The Top 10 Most Venomous Snakes in Australia

Updated on July 20, 2020
Larry Slawson profile image

Larry Slawson received his Master's Degree in 2018. He has a keen interest in reptiles, insects, and arachnids.

From the red-bellied snake to the western brown, this article examines the 10 deadliest snakes on the Australian continent.
From the red-bellied snake to the western brown, this article examines the 10 deadliest snakes on the Australian continent.

10 of Australia's Deadliest Snakes

Throughout Australia, there exists a large number of venomous snakes capable of inflicting serious harm (or death) to humans. From the red-bellied black snake to the eastern brown, these snakes are well-known for their potent venom and aggressive behavior, making them extremely dangerous to humans and other animals.

This article examines the 10 deadliest snakes known to exist on the Australian continent. It provides an analysis of each snake’s venom toxicity and potential for causing human fatalities.

Selection Criteria

In selecting each of the snakes outlined below, a number of basic assumptions are necessary. First and foremost, since most venomous snake bites are capable of being controlled by anti-venom, the author is forced to analyze the “deadliness” of each snake with a presumptive mindset.

As a result, the snakes listed below are ranked according to their potential for causing human death when anti-venom and medical care are unavailable to the victim. To accomplish this, the average time of death following a bite and the average potency of each snake’s bite are taken into consideration.

Although this leaves room for potential flaws, the author believes these criteria offer the best available parameters for ranking Australia’s 10 deadliest snakes.

The 10 Deadliest and Most Dangerous Snakes in Australia

10. Red-Bellied Black Snake
9. Lowlands Copperhead
8. King Brown Snake
7. Western Brown Snake
6. Death Adder
5. Tiger Snake
4. Coastal Taipan
3. Eastern Brown
2. Belcher’s Sea Snake
1. Inland Taipan

Notice how the red-bellied black snake raises (and flattens) its head in a manner similar to the cobra.
Notice how the red-bellied black snake raises (and flattens) its head in a manner similar to the cobra. | Source

10. Red-Bellied Black Snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus)

  • Average Size: 4.1 feet (1.25 meters)
  • Geographical Range: East coast of Australia, Blue Mountains, Canberra, Sydney, Brisbane, Melbourne, Cairns, and the Macquarie Marshes
  • Conservation Status: Least concern (population stable)

The red-bellied black snake is a highly venomous species known to inhabit the eastern stretches of the Australian coast. As its name implies, the snake possesses a dark black body that is accentuated by bright red (occasionally orange) flanks and a pinkish-red underbelly.

Commonly found in marshes, woodlands, and forests, the snake primarily forages for food in shallow bodies of water where it hunts frogs, small fish, rodents, and other reptiles. Due to recent expansions of Australia’s population, the red-bellied black snake is one of the most commonly encountered species of snake in the country. Fortunately, it is not considered an aggressive species and typically avoids contact with humans whenever possible.

Did You Know?

When threatened, the red-bellied black snake raises its head above the ground while simultaneously flattening its head (similar to the cobra). This makes the snake appear larger and more fierce towards predators.

Red-Bellied Black Snake Bite Symptoms and Treatment

The red-bellied black snake’s venom contains a potent mixture of neurotoxins and myotoxins that are known to produce a coagulant and haemolytic effect on their victim’s blood. As a result, bites from this snake are extremely painful as the toxins rapidly take effect upon entering the bloodstream. Although rarely fatal (due to an abundance of highly-effective anti-venoms), bites are still considered extremely dangerous and require immediate hospitalization.

Symptoms of a red-bellied black snake bite include swelling, excessive bleeding, and necrosis of the wound site. Symptoms indicating systemic envenomation by the snake include vomiting, diarrhea, migraines, abdominal pains, and extreme sweating.

Generally speaking, bites are rarely fatal but can result in long-term issues. These can include a permanent loss of smell (known as anosmia), muscle pain, and weakness throughout the body. Occasionally, amputations are also necessary around the bite area to counteract localized reactions to the snake’s venom.

Despite its name, the lowlands copperhead should not be confused with the America-based snake.
Despite its name, the lowlands copperhead should not be confused with the America-based snake. | Source

9. Lowlands Copperhead (Austrelaps superbus)

  • Average Size: 3 to 4.5 feet (1 to 1.5 meters)
  • Geographical Range: Southeastern Australia and Tasmania
  • Conservation Status: Least concern (population stable)

The lowlands copperhead is a highly venomous species of snake found in Southeastern Australia and Tasmania. Considered a member of the Elapidae family (which includes cobras), the lowland copperhead is a relatively large snake, growing upwards of 4.5 feet.

As its name implies, the snake generally maintains a brown or yellowish complexion (similar to copper). However, red, black, and grey varieties of this species have also been known to occur. And while commonly referred to as the “copperhead,” it is important to note that this species is distinct from and unrelated to the American snake of the same name.

Similar to the red-bellied black snake, the lowland copperhead is commonly found near bodies of water, as the animal prefers low vegetation (such as marshes and swamplands). From here, the snake commonly hunts for frogs, lizards, and smaller snakes (including its own species).

Did You Know?

When provoked, the lowland copperhead is known to flatten its body and hiss loudly to scare away humans and other animals. These snakes are also capable of raising their heads off the ground in a manner similar to cobras.

Lowlands Copperhead Bite Symptoms and Treatment

The lowlands copperhead possesses an extremely potent venom that is comprised of powerful postsynaptic neurotoxins, hemotoxins, and cytotoxins. As a result, a single bite is capable of killing an adult human with ease. Following a bite, their venom is known to actively attack the nervous system of their victim. This, in turn, results in severe headaches, dizziness, and convulsions (in severe cases). Non-specific effects also include abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and localized pain in the bite area.

Although the snake is generally described as “shy” around humans, it will actively defend itself when provoked (tas.gov.au). Fortunately, only a dozen bites have been recorded from the lowland copperhead with only one fatality (giving the snake an eight percent fatality rate among known bites).

Treatment with antivenom is the usual course of treatment for lowland copperhead bites, along with palliative care and intravenous fluids. Despite its low mortality rate, however, toxicology reports indicate that untreated cases are capable of being lethal 20 to 40 percent of the time, making this an incredibly dangerous snake that should be avoided whenever possible (toxinology.com).

The Highly Venomous King Brown Snake
The Highly Venomous King Brown Snake | Source

8. King Brown Snake (Pseudechis australis)

  • Average Size: 6.6 to 8.2 feet (2 to 2.5 meters)
  • Geographical Range: All areas of Australia with the exceptions of Victoria and Tasmania
  • Conservation Status: Least concern (population stable)

The king brown snake is a highly venomous species from the Elapidae family. Also referred to as the “mulga snake,” the king brown is considered Australia’s longest venomous snake, reaching upwards of 8.2 feet (2.5 meters) at maturity. King browns are found throughout most of the Australian continent with the exception of Victoria and Tasmania. In more recent years, however, sightings of the snake have become quite rare in Queensland, as human encroachment has resulted in diminished populations.

In regard to habitat, the king brown is found predominantly in woodlands, grasslands, and regions with low vegetation. Similar to the red-bellied black snake, the king brown tends to favor bodies of water where it can actively hunt a variety of prey. This includes smaller snakes, lizards, rodents, birds, and various amphibians (such as frogs).

Did You Know?

Contrary to many snake species, the king brown is capable of living an astounding 20 to 30 years. This is a relatively common phenomenon, as the king brown possesses few natural predators in the wild.

King Brown Bite Symptoms and Treatment

King browns are known for their aggressive behavior and have one of the highest venom outputs of any snake in the world. This makes them an incredibly deadly and dangerous snake to humans and other animals. And while bites are rarely fatal (due to medical advances in anti-venom), the king brown accounted for approximately four percent of all snake bites in Australia between 2005 and 2015. While many of these victims were snake handlers, research has shown that many king brown bites occur without provocation (with some victims being attacked while sleeping).

As part of their aggressive behavior, king browns are known to strike their victims repeatedly and will often “chew” in order to deliver maximum venom output. The primary component of their venom is powerful hemotoxins and mycotoxins that attack the blood, muscular-skeletal system, as well as the kidneys of an individual. Following envenomation, nausea, abdominal pain, and vomiting are common, along with diarrhea, sweating, and localized swelling around the wound. Once the venom’s hemotoxins enter the bloodstream, clotting often develops rapidly leading to a fall in red blood cells. Myotoxicity also begins rapidly and includes severe muscle pain and weakness (due to the elevation of creatine in the blood).

Bites from a king brown are considered a medical emergency, and require prompt treatment to prevent long-term complications (or death). During treatment, tetanus vaccines are typically given alongside black snake anti-venom. Victims are then monitored for several days and are provided intravenous fluids to maintain hydration and strength.

While most individuals make full recoveries, long-term medical problems are quite common with king brown bites. The most common issues involve muscle damage and weakness that usually resolve several weeks later. In cases of severe envenomation, however, these issues may become permanent.

The deadly Western Brown Snake
The deadly Western Brown Snake | Source

7. Western Brown Snake (Pseudonaja nuchalis)

  • Average Size: 5.8 feet (1.8 meters)
  • Geographical Range: Northern Territory, Queensland, Western Australia, and Victoria
  • Conservation Status: Unknown (insufficient data)

The western brown snake (also referred to as the gwardar) is a species of highly venomous snake from the Elapidae family. Western browns are one of the fastest snake species on the continent and can be easily identified by their orangish-black appearance, along with their cream-colored (orangish-pink) underbelly. Despite the implication of their name, western browns have a wide distribution and can be found throughout the entirety of the Australian continent.

In regard to habitat, the western brown tends to favor drier conditions. As such, they are commonly found living in grasslands and woodlands (though some have been found along coastal regions as well). And while this snake is not classified as an arboreal species, it isn’t uncommon to spot a western brown in a tree or shrub. Within its natural habitat, the snake tends to prey on smaller mammals and reptiles, with lizards and mice being their primary meals.

Did You Know?

The name “gwardar” is aboriginal for “go the long way around.” This is a fitting name, as individuals should take great care when coming into contact with the western brown snake.

Western Brown Bite Symptoms and Treatment

While generally shy around humans, the western brown is well-known for its extreme aggression when provoked. This tendency combined with its potent venom makes the western brown is an extremely dangerous snake to humans that cross their paths. Their venom is comprised of neurotoxins, nephrotoxins, and procoagulants.

And while bites are usually painless (due to the snake’s small fangs), symptoms of envenomation often begin rapidly. These symptoms include headache, nausea, vomiting, and severe abdominal pain. As the venom continues to progress throughout the bloodstream, coagulation of the blood is common, along with severe damage to the kidneys.

Bite victims should seek immediate medical treatment to avoid serious complications or death. A wide array of anti-venoms are available to individuals but must be administered rapidly to prevent further issues from developing. In conjunction with anti-venom, treatment usually includes palliative care, which aims to alleviate as much pain as possible.

The Common Death Adder
The Common Death Adder | Source

6. Death Adder (Acanthophis antarcticus)

  • Average Size: 1.3 to 3.3 feet
  • Geographical Range: Eastern and Southern Australia, Queensland, New South Wales, and Victoria
  • Conservation Status: Least concern (population stable)

The death adder (also referred to as the “common death adder”) is a species of highly venomous snake from the Elapidae family. Currently considered one of the deadliest snakes in the world, the death adder is aptly named and can be seen throughout much of eastern and southern Australia.

The snake is relatively small (reaching upwards of 3.3 feet), and can be easily identified by to its broad, triangular-shaped head, as well as its thick body, which is typically black with red, brown, and black bands.

In regard to habitat, the death adder tends to favor dry conditions and can often be found in forests, grasslads, and woodlands. These regions provide the snake with plenty of camouflage, allowing them to set up ambushes for potential prey with ease. Prey usually includes small mammals (such as mice) and birds. Unlike many of the snakes on this list, the death adder is not particularly aggressive and will lie in wait for several days to catch a meal.

Did You Know?

The death adder possesses a small “lure” at the end of its tail that strongly resembles a worm. The snake uses this device to encourage smaller animals to approach, allowing it to quickly ambush its unsuspecting prey.

Death Adder Bite Symptoms and Treatment

As one of the world’s deadliest snakes, the death adder contains a potent venom that is comprised of highly-toxic neurotoxins. Symptoms begin rapidly following envenomation and include drooping eyelids, extreme nausea, vomiting, and difficulty breathing.

As the venom progresses, difficulties with speech are common (as the neurotoxins begin to affect the central nervous system), along with paralysis of the respiratory system in the final stages. Without medical treatment, deaths usually occur within six hours of the bite, making the death adder one of Australia’s deadliest snakes.

Since approximately 60 percent of death adder bites result in severe envenomation, rapid medical treatment is needed for survival. Standard treatment involves pressure immobilization of the snake bite along with anti-venom therapy.

As with most snake bites, palliative care and intravenous fluids are also common treatments used in conjunction with anti-venom, as they help to alleviate pain and keep the victim hydrated.

The Extremely Dangerous Tiger Snake
The Extremely Dangerous Tiger Snake | Source

5. Tiger Snake (Notechis scutatus)

  • Average Size: 3.94 feet (1.2 meters)
  • Geographical Range: Coastal regions of western and southern Australia
  • Conservation Status: Least concern (population stable)

The tiger snake is a species of highly venomous snake from the Elapidae family. Considered one of the most venomous snake species in Australia, the tiger snake is also regarded as one of the deadliest animals in the world due to its potent venom and aggressive behavior.

Tiger snakes are relatively small (reaching an average length of only 3.94 feet at maturity), and can be easily identified by their olive-yellow (or orange and black) bodies and yellowish-orange underbellies.

In regard to habitat, the tiger snake is predominantly found along the coastal regions of western and southern Australia. This includes Tasmania, Victoria, and New South Wales. As with many snakes, this species is particularly fond of wetlands and areas supported by creeks or river systems. Within these areas, potential prey is abundant and capable of supporting tiger snake populations with ease. Common prey often includes small mammals (such as rodents), other snakes, lizards, and frogs.

Tiger Snake Bite Symptoms and Treatment

When threatened, the tiger snake is an extremely formidable opponent with a bite capable of subduing nearly any opposition. Tiger snake venom is comprised of an array of neurotoxins, haemolysins, coagulants, and myotoxins that are extremely potent.

After envenomation, symptoms are known to begin rapidly with localized pain and numbness being among the first complaints from victims. Sweating and breathing problems follow, with complete respiratory failure occurring soon after. Treatment generally involves pressure immobilization to inhibit the flow of venom throughout the body’s lymphatic system, along with the administration of anti-venom.

Tiger snakes were responsible for nearly 17 percent of all snake bites in Australia between the years 2005 and 2015. Of nearly 119 attacks during this period, four individuals died from envenomation, as they were unable to receive medical treatment in time.

In a toxicology study performed by the University of Adelaide, it was found that mortality rates for the tiger snake are approximately 40 to 60 percent for victims unable to receive medical treatment (anti-venom) in time. For these reasons, the tiger snake is easily one of the deadliest snakes in Australia (and the world).

The deadly Coastal Taipan
The deadly Coastal Taipan | Source

4. Coastal Taipan (Oxyuranus scutellatus)

  • Average Size: 3.9 to 6.6 feet (1.2 to 2.0 meters)
  • Geographical Range: Coastal regions of northern and eastern Australia
  • Conservation Status: Unknown (insufficient data)

The coastal taipan is a species of highly venomous snake from the Elapidae family. Closely related to the deadly Inland taipan, coastal taipans are an incredibly dangerous species of snake due to their highly potent venom. As a diurnal species, the snake is most active in the morning period, and can be easily identified due to its longer length, slender build, and narrow head.

Although colors for this species vary (according to the season), coastal taipans are predominantly reddish-brown or olive in coloration and possess a yellowish-white underbelly.

As their name implies, the Coastal Taipan is found predominantly along the coastal regions of Northern and Eastern Australia (including the island of New Guinea). However, it is not uncommon to spot these snakes hundreds of miles inland. In general, the Coastal Taipan typically prefers warmer and wetter (tropical) locales. For this reason, they are often found around wetlands and monsoon forests.

Sugarcane fields and woodlands are also favorites of this species as they offer an abundance of rodents that the snake can feed on regularly, as well as natural cover (such as animal burrows, logs, and various debris to conceal themselves under). Common prey includes rats, mice, small birds, and bandicoots.

You know, you can touch a stick of dynamite, but if you touch a venomous snake it'll turn around and bite you and kill you so fast it's not even funny.

— Steve Irwin

Coastal Taipan Bite Symptoms and Treatment

Coastal taipans are not known to be particularly aggressive and will usually retreat when danger is near. Nevertheless, these snakes are extremely dangerous to humans and will actively attack when provoked. Venom from the coastal taipan is comprised of a deadly neurotoxin known as taicatoxin, which directly attacks the body’s central nervous system and blood.

Upon envenomation, symptoms begin almost immediately with headache, nausea, vomiting, and convulsions being among the most common ailments. Within minutes, the deadly venom begins to attack the body’s muscles and internal organs (such as the kidneys), causing paralysis, myolysis, and severe internal bleeding.

Without rapid treatment, death typically occurs within two hours of a bite. However, in cases of severe envenomation, deaths have been reported in as little as 30 minutes.

Toxicology studies by the University of Adelaide have shown that fatality rates from coastal taipan bite are nearly 100 percent when left untreated. In fact, only one individual is known to have survived a coastal taipan bite without anti-venom in the last century. And while anti-venoms exist to counteract the species' venom’s deadly properties, lifelong complications (such as muscle and tissue damage) are extremely common.

The Highly Venomous Eastern Brown Snake
The Highly Venomous Eastern Brown Snake

3. Eastern Brown Snake (Pseudonaja textilis)

  • Average Size: 4.9 to 6.6 feet (1.5 to 2.0 meters)
  • Geographical Range: Eastern and central Australia
  • Conservation Status: Least concern (population stable)

The eastern brown (also known as the common brown snake) is a species of highly venomous snake from the Elapidae family. Considered the second-most venomous land snake in the world, the eastern brown is an incredibly dangerous animal and is capable of causing life-threatening injuries with nearly every bite.

Similar to the coastal taipan, the eastern brown is a diurnal species that is most active in the daylight hours. They can be easily identified due to their small fangs (approximately 2.8 millimeters), slender build, and rounded head. And while these snakes are typically brownish in coloration (as their name implies), some specimens have been described as orange, russet, or olive in their overall complexion.

Eastern browns are typically found along the east coast of Australia, with some populations occupying areas in the central territories of Queensland, New South Wales, and Victoria. In contrast to many of the snakes on this list, the eastern brown generally prefers drier terrain and is commonly found in woodlands, grasslands, and the dry eucalypt forests along Australia’s east coast.

They are also quite common in more open habitats (such as farmlands) and are seen often around houses (making them extremely dangerous to humans in these regions). This is due in part to the wide array of prey available in these environments, including small rats, mice, small birds, and eggs. Eastern browns are also known to consume smaller snakes when the occasion arises.

Did You Know?

The term "pseudonaja" is a Greek word and means “false cobra.” This is fitting for the eastern brown, as the snake tends to mimic the defensive measures of many cobra species.

Eastern Brown Bite Symptoms and Treatment

Bites from eastern browns are considered life-threatening and require immediate medical treatment to prevent long-term complications or death. Venom from the eastern brown is comprised of coagulants along with postsynaptic and presynaptic neurotoxins (including textilotoxin).

After envenomation, bite symptoms begin rapidly (usually within 15 minutes) and include rapid drops in blood pressure (hypotension) and severe bleeding. Severe headaches, nausea, vomiting, and excessive sweating are also common, along with abdominal pain and seizures. Due to the coagulant effects of the venom, clotting abnormalities are one of the final stages of the venom’s progression. This, in turn, results in severe injuries to the victim’s kidneys and heart with cardiac arrest following.

Mortality rates for the eastern brown are relatively low (approximately 10 to 20 percent). This is due to the fact that venom yields are relatively low for this snake, resulting in fewer fatalities. Nevertheless, eastern browns were responsible for approximately 41 percent of all snakebite victims in Australia between the years 2005 and 2015, with 15 deaths recorded. And while anti-venom is highly-effective against the snake’s bite (when administered quickly after envenomation), long-term complications (such as muscle and internal organ damage) are extremely common with this snake.

Pictured above is an underwater view of the Belcher's Sea Snake.
Pictured above is an underwater view of the Belcher's Sea Snake. | Source

2. Belcher’s Sea Snake (Hydrophis belcheri)

  • Average Size: 1.5 to 3.3 feet (0.45 to 1 meter)
  • Geographical Range: Indian Ocean and northern coast of Australia
  • Conservation Status: Unknown (insufficient data)

The Belcher’s sea snake is an extremely venomous species from the Elapidae family. Considered the most venomous sea snake in existence, the Belcher’s sea snake possesses a deadly bite capable of killing humans with ease. First discovered in the 1800s, the snake is relatively small in stature, reaching only about 3.3 feet (maximum).

Despite being extremely dangerous, the Belcher’s sea snake is generally described as timid and docile, as it rarely bites unless directly provoked. It can be easily identified due to its thin body, short head, and chrome-like coloration that is accentuated by a series of darkened bands.

Belcher’s sea snake is found predominantly in the warm waters of the Indian Ocean around the Gulf of Thailand, the Solomon Islands, and the northwest coast of Australia (around the North Territory and Queensland). As a sea snake, the animal feeds primarily on small fish and eel using ambush tactics to subdue its prey.

Did You Know?

The Belcher's sea snake is capable of holding its breath for nearly seven to eight hours before having to resurface for air.

Belcher’s Sea Snake Bite Symptoms and Treatment

Venom from the Belcher’s sea snake is incredibly potent and has the power to kill an individual in less than 30 minutes. It is believed that the snake’s venom is comprised of a powerful mixture of myotoxins and neurotoxins.

Following envenomation, symptoms begin rapidly and include dizziness, migraine headaches, nausea, extreme abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea. Within minutes, convulsions are also common along with complete paralysis. As the venom continues to attack the body, some individuals suffer from hysteria as well as uncontrollable bleeding. In its final stages, the venom causes a complete shutdown of the body’s kidneys and respiratory system leading to death.

Standard treatment for a Belcher’s sea snake bite includes palliative care along with the administering of anti-venom to combat the venom’s progression. However, due to the toxic nature of the snake’s venom, immediate medical attention is necessary for survival. Fortunately, bites are relatively rare with this species and generally occur when fishermen accidentally catch the animal in fishnets.

In addition, recent evidence suggests that the Belcher’s sea snake is capable of controlling its overall secretion of venom, and may only release venom in a quarter of its bites. In spite of this, the snake remains an incredibly deadly adversary in the animal kingdom and should be avoided at all costs.

The Inland Taipan: Australia's Deadliest and Most Venomous Land Snake
The Inland Taipan: Australia's Deadliest and Most Venomous Land Snake | Source

1. Inland Taipan (Oxyuranus microlepitdotus)

  • Average Size: 6.5 to 8.8 feet (1.9 to 2.68 meters)
  • Geographical Range: Queensland and southern Australia
  • Conservation Status: Least concern (population stable)

The inland taipan is an extremely venomous and deadly species from the Elapidae family of snakes. Although considered a calm and placid animal, experts generally agree that the inland taipan is the deadliest land-based snake in the world due to its highly toxic venom.

Inland taipans are relatively large, reaching 6.5 to 8.8 feet in some specimens. They can also be easily identified by their rounded snout, smooth chevron-scales, and slender body that takes on a variety of seasonal colors.

In regard to habitat, the inland taipan is found predominantly in the black soil plains of Queensland and South Australia. Generally speaking, the snake tends to prefer clay-like ground (which is common in these areas), as it provides excellent concealment against predators and the elements. This type of ground is crucial for the snake’s survival, as these areas possess little vegetation and ground cover. Operating from burrows and small holes, the inland taipan aggressively hunts a wide array of animals within its territory. These include rats, mice, and small birds.

Did You Know?

Due to the potent nature of the inland taipan's venom, a single bite from this snake is capable of killing 100 people within 30 minutes.

Inland Taipan Bite Symptoms and Treatment

Venom from the inland taipan is extremely potent and is comprised of multiple neurotoxins, myotoxins, nephrotoxins, and hemotoxins. When combined, these toxins work together to attack their victim’s central nervous system, blood, muscular-skeletal system, and internal organs.

Following envenomation, neurotoxins rapidly attack the nervous system causing convulsions and paralysis within minutes. As this occurs, the other components of the snake’s venom begin to attack the blood, resulting in poor circulation (from clotting), as well as extreme vomiting, migraine headaches, and dizziness. As the venom takes complete control of the body, complete respiratory paralysis and renal failure occur. Depending on the severity of the bite, death usually occurs in two to six hours, while severe envenomation can kill in as little as 30 minutes.

Taipan-specific anti-venoms are the primary line of defense against bites, along with pressure immobilization, intravenous fluids, and palliative care. However, due to the rapid onset of symptoms and the progression of the snake’s venom, immediate medical attention is necessary for survival.

In fact, it is generally accepted that bites from the inland taipan are 100 percent fatal with the absence of medical care. This is due to the fact that inland taipans tend to inject large amounts of venom into their victims through a series of multiple bites. And while anti-venoms certainly offer great protection against the snake’s potent venom, lifelong complications are common with inland taipan bites (in particular, heart, kidney, and muscle damage).

Eastern Small-Eyed Snake
Eastern Small-Eyed Snake | Source

Honorable Mention: Eastern Small-Eyed Snake (Cryptophis nigrescens)

  • Average Size: 3.2 feet (1 meter)
  • Geographical Range: Eastern Australia
  • Conservation Status: Least concern (population stable)

Although the eastern small-eyed snake failed to make the list for deadliest snakes in Australia, this species continues to be one of the most dangerous on the continent due to their potent venom.

To date, only one known fatality has resulted from a small-eyed snake bite due to its reclusive nature and nocturnal behavior. Nevertheless, it is a species that should be avoided at all costs.

If bitten by a snake, you should follow these medical guidelines immediately.
If bitten by a snake, you should follow these medical guidelines immediately.

Concluding Thoughts

In conclusion, a number of deadly snakes that occupy the Australian continent are capable of causing lifelong injuries or death to humans and other animals. From the red-bellied black snake to the deadly inland taipan, these fearsome snakes are truly worthy of our respect and admiration due to their natural beauty and potent bites. As most would agree, however, this respect should always be given at a safe distance, as the danger posed by these snakes is far too great to face.

Works Cited

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and does not substitute for diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, prescription, and/or dietary advice from a licensed health professional. Drugs, supplements, and natural remedies may have dangerous side effects. If pregnant or nursing, consult with a qualified provider on an individual basis. Seek immediate help if you are experiencing a medical emergency.

© 2020 Larry Slawson

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    • Pamela99 profile image

      Pamela Oglesby 

      4 weeks ago from Sunny Florida

      These snakes all looke deadly to me and I do not want to be near any of them. For some reason the Deadly Adder looked and sounded so scary. This is an interesting article. I have never been to Australia and probably won't get there but these snkes are sure something to watch out for.

    • Danny Fernandes profile image

      Danny 

      4 weeks ago from India

      Larry, I heard Australia has the world deadliest snakes. India, too has a few poisonous snakes.

      But Krait is very dangerous as it slithers during night.

    • Cheryl E Preston profile image

      Cheryl E Preston 

      4 weeks ago from Roanoke

      Please keep them in Australia.

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