Top Ten Interesting and Fun Facts About the Universe

Updated on July 26, 2018
stuff4kids profile image

Amanda is a retired educator with many years of experience teaching children of all ages and abilities in a wide range of contexts.

Facts About Our Universe
Facts About Our Universe | Source

1. The Universe

Scientists estimate that the universe contains up to 100 billion galaxies. Gravity groups the galaxies together in superclusters, separated by vast swathes of space.

A New Star Forming

A spectacular photo of a new star forming.
A spectacular photo of a new star forming. | Source

2. How the Universe Evolved

According to current research the universe began 13 billion years ago with a giant explosion known as the Big Bang. After 300,000 years the first particles of matter appeared. But it would take another 9.2 billion years before the first life forms evolved.

Distant Galaxies

A cluster of galaxies from NGC 300 images.  Their red color suggests they are equidistant  from each other.
A cluster of galaxies from NGC 300 images. Their red color suggests they are equidistant from each other. | Source

A Brief History of the Universe in Seven Steps

  1. 13 billion years ago the universe exploded into existence from a tiny concentration of matter and energy known as the singularity.
  2. Within three minutes of the Big Bang the centers of atoms, called atomic nuclei, formed from subatomic particles.
  3. After 300,000 years matter was evident and coalesced into particles which later formed the building blocks of galaxies, stars, planets, and life itself.
  4. 12 billion years ago the first galaxies came into existence. Light blazing from the stars within these galaxies illuminated the darkness of the early universe.
  5. 11 billion years ago a huge cloud of helium and hydrogen gases reacted to form the stars of our own galaxy, the Milky Way.
  6. 5 billion years ago our own special star, the sun, formed the solar system from rocks and ice attracted by its gravitational field.
  7. 3.8 billion years ago, on our planet Earth, which lies in the sweet spot neither too far from the sun nor to close, life evolved.

The Expanding Universe

An image of the universe expanding after the Big Bang
An image of the universe expanding after the Big Bang | Source

3. How Big Is the Universe?

As Douglas Adams pointed out in his famous science fiction comedy adventure, The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, the universe is very, very big! As far as we can see the universe expands over 26 billion light years. We define a light year as the distance which light can travel in the space of a single year. It’s about 9.5 billion kilometers or just under 6 billion miles.

The Universe Is Very Big

Cosmic dust, stars and galaxies in deep space
Cosmic dust, stars and galaxies in deep space | Source

4. What Are Galaxies?

Galaxies are vast superclusters of stars bound by gravitational energy. Our own star, the sun, is one of many billions of stars in the Milky Way. The Milky Way is a spiral galaxy, but other galaxies may take different forms.

  • Spiral galaxies

Spiral galaxies have a disc-like shape. At least two and often more curving arms of stars spin and twirl around the center.

Spiral Galaxies

Images of spiral galaxies taken by the Hubble Telescope
Images of spiral galaxies taken by the Hubble Telescope | Source
  • Barred spiral galaxies

Similar in form to spiral galaxies, barred spiral galaxies also contain a central bar composed of millions spinning stars.

A Barred Spiral Galaxy

An image of a barred spiral galaxy taken by the Hubble Telescope
An image of a barred spiral galaxy taken by the Hubble Telescope | Source
  • Elliptical galaxies

Elliptical galaxies can be small or among some of the largest galaxies in the known universe, made of stars all formed at the same time.

An Elliptical Galaxy

A photo of the Sombrero galaxy (M104). This galaxy is a bright, energetic elliptical galaxy.
A photo of the Sombrero galaxy (M104). This galaxy is a bright, energetic elliptical galaxy. | Source
  • Cannibal galaxies

Related to elliptical galaxies, cannibal galaxies form when a galaxy with a super-powerful gravitational field draws one or more smaller galaxies into itself.

A Cannibal Galaxy

An image of the cannibal galaxy named ESO 243-49
An image of the cannibal galaxy named ESO 243-49 | Source
  • Irregular galaxies

These are the smallest galaxies. They are irregular in shape. New stars continue to form within them from vast clouds of gas and dust.

An Irregular Galaxy

A photo of the the irregular galaxy NGC 1427A taken by the Hubble Telescope
A photo of the the irregular galaxy NGC 1427A taken by the Hubble Telescope | Source

5. What Is at the Center of a Galaxy?

Using powerful radio telescopes and imaging devices scientists have been able to look deep into the heart of our own galaxy, the Milky Way. Surrounding the center of the galaxy lies a zone of intense heat generated by billions of clustered stars. The evidence suggests that the center itself is a black hole.

6. The Center of the Milky Way

A composite image of the central area of the Milky Way galaxy
A composite image of the central area of the Milky Way galaxy | Source

Facts About the Milky Way Galaxy

Question
Answer
How old is the Milky Way?
11 billion years old
How many stars are in the Milky Way?
200 billion
What's the diameter of the Milky Way?
100,000 light years
What is the maximum thickness of the Milky Way?
20,000 light years
How far is the sun from the center of the Milky Way?
25,000 light years
How long does it take the sun to orbit the center of the Milky Way?
240 million years
Questions and answers about the Milky Way

7. Uncovering the Hidden Universe

Until the 1950s a dark zone stretched across the visible sky which seemed to be empty of all stars and galaxies. The reason that section of the universe was hidden remained a mystery until the invention of radio astronomy. Radio telescopes can see into the dark areas and detect gas clouds, stars and many galaxies. Cosmic dust caused the apparent invisibility of that area of the universe. A single grain of cosmic dust has a diameter of about a millionth of a millimeter. But large clouds of these tiny grains can cause starlight to scatter creating the illusion of dark space.

A Quasar

A powerful quasar burns at the center of a distant galaxy
A powerful quasar burns at the center of a distant galaxy | Source

8. What Is a Quasar?

While our own galaxy is relatively stable, other more distant galaxies burn with intense and violent energy caused by massive black holes destroying the matter that makes them. These are called quasars. The furthest away object in our visible universe is one such quasar, about 13.2 billion light years away. Some quasars are so intense that they can emit as much energy in just three minutes as the sun produces in 340,000 years. Our nearest quasar is about 2 billion light years away and is as bright as 200 galaxies.

Carl Sagan and the Pale Blue Dot

9. What Is the Future of the Universe?

Recent studies have discovered that the empty spaces in the universe are full of dark matter. The future of our universe may depend on how much dark matter there is. If there is enough dark matter, the universe may reach a point of maximum expansion before going into a kind of reverse gear as the dark matter pulls the galaxies back into a single, dense point. Or if there isn’t enough dark matter, the universe might continue to expand forever.

At the Big Bang the universe exploded into being with all matter coming into existence within fractions of a second. From that point stars and galaxies evolved. We are now in the stage of the universe’s evolution in which it is continuing to expand and grow larger. If the universe continues to expand infinitely to reach a point when all the stars and galaxies die, it will become no more than an infinite, empty, cold space. And that will be the end of that. Scientists call this “the heat death of the universe”.

Alternatively, if the universe reaches maximum expansion and begins to contract, reversing its history back into a single point of immense density, two possibilities arise. Either it will remain in that state indefinitely or it could explode again, creating a new universe.

End of the Universe Documentary

Which Are Our Nearest Galaxies?

Name of Galaxy
Type of Galaxy
Mass (in billions of sun masses)
Distance from Earth (in light years)
Andromeda (M31)
Spiral
300
2,500.000
Milky Way
Spiral
150
0
Triangulum (M33)
Spiral
10
2,500,000
Large Magellanic Cloud
Irregular
10
160,000
NGC 205
Elliptical
10
2,500,000
Small Magellanic Cloud
Irregular
2
190,000
NGC 185
Elliptical
1
2000,000
NGC 147
Elliptical
1
1,920,000
A table of facts about the galaxies nearest to Earth

10. How Do We Know About the Universe?

We know about the origin, evolution, and possible future of our universe through the work of several great cosmologists from Isaac Newton through to Stephen Hawking.

Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727)

Isaac Newton, often considered the “father of modern physics” developed the Theory of Gravity. In doing so, he laid the foundations of all the most exciting discoveries about the universe that came after him. He was the first to realize that the planets are held in their orbits by gravity rather than angels.

Portrait of Isaac Newton

A portrait of Sir Isaac Newton, the father of modern physics
A portrait of Sir Isaac Newton, the father of modern physics | Source

Max Planck (1858 – 1947)

You may think of quantum theory as a very recent idea, but it was first proposed in 1900 by Max Planck. He was the first to explain the way in which light can be measured both as waves and particles.

Portrait of Max Planck

A photograph of Max Planck
A photograph of Max Planck | Source

Edwin Hubble (1889-1953)

The evidence for the expanding universe was first presented by Edwin Hubble. He discovered that there were other galaxies far beyond the Milky Way. The world famous Hubble Telescope is named after him.

Portrait of Edwin Hubble

A photograph of Edwin Hubble
A photograph of Edwin Hubble | Source

Arno Penzias (1933-) and Robert Wilson (1936-)

These scientists both discovered that the universe resonates with a constant level of background radiation. This was the first clue that led to the discovery of the Big Bang.

A Portrait of Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson

A photograph of Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson standing next to a radio telescope
A photograph of Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson standing next to a radio telescope | Source

Albert Einstein (1879-1955)

Among Albert Einstein’s many breakthroughs is his Theory of General Relativity which explained that light is the fastest energy in the universe and that matter and energy are two expressions of the same thing.

A Portrait of Albert Einstein

A photograph of the physicist, Albert Einstein
A photograph of the physicist, Albert Einstein | Source

Stephen Hawking (1942-2018)

Despite a chronic degenerative disease leaving him almost entirely paralyzed, Stephen Hawking stands out as one of the greatest physicists of our age. Not only did he expand and develop the idea of gravity and provide insights into the nature of black holes, but he was also a popular science communicator able to explain complex theories to the general public.

Portrait of Stephen Hawking

A photograph of the late Stephen Hawking
A photograph of the late Stephen Hawking | Source

A Last Word

And that brings us to the end of our little tour of the known universe. But it isn't the end of the story. Many cosmologists and astrophysicists, both women and men, continue to explore the vastness of the universe, making exciting new discoveries every day.

© 2018 Amanda Littlejohn

If you have something you'd like to say, please leave your comment below!

Submit a Comment

  • stuff4kids profile imageAUTHOR

    Amanda Littlejohn 

    2 months ago

    Hi Shelley,

    Thank you for your comment. That's what I try to do. It's often because until I can find a simple way of putting things, I'm not sure I've understood it, either. :)

  • FlourishAnyway profile image

    FlourishAnyway 

    2 months ago from USA

    You have a way of explaining complex topics so that anyone can see understand them. Great article!

working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, owlcation.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://owlcation.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)