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The Top 10 Deadliest Dinosaurs

Larry Slawson earned his Master's Degree from UNCC in 2018. He has a keen interest in dinosaurs.

From the Velociraptor to the Tyrannosaurus Rex, this article ranks the 10 deadliest dinosaurs of all time. Did your favorite dinosaur make the final 10 in our list? Read on to find out!

From the Velociraptor to the Tyrannosaurus Rex, this article ranks the 10 deadliest dinosaurs of all time. Did your favorite dinosaur make the final 10 in our list? Read on to find out!

What Was the Deadliest Dinosaur in History?

Throughout history, a number of dinosaur fossils have been unearthed by paleontologists around the world. As an incredibly diverse group of animals, dinosaurs came in all shapes and sizes, with some as small as chickens, and others the size of multiple buses. Likewise, their overall ferocity also varied significantly, with some being far more passive, while others simply dominated. This work examines and ranks the 10 deadliest dinosaurs to have ever lived. It provides a brief overview of each animal’s size, behavioral patterns, as well as general characteristics. It is the author’s hope that a better understanding (and appreciation) of these fascinating animals will accompany readers following their completion of this work.

Selection Criteria

In order to rank the world’s deadliest dinosaur species, a number of basic criteria was necessary for the extents and purposes of this work. First and foremost, it is important to note that herbivore specimens were largely excluded from this list due to their natural tendency to avoid conflict whenever possible. As such, the following list will be focused solely on carnivorous dinosaurs.

In addition to this basic element, it is important to also note that all of the following dinosaurs were selected across the entire expanse of time, as focusing on a singular era would greatly limit the available number of dinosaurs for ranking purposes. Once selected for this list, the final criteria revolved around each dinosaur’s potential to seriously harm or kill other species. For this issue to be resolved, the author closely compared each animal’s defense mechanisms, bite strength, and size as determining factors for their overall “deadliness.” Although each of these items leave room for potential gaps and discrepancies to occur, the author believes this criterion to be the best means for determining the world’s deadliest dinosaurs.

The 10 Most Dangerous Dinosaurs

  • Velociraptor
  • Mapusaurus
  • Allosaurus
  • Saurophaganax
  • Giganotosaurus
  • Majungasaurus
  • Carcharodontosaurus
  • Spinosaurus
  • Utahraptor
  • Tyrannosaurus Rex
Velociraptor.

Velociraptor.

10. Velociraptor

  • Average Size: 1’7” (Height), 6’9” (Length)
  • Average Weight: 33 to 43.5 Pounds
  • Temporal Range: Late Cretaceous Period (75 to 71 Million Years Ago)

The deadly Velociraptor refers to a genus of dromaeosaurid theropod dinosaur that first appeared 75 to 71 million years ago during the Late Cretaceous Period. Living primarily in modern-day China and Mongolia, the Velociraptor was a relatively small dinosaur that was both bipedal and feathered in its appearance. Some of the most notable features for this species included a large sickle-shaped claw on each hindfoot, along with an elongated skull, upturned snout, and short (but long) body. On average, most specimens reached an overall size of 43.5 pounds at maturity, with an average height of 1’7” (making it comparable to a large turkey in terms of size and weight).

Considered a nocturnal species by most researchers, the Velociraptor is believed to have hunted in packs as a number of fossilized remains have indicated this sort of behavior. Likewise, many scientists believe that Velociraptor was primarily a “scavenger” in the wild. Common prey likely included small lizards, amphibians, insects, rodents (of varying sizes), smaller dinosaurs, and other Velociraptors when the occasion presented itself.

How Deadly Was the Velociraptor?

Although the Velociraptor was an incredibly small dinosaur for its time, it was an incredibly dangerous (and deadly) animal due to its large sickle-shaped talons that adorned the second toe of its feet. Combined with their hand-like appendages that possessed three curved claws as well, these razor-sharp talons were capable of easily slashing (and holding) prey. Classified as a ruthless killer by many researchers, the Velociraptor could quickly devour its prey (after tearing it apart) due to the presence of 26 to 30 sharp teeth (upper and lower jaw combined). Widely spaced and serrated, the animal was capable of unleashing 1,000 PSI (pounds per square inch) of bite force on their victims; thus, allowing them to quickly subdue (and kill). Such a bite force exceeds that of the modern-day grizzly bear, who maintains a bite force of nearly 975 PSI. Taken together, it is not difficult to see why the Velociraptor was one of the deadliest dinosaurs to have ever lived.

Mapusaurus.

Mapusaurus.

9. Mapusaurus

  • Average Size: 12.3-feet (Height); 38-feet (Length)
  • Average Weight: 6,600 Pounds
  • Temporal Range: Late Cretaceous Period (97 to 93 Million Years Ago)

The Mapusaurus (meaning “Earth Lizard”) was a large carcharodontosaurid carnosaurian dinosaur that lived during the Late Cretaceous Period. Living primarily in modern-day Argentina, the Mapusaurus was first discovered by Rodolfo Coria and Phil Currie in 1997. Best-described as a large theropod that was comparable to its cousin, Gigantosaurus (in size), the Mapusaurus was an incredibly massive dinosaur capable of reaching nearly 6,600 pounds at maturity, with a height and length of approximately 12.3-feet and 38-feet, respectively. Possessing a body structure similar to that of the Tyrannosaurus Rex, the animal was renowned for its long and muscular form, with a skull that was both long and narrow. They were also believed to be incredibly fast, with a top speed of nearly 30 miles per hour.

From within its natural habitat, the Mapusaurus was a terrestrial animal that is believed to have inhabited the woodlands, grasslands, and semi-arid regions of South America. Hunting in small packs, the animal likely hunted larger herbivores, with the Argentinosaurus being a particular favorite due to its immense size. However, it is important to note that the Mapusaurus likely consumed a large array of smaller lizards, reptiles, and mammals when the occasion presented itself.

How Deadly Was the Mapusaurus?

The Mapusaurus was an incredibly dangerous species of dinosaur and was renowned for its tremendous size, strength, and power. Possessing a bite force of approximately 7,000 PSI (greatly exceeding the American Alligator’s bite force of 2,980 PSI), the animal was quite capable of injuring (and killing) nearly any opponent in the wild. Due to their tremendous size, the Mapusaurus was also afforded a great deal of strength, allowing them to overpower smaller (and sometimes larger) dinosaurs with ease. Combined with their high top-speed (of 30 miles per hour), the dinosaur could quickly overwhelm would-be aggressors before they were able to mount a formidable defense. For these reasons, the Mapusaurus was an easy choice for our current list, as they were truly one of the world’s deadliest (and most fearsome) species of dinosaur to have ever existed.

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Allosaurus.

Allosaurus.

8. Allosaurus

  • Average Size: 16.5-feet (Height); 28-feet (Length)
  • Average Weight: 3,100 to 4,400 Pounds
  • Temporal Range: Late Jurassic (155 to 145 Million Years Ago)

The ferocious Allosaurus was a carnosaurian theropod that lived during the Late Jurassic epoch. Classified as a bipedal predator by researchers, the Allosaurus is believed to have resided in both North America and portions of Western Europe due to the large number of fossilized remains that have been discovered in these areas (as of 2022). Characterized as an apex predator during its time, the Allosaurus was an incredibly large dinosaur that was known to reach upwards of 16.5-feet in height, and grow upwards of 28-feet in length. Additionally, most specimens are believed to have reached an astounding 3,100 to 4,400 pounds at maturity. The animal can be easily identified by its similarity to the T-Rex, as it maintained a large and narrow head, long (and muscular) tail, two powerful hindlimbs, as well as a pair of three-fingered arms that were incredibly short.

From within its natural habitat, the Allosaurus was a terrestrial dinosaur who actively hunted in packs with others of its kind. Primary food for this species included large herbivorous dinosaurs, including ornithopods, stegosaurids, as well as various sauropods. However, recent excavations have shown that the Allosaurus may have also hunted other predators in the wild, including members of its own species (indicating a proclivity towards cannibalistic behavior).

How Deadly Was the Allosaurus?

The Allosaurus was an incredibly deadly animal renowned for both its immense power and strength. Classified by researchers as an extremely fierce and aggressive predator in the wild, the Allosaurus possessed well-muscled arms and legs, and approximately 32 serrated teeth that could be used for offensive and defensive purposes. Likewise, their skull was incredibly strong, and could be used like a “hatchet” against opponents by keeping their mouth open during attacks. Through a swinging motion of their head, this open-mouth strategy allowed the Allosaurus to slash its victims, inflicting massive amounts of damage and blood-loss. Combined with their bite force of approximately 1,500 PSI (which placed it alongside modern-day wolves in terms of strength), as well as their double-hinged jaw (that allowed them to open their mouth incredibly wide), the Allosaurus was truly one of the most feared dinosaurs of its time.

Saurophaganax.

Saurophaganax.

7. Saurophaganax

  • Average Size: 13-feet (Height); 34 to 43-feet (Length)
  • Average Weight: 6,600 to 9,900 Pounds
  • Temporal Range: Late Jurassic (151 Million Years Ago)

The deadly Saurophaganax (which translates to “Lord of Lizard-Eaters”) was an incredibly large allosaurid dinosaur that existed during the Late Jurassic epoch. Classified as a bipedal predator (similar to that of the Allosaurus), the Saurophaganax was first discovered in 1931 by John Willis Stovall. Living predominantly in North America, this species of dinosaur was renowned for its large size, as it commonly reached upwards of 13-feet in height, with an overall length of 34 to 43-feet at maturity. Likewise, average weight for this massive predator was believed to have been in the vicinity of 6,600 to 9,900 pounds. They could be easily identified by their elongated skulls, large hindlegs, and muscular tails that helped them to maintain a sense of balance while moving (or jumping).

From within their natural habitat in the wild, most Saurophaganax dinosaurs are believed to have resided primarily in woodland areas where prey was both abundant and plentiful. Although very little is currently understood about their prey and hunting practices, most researchers agree that the Saurophaganax likely hunted larger sauropods such as the Amphicoelias, Apatosaurus, as well as the massive Diplodocus. Recent evidence, however, has suggested that this species may have exhibited a number of raptor-like qualities, in that it could have been a scavenger as well. More information is necessary though, as this behavioral trait remains purely theoretical at this time.

How Deadly Was the Saurophaganax?

The Saurophaganax was an extremely dangerous dinosaur during the Jurassic era, and one of the deadliest species to have ever existed on our planet. Similar to the Allosaurus in its basic characteristics, the animal possessed well-muscled arms and legs, along with powerful claws that could be utilized for slashing and tearing their victims apart. Likewise, they were incredibly large animals, reaching almost 9,900 pounds at maturity. This, in turn, allowed the Saurophaganax to easily overwhelm their opponents through sheer strength and size. Combined with their large and serrated teeth, and a bite force of over 6,000 pounds in pressure, the Saurophaganax was a clear choice for our list, as few dinosaurs are capable of matching its overall power, size, and ferocity.

Giganotosaurus.

Giganotosaurus.

6. Giganotosaurus

  • Average Size: 16.6 to 18.3-feet (Height); 39 to 43-feet (Length)
  • Average Weight: 9,300 to 30,000 Pounds
  • Temporal Range: Late Cretaceous Period (99.6 to 97 Million Years Ago)

The supermassive Giganotosaurus (which means “Giant Southern Lizard”) was a theropod dinosaur that existed during the Late Cretaceous Period. First discovered in 1993 near the Candeleros Formation of Patagonia, the Giganotosaurus is believed to have been one of the largest terrestrial carnivores to have ever existed on Earth, and resided primarily in South America. On average, the dinosaur is believed to have reached an incredibly 16.6 to 18.3-feet in height, with an overall length of nearly 39 to 43-feet at maturity. Corresponding to these figures is a staggering weight range of 9,300 to 30,000 pounds at full maturity. The Giganotosaurus could be easily identified by its bipedal movement (similar to that of the Tyrannosaurus Rex), long and narrow skull, as well as its powerful hindlegs, short arms, and powerful tail.

Spending much of its time near Argentina, the Giganotosaurus is believed to have resided predominantly in plains and woodlands where it could actively hunt a number of prey. From here, most scholars believed that the animal fed primarily on large herbivorous dinosaurs. These included the massive Argentinosaurus, Andesaurus, as well as Limaysaurus, and Nopcsaspondylus (to name only a few). As an apex predator, it is theorized that the Giganotosaurus faced no real threat in the wild, with the exception of its own kind.

How Deadly Was the Giganotosaurus?

The Giganotosaurus was an extremely deadly dinosaur during the Late Cretaceous Period, and was renowned for its tremendous size and power. Although fossil records are limited, scientists have noted that this particular species was well-muscled in both its arms and legs, and possessed three sharp claws that were capable of slashing (or tearing) their victims apart with ease. Likewise, their teeth were large and serrated, with some of them reaching upwards of eight inches in length. This, in turn, provided them with the ability to bite and kill an animal within seconds, as their bite force is believed to have exceeded 8,000 pounds of pressure.

Further augmenting these basic offensive (and defensive) abilities was the Giganotosaurus’ tremendous speed, as the animal was capable of reaching a maximum speed of 31 miles per hour. This, in turn, provided the animal with a considerable advantage over slower-moving prey (and predators), as the Giganotosaurus was able to quickly and effectively overcome them before a formidable defense could be mounted. When combined with their sheer size and power, it is not difficult to see why this species was one of the most dangerous carnivores to have ever existed on the planet.

Majungasaurus.

Majungasaurus.

5. Majungasaurus

  • Average Size: 6-feet (Height); 23 to 26.2-feet (Length)
  • Average Weight: 2,400 Pounds
  • Temporal Range: Late Cretaceous Period (70 to 66 Million Years Ago)

The deadly Majungasaurus (which means “Mahajanga Lizard”) was a species of abelisaurid theropod dinosaur that lived during the Late Cretaceous Period. Endemic to modern-day Madagascar, the Majungasaurus was a bipedal predator, and one of the last known non-avian dinosaurs to go extinct. Maintaining a similar (but far smaller) frame to the Tyrannosaurus Rex, the Majungasaurus was renowned for its short stature and incredible length. On average, typical specimens reached approximately 6-feet in height, with an overall length of nearly 23 to 26.2-feet. Corresponding to these figures was an average weight of 2,400 pounds at maturity. The animal could be easily identified by its wide skull, short snout, and well-muscled hindlimbs. Likewise, a pronounced bone and single horn is believed to have adorned the top of its snout.

From within its natural habitat, the Majungasaurus was believed to have inhabited coastal plain regions; in particular, the sandy regions near various river channels. However, a number of scholars have posited that the animal may have also lived in the region’s numerous tropical forests and woodlands where prey would have been more abundant. Typical food sources for the Majungasaurus included the area’s various sauropods (such as the Rapetosaurus). Recent evidence also suggests that this species may have exhibited cannibalistic tendencies as well, making it one of the few dinosaurs known to exhibit such behavior. Regarding predation, few (if any) natural predators are currently known for the Majungasaurus as it is believed that the animal was an apex predator within its ecosystem.

How Deadly Was the Majungasaurus?

The Majungasaurus was an exceptionally dangerous species renowned for its tremendous strength and power in regard to other dinosaurs. Possessing a well-muscled body structure, the animal was more than capable of subduing large prey, despite its relatively short and lightweight characteristics. Likewise, the animal possessed a remarkable bite force in excess of 6,700 PSI, exceeding that of the modern-day saltwater crocodile with a bite of 3,700 PSI. This latter feature was perhaps its most important weapon, as fossilized records indicate that the animal would routinely bite and hold on to its victims, gnawing their bodies until a kill-stroke could be performed. Combined with its curved teeth (which aided in cutting and piercing), the Majungasaurus was an incredibly deadly animal worthy of inclusion on our current list.

Carcharodontosaurus.

Carcharodontosaurus.

4. Carcharodontosaurus

  • Average Size: 13-feet (Height); 43-feet (Length)
  • Average Weight: 13,000 to 33,000 Pounds
  • Temporal Range: Late Cretaceous Period (100 to 94 Million Years Ago)

The Carcharodontosaurus (not to be confused with the Carcharodon) was a species of large carcharodontosaurid theropod dinosaur that lived during Late Cretaceous Period. Endemic to modern-day North Africa, the Carcharodontosaurus was among the largest carnivores to have ever existed on Earth. On average, current fossil records indicate that the animal reached an average height of approximately 13-feet, with an overall length of nearly 43-feet. In terms of weight, the Carcharodontosaurus was believed to weigh an astounding 13,000 to 33,000 pounds at maturity. They could be easily identified by their massive skulls (reaching 5.2-feet in length), large jaws, as well as their well-muscled bodies, and enormous tail. Similar to the Tyrannosaurus Rex, the animal was also known to possess two short arms which were remarkably strong and powerful.

From within North Africa, the Carcharodontosaurus is believed to have inhabited regions near rivers and lakes where water supplies and food were plentiful. From here, the animal is believed to have consumed a number of herbivores, including ornithischians, spinosaurids, as well as sauropods. Carcharodontosaurus also probably engaged in scavenger-like behavior, eating as much as possible when the occasion presented itself. To date, no known predators existed for this species as they were believed to be an apex predator in their ecosystem.

How Deadly Was the Carcharodontosaurus?

The Carcharodontosaurus was an incredibly large and powerful dinosaur capable of subduing nearly any sort of prey (or enemy) that it was presented with. This was due, in part, to the animal’s massive size and weight, which allowed it to quickly overpower its victims with sheer strength alone. For example, scholars estimate that the Carcharodontosaurus was able to lift animals weighing nearly 935 pounds with its jaws and neck muscles alone. In conjunction with this extreme power was the animal’s large and serrated teeth that grew upwards of 8-inches in length. On average, it is estimated that the animal was capable of exerting upwards of 5,300 PSI of pressure in its bite force; thus, allowing it to bite through nearly any bodily structure with ease. Combined with its three sharp claws that adorned each arm, the Carcharodontosaurus was an incredibly deadly dinosaur, and one of the most dangerous animals to have ever existed.

Spinosaurus.

Spinosaurus.

3. Spinosaurus

  • Average Size: 18-feet (Height); 46 to 59-feet (Length)
  • Average Weight: 31,000 to 46,000 Pounds
  • Temporal Range: Late Cretaceous Period (99 to 93.5 Million Years Ago)

The large and deadly Spinosaurus (which means “Spine Lizard”) was a species of spinosaurid dinosaur that lived during the Late Cretaceous Period. Endemic to North Africa, the species was first discovered in 1912 by German paleontologist, Ernst Stromer. Classified as the largest terrestrial carnivore in history, the Spinosaurus was known to reach an incredible height of 18-feet, with an overall length of 46 to 59-feet at maturity. In terms of weight, most scholars believe that the dinosaur was capable of reaching upwards of 31,000 to 46,000 pounds. The Spinosaurus could be easily identified by its long and narrow skull which resembled that of a modern crocodile. Likewise, they were renowned for their long and robust forelimbs, unique neural spine (which stretched upwards of 5.4-feet), as well as their well-muscled bodies, and long tails.

From within their natural habitat, the Spinosaurus was classified as both a terrestrial and aquatic animal that spent equal amounts of time on land and in the water (again, similar to the modern-day crocodile). From here, the animal is believed to have consumed large numbers of fish and water-based creatures. However, fossilized remains have indicated that Spinosaurus also hunted terrestrial prey, including the Iguanodon, Pterosaur, and other large animals. There is also evidence to suggest that the Spinosaurus was a scavenger, as it was likely an opportunistic predator that ate whenever an occasion presented itself. In regard to predation, the animal is commonly classified as an apex predator as it faced no known enemies in the wild (due to its size and strength).

How Deadly Was the Spinosaurus?

As the largest terrestrial carnivore to have ever existed, the Spinosaurus was an incredibly deadly animal renowned for its immense power, speed, and strength (on both land and in the water). As such, the animal was well-suited for taking down both small and large prey, as their body size and strength (alone) was sufficient to subdue the majority of its opponents with ease. Possessing approximately 64 teeth within its narrow snout, the Spinosaurus was also capable of delivering flesh-piercing bites due to the conical and needle-like design of their teeth structure. This was augmented tremendously by the Spinosaurus’s bite force, which commonly exceeded 4,200 PSI per bite. When combined with their flexible tail (which could be used for slapping) and powerful claws, the Spinosaurus was well-equipped to deliver fatal blows to nearly any dinosaur that it crossed paths with. For these reasons, they were truly one of the deadliest dinosaurs to have ever existed.

Utahraptor.

Utahraptor.

2. Utahraptor

  • Average Size: 4.9-feet (Height); 16 to 23-feet (Length)
  • Average Weight: 1,500 Pounds
  • Temporal Range: Early Cretaceous Period (139 to 134.6 Million Years Ago)

The infamous Utahraptor was a large dromaeosaurid dinosaur that lived during the Early Cretaceous Period. Endemic to North America, the Utahraptor was first discovered by Jim Jenson in 1975 around the Dalton Wells Quarry of East Utah (hence its name). Classified as a bipedal predator, the animal commonly reached heights of 4.9-feet, with an astounding length of 16 to 23-feet at maturity. In terms of weight, the Utahraptor is believed to have weighed 1,500 to 2,000 pounds (making it comparable to the modern-day polar bear in regard to mass). The dinosaur could be easily identified by its long and narrow skull, thin and muscular tail, powerful hindlimbs, as well as their curved claws that resemble that of the Velociraptor. Recent evidence also suggests that the Utahraptor may have possessed feathers across its body similar to modern-day birds; however, this claim continues to be a highly-contentious subject among scholars.

From within their natural habitat, the Utahraptor is believed to have inhabited semi-arid environments near floodplains, riverine forests, and open woodlands. Hunting in packs, the animal commonly engaged in scavenger-like behavior, consuming whatever food it came across (dead or alive). Characterized as a ferocious hunter, the animal is also believed to have actively engaged large sauropods, as well as the ankylosaurs that roamed North America. Due to its size, strength, and remarkable intelligence, no known predators are believed to have existed for the Utahraptor, as they are commonly viewed as apex predators by the scholarly community.

How Deadly Was the Utahraptor?

The Utahraptor was an insanely deadly and dangerous dinosaur during the Early Cretaceous Period due to its remarkable speed and power. One of its most potent features was the animal’s incredible intelligence. Operating within large packs, Utahraptors possessed a strategic mindset, allowing them to actively herd and set traps for their victims. Once caught, the animal was capable of unleashing a series of devastating attacks through both bites and quick slashes. Similar to the Velociraptor, each Utahraptor possessed a large sickle-like claw that measured upward of 9-inches in length. These devices were incredibly sharp, and could be utilized for the purpose of inflicting deep (and fatal) wounds. Likewise, the animal also possessed a large number of razor-sharp (and serrated) teeth that could easily tear through flesh due to their bite force of approximately 600 to 950 PSI. When combined with their tremendous speed, agility, and aggressive nature, it is not difficult to see why the Utahraptor was one of the deadliest dinosaurs to have inhabited our planet.

Tyrannosaurus Rex.

Tyrannosaurus Rex.

1. Tyrannosaurus Rex

  • Average Size: 12-feet (Height); 40-feet (Length)
  • Average Weight: 11,000 to 19,000 Pounds
  • Temporal Range: Late Cretaceous Period (68 to 66 Million Years Ago)

Topping our list of the world’s deadliest dinosaurs is the infamous Tyrannosaurus Rex. Commonly referred to as the “King of the Dinosaurs,” T-Rex was a large theropod dinosaur that lived during the Late Cretaceous Period. Endemic to the western portions of North America, the animal was classified as a bipedal carnivore, and was one of the last non-avian dinosaurs to exist before the events of the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction took place. Renowned for their tremendous size and strength, the Tyrannosaurus Rex was known to reach an incredible 12-feet in height, and approximately 40-feet in its overall length. In terms of weight, the animal commonly weighed between 11,000 to 19,000 pounds at maturity. They could be easily identified due to their massive skulls, long teeth, well-muscled hindlimbs, short forelimbs, as well as their long and muscular tails.

From within their natural habitat, the Tyrannosaurus Rex is believed to have inhabited forested regions near rivers, as well as more open areas where prey was more abundant. Scholars are quick to point out, however, that fossilized records point to other natural habitats as well, including: coastal swamps, and semi-tropical regions where humidity levels were high. In regard to diet, the T-Rex was an apex predator that was afforded a wide selection of prey. Common food sources included Triceratops, Edmontosaurus, Hadrosaur, as well as various large herbivores. Many scholars also believe that the T-Rex was a scavenger, of sorts, and likely stole meals from other predators when the occasion presented itself.

How Deadly Was the Tyrannosaurus Rex?

The Tyrannosaurus Rex was an insanely dangerous and deadly dinosaur due to its remarkable strength, size, and power. As with many of the dinosaurs on this list, the T-Rex’s size played a large part in its overall hunting (and killing) abilities, as the animal was capable of overwhelming the majority of its victims with sheer power and strength alone. Once subdued, the T-Rex could then inflict powerful bites on its victims, resulting in tremendous blood-loss and irreparable harm to their bodily structures. In fact, the T-Rex is regularly cited as having the most powerful bite force of any land-based animal in history. On average, scholars believe that they were able to exert a bite force in excess of 12,800 pounds of pressure, allowing them to tear threw skin and bones with ease. When combined with their bloodlust and ferocious spirit, it is not difficult to see why the Tyrannosaurus Rex was the deadliest and most dangerous dinosaur of all time; a feat that will likely remain undisputed for the foreseeable future.

Works Cited

Articles/Books:

  • “Dinopedia.” The Dinosaur Wiki.” Accessed: 8 March 2022. Web.
  • Padian, K. “Tyrannosaurus Rex.” Encylopedia Brittanica. 25 August 2016. Web.
  • Slawson, Larry. “The Tyrannosaurus Rex: Quick Facts.” OwlCation. 2019.
  • Slawson, Larry. “The Velociraptor: Quick Facts.” OwlCation. 2020.
  • “Utahraptor.” Natural History Museum of Utah. Accessed: 7 March 2022. Web.
  • “Velociraptor.” Natural History Museum. Accessed: 8 March 2022. Web.

Images/Photographs:

  • Pixabay.
  • Wikimedia Commons.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2022 Larry Slawson

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