk. Are they just young trees?


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 4 months ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Don H. The trees that you see could be young monkey puzzle trees. I just did a quick check online and saw a couple of reports saying that the tree is used as a landscaping plant in Florida. It seems to be popular in many places!


sahil 3 months ago

M just asked about about monkey puzzle tree in my class today but i didn't heared about it before .But after reading your post i think knew it from long ago thanks for this post


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 3 months ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Thank you for the visit and the comment, sahil.


Debra 3 months ago

Is this tree endangered in Florida? We have one dropping fruit and we would like it removed but are not sure that's possible if it is endangered.


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 3 months ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

Hi, Debra. The monkey puzzle tree isn't native to North America, so we can't really classify it as endangered on this continent. I don't know how common the tree is in Florida. I imagine that since it's an introduced plant there would be no problem in removing a tree. Perhaps the Parks Department in your area can give you more information about the tree's status in your state.


chrysathima 8 weeks ago

how could our society prevent the tree from going extinct?


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 8 weeks ago from British Columbia, Canada Author

That's a big and important question, chrysathima. I think that stopping the destruction of suitable habitats for the tree, enforcing protection laws, stopping pollution and education of the public are all necessary.

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    Linda Crampton (AliciaC)1,250 Followers
    427 Articles

    Linda Crampton is a teacher with an honours degree in biology. She loves to study nature and write about animals and plants.



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